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Public Document No. 17 



THIETY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPOET 



State Board of Charity 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Year ending November 30, 1915. 




BOSTON: 

WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

32 DEENE STREET. 

1916. 



Approved by 
The Statb Boaed of Publication. 



JB 

CONTENTS 



Past and Present Members of the Board 
Presentation of the Report . 



PAGE 

vi, vii 
viii 



Part I 

General Work of the Board. 



Organization of the Report .... 










2 


Organization of the Boaird .... 










3 


By-laws 










4 


Duties of the Board 










6 


Staff Organization ..... 










7 


Recommendations for Legislation .... 










9 


New Laws affecting the Board 










12 


The State Institutions .... 










20 


Trustees 










21 


Numbers ...... 










22 


Capacity ...... 










22 


Cost of Maintenance .... 










23 


Movement of Population and Expenditures 










23 


The Institutions severally 










30 


The State Infirmary .... 










30 


The State Farm .... 










36 


Norfolk State Hospital 










40 


The State Training Schools 










43 


Lyman School for Boys . 










44 


Industrial School for Boys 










48 


Industrial School for Girls 










51 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 










54 


The State Tuberculosis Sanatoria 










58 


Rutland State Sanatorium 










61 


North Reading State Sanatorium 










65 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 










67 


Westfield State Sanatorium 










70 


Penikese Hospital .... 










73 


Financial Administration of Institutions 










116 


Inventory ...... 










116 


Receipts ...... 










120 


Expenditures ..... 










122 


Analysis of Maintenance and Net Per Capita Cost 








123 


Comparison of Appropriations and Expenditures 








133 


Appropriations for Special Purposes 








135 


Net Cost to the Commonwealth 








137 


Analysis of Pay Roll .... 










139 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



The County Training Schools ..... 

Supervision of the Settled Poor ..... 
Settled Poor in Families 
Dependent Minor Children in Almshouses 
Dependent Minor Children in Families, with Settlement 

Penalty incurred by Cities and Towns for Failure to make Pauper Returns 

Supervision of Mothers' Aid 

Administrative Duties of the Board 

After-care of Women and Children discharged from 

Children in the Care and Custody of the Board 

Licensed Boarding Houses for Infants 

Licensed Lying-in Hospitals 

Tuition of State Minor Wards 

The Board's Finances . 

Meetings of the Board 



the State Infirmary 



PAGE 

146 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
175 
181 
184 
204 
213 
217 
221 
238' 



Part II 

Incorporated Private Charities. 

Investigation of Charitable Organizations seeking Incorporation 
Inspection of Charitable Corporations ..... 
Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations .... 
Alphabetical Index ........ 



m 

V 

xi 
356 



Part III 

Almshouses and Statistics of Poor Relief by Cities and Towns. 

The City and Town Almshouses ........ iii 

Laws relating to ......... . iii 

Inspection ........... iv 

Almshouses closed ......... iv 

General Suggestions ......... iv 

Management .......... v 

Construction .......... vi 

Number of Inmates ... . . . . . . . vii 

Consumptive Inmates ......... viii 

Defective Inmates ......... viii 

Vagrants ........... viii 

Act relative to the Lodging of Tramps and Vagrants by Cities and 

Towns ........... ix 

Libraries of Books ......... ix 

Farm and Farm Products ........ ix 

Fire Protection .......... x 

Recommendations made . . . . . . . . x 

Improvements .......... xii 

Almshouse Visitors ......... xiii 

Reports 1-94 

Statistics of the Poor Relief ......... 97 

Numbers relieved .......... 97 

Cost of Poor Relief 102 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by 

Cities and Towns ...... 104 

II. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by 

the State 110 



CONTENTS. V 

Statistics of the Poor Relief — Concluded. page 

Table III. — Movement of Poor Supported or Relieved . . 110 

IV. — Classification by Color, Nativity and Sex . . . Ill 

V. — Native-born Poor Persons, Classified by Parent Nativity 111 

VI. — Classification of First Admissions by Age at Admission 

and Sex 112 

VII. — Classification by Present Age ..... 113 

VIII. — Classification by Mental Defect and Sex . . . 114 
IX. — Classification of Discharges by Character of Discharge 

and Sex . . . . . . . .114 

X. — Classification of Foreign-born by Countries of Birth . 115 
XI, — Percentage of Classes of Persons Relieved to Whole 

Number Relieved . . . . . .115 

XII. — Numerical Relation to Whole Population of Several 

Classes of Persons Relieved . . . . . 116 

XIII. — Cost to Cities and Towns of Support and Relief 117-126 

XIV. — Net Cost to State of Support and Relief in Institutions 

and in Families ....... 127 

XV. — Total Net Cost of Public Poor Relief ... 127 



VI 



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State House, Boston, May 22, 1916. 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The Thirty-seventh Annual Report of the State Board of 
Charity, covering the year from December 1, 1914, to Novem- 
ber 30, 1915, is herewith respectfully presented. 

LEONTINE LINCOLN, Chairman 
CHARLES H. ADAMS, Vice-Chairman 
A. C. RATSHESKY 
JEFFREY R. BRACKETT 
CHARLOTTE J. GUILD 
MARY A. BARR 
THOMAS DOWNEY 
CHARLES R. JOHNSON 
ROBERT M. MERRICK, M.D. 



REPORT 

OF^THE 

State Board of Charity 



Part I 



General Work of the Board 



OEGANIZATION OF THE EEPORT. 



The following report is divided for convenience into three 
parts. Part I. deals with the general work of the Board, its 
duties, both supervisory and administrative. This part is the 
main text of the report, and is published only with the full 
report. 

Part II. is devoted entirely to the Board's duties with refer- 
ence to private charitable enterprises. It is published as a 
separate pamphlet and serves as a handbook of the incorporated 
charities of the Commonwealth. It contains an introductory 
analysis of the year's investigations of petitions for the incor- 
poration of charitable enterprises, under Acts of 1910, chapter 
181; also a corresponding account of the inspection of chari- 
table corporations, under Acts of 1909, chapter 379. The 
main body of this part of the report is given up to abstracts of 
the annual returns made to the Board by private charitable 
corporations under the requirements of Revised Laws, chapter 
84, section 14, as amended by Acts of 1913, chapter 82. 

Part III. contains an introductory analysis of the year's 
inspections of almshouses, together with an abstract of condi- 
tions found at each institution. At the end of this part is a 
chapter on poor relief, which contains text and tabulated anal- 
ysis of the returns of poor persons relieved, made by the re- 
spective cities and towns under the provisions of Revised Laws, 
chapter 81, section 40. Part III. is published as a separate 
pamphlet, and serves as a handbook for almshouse wardens 
and other local public relief officials. 

As provided by statute, 2,000 copies of the full report are 
printed. There are issued in addition 1,000 copies of Part II. 
and 500 copies of Part III. 

For convenience in publishing, the index to each of the three 
parts is to be found at the end of its own text instead of at 
the end of the book. 



GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



ORGANIZATION. 
The membership of the Board is as follows: — 

Leontine Lincoln, Fall River, Chairman, 
Charles H. Adams, Melrose, Vice-Chair man. 
Charles R. Johnson, Worcester. 
Abraham C. Ratshesky, Boston. 
Jeffrey R. Brackett, Boston. 
Thomas Downey, Boston. 
Miss Mary A. Barr, Boston. 
Robert M. Merrick, M.D., Boston. 
Mrs. Curtis Guild, Boston. 

Standing Committees. 

Committee on State Adult Poor: Mr. Ratshesky, Mr. Adams, 
Mr. Johnson, Miss Barr, Dr. Merrick and the Chairman. 

Committee on State Minor Wards: Mr. Brackett, Mr. Adams, 
Mr. Downey, Mrs. Guild, Miss Barr and the Chairman. 

Committee of General Visitation and Inspection: Mr. Rat- 
shesky, Mrs. Guild, Dr. Merrick, Miss Barr, Mr. Johnson and 
the Chairman. 

Committee on Inspection of Almshouses: Mr. Johnson, Dr. 
Merrick, Mr. Downey, Miss Barr and the Chairman. 

Committee on Finance: Mr. Downey, Mr. Adams, Mr. Rat- 
shesky and the Chairman. 

Committee on Social Service: Miss Barr, Mr. Adams, Mrs. 
Guild, Mr. Brackett and the Chairman. 

Executive Committee: Mr. Lincoln, Mr. Adams, Mr. Ratshesky, 
Mr. Brackett, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Downey, Miss Barr. 

Executive Officers. 
Robert W. Kelso, Secretary of the Board. 
Frank W. Goodhue, Superintendent of State Adult Poor. 
James E. Fee, Superintendent of State Minor Wards. 

In addition to its executive oiSicers the Board employs a reg- 
ular paid force of 51 men and 104 women, and receives the 
gratuitous services of 46 auxiliary visitors and 90 almshouse 
visitors, all women, and 41 parole visitors, all men. 



STATE BOAED OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BY-LAWS OF THE BOARD. 

1. The Board shall, at its regular meeting in June in each 
year, elect by ballot a Chairman and Vice-Chairman, who shall 
each hold office for one year, or until his successor shall have 
been chosen. Any vacancy in the office of Chairman or Vice- 
Chairman, during the year for which he may be elected, shall be 
filled by ballot. In the absence or disability of the Chairman or 
Vice-Chairman, a Chairman pro tempore may be chosen as the 
Board may determine. 

2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the first 
and third Fridays of each month in the rooms of the Board at 
the State House, at two and one-half o'clock in the afternoon, or 
at such other place and hour as the Board may from time to 
time direct. Special meetings may be called by the Chairman, or, 
in his absence, by the Vice-Chairman, at such time and place 
as may be most convenient for the members of the Board; and 
in notifying such meetings the Secretary shall specify the sub- 
jects to be considered. Four members shall constitute a quorum 
for the transaction of business. 

3. The Committees of the Board shall be: (1) a Committee on 
State Adult Poor, to consist of five members; (2) a Committee 
on State Minor Wards, to consist of five members; (3) a Com- 
mittee of General Visitation and Inspection, to consist of six 
members; (4) a Committee on Inspection of Almshouses, to 
consist of four members; (5) a Committee on Finance, to con- 
sist of three members; (6) a Committee on Social Service, to 
consist of five members; — all to be appointed by the Chair- 
man; (7) an Executive Committee, to consist of the Chairman, 
the Vice-Chairman and the Chairmen of the Standing Commit- 
tees. The Chairman of the Board shall be, ex officio, an addi- 
tional member of each of the Standing Committees. The Com- 
mittee on State Adult Poor and the Committee on State Minor 
Wards shall severally hold meetings immediately before the 
monthly meetings of the Board, for the purpose of considering 
the reports of the Superintendents of Divisions, and preparing 
recommendations for the Board. The Committee of General 
Visitation and Inspection shall make monthly reports to the 
Board. The Committee on Inspection of Almshouses shall 
superintend and direct the visitation and inspection of city and 
town almshouses, and shall make monthly reports to the Board. 
The Committee on Finance shall have general supervision of the 
expenditures of the Board under the several annual appropria- 
tions. The Executive Committee shall act for the Board in 
the intervals between its meetings, whenever immediate action 
is demanded; such action shall be reported at the next regular 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BQARD. 5 

meeting of the Board, and, if no objection is made, shall be 
regarded as the will of the Board. 

4. There shall be a Secretary of the Board, to be appointed 
by the Board. He shall be the Clerk of the Board, its auditor, 
and its disbursing officer. He shall be present at the meetings 
of the Board and of the Executive Committee, and keep a record 
of all transactions. He shall, subject to the direction of the 
Board, prepare the Annual Report and other reports and sta- 
tistics; execute all provisions of the laws relating to incorporation 
of charities; execute all provisions of the laws relating to in- 
spection and supervision, except such as are assigned to the 
Superintendents of State Adult Poor and State Minor Wards; 
and study and report to the Board on methods of public aid 
in this country and abroad. He shall make a monthly report 
to the Board of his audits and of other matters of concern to 
his office, and shall perform such other work as may be required 
of him. 

5. There shall be a Superintendent of State Adult Poor, to be 
appointed by the Board. He shall, subject to the direction of 
the Board, execute all the provisions of the laws relating to sane 
inmates of the State Infirmary and the State Farm, the sick 
State poor, those ill of dangerous diseases, and those receiving 
temporary relief. He shall also make all necessary examinations 
and investigations regarding the settlement of all sane persons 
receiving public aid. He shall make monthly visits to the 
State Infirmary and the State Farm, and quarterly visits to 
the Rutland State Sanatorium, the North Reading State San- 
atorium, the Lakeville State Sanatorium, and the Westfield 
State Sanatorium, and report upon their condition. His reports 
shall be made monthly, and he shall also annually, on or before 
December 15, furnish a summary of his work for the preceding 
fiscal year. He shall certify monthly to the Superintendents of 
the Foxborough State Hospital, the Massachusetts Hospital 
for Epileptics, and the Massachusetts School for the Feeble- 
minded, the amounts due from cities, towns and individuals for 
the support of inmates of the above-named institutions; and 
shall perform such other duties as may be required of him. 
There shall be a Deputy Superintendent, who shall be under the 
direction of the Superintendent, and who shall have charge 
of the work relating to the outdoor poor. The Superintendent 
shall also, subject to confirmation by the Board, designate one 
member of his staff as his assistant. 

6. There shall be a Superintendent of State Minor Wards, to 
be appointed by the Board. He shall, subject to the direction 
of the Board, execute all the provisions of the laws relating to 
neglected and dependent children and juvenile offenders, and 



6 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

shall provide for the placing and visitation of all such children. 
Monthly visits shall be made under his direction to the Lyman 
School for Boys, the State Industrial School for Girls, the Massa- 
chusetts Hospital School, and the Industrial School for Boys, with 
reports upon their condition. He shall have charge of all moneys 
belonging to State minor wards. His reports shall be made 
monthly, and he shall annually, on or before December 15, 
furnish a summary of his work for the preceding fiscal year, 
and shall perform such other duties as may be required of him. 
There shall be a Deputy Superintendent, who shall be under the 
direction of the Superintendent, and who shall have charge of 
the children over three years of age and of the infants. 

7. All ofiicers, agents and other employees appointed by the 
Board shall hold oflBce during the pleasure of the Board. 

8. These by-laws may be amended by a vote of two-thirds 
of the full Board, at any regular meeting, after previous notice 
of the change that is desired in the same by any member has 
been mailed to each member by the Secretary, three days, at 
least, before any vote shall be taken by the Board to make the 
proposed change. 

DUTIES OF THE BOARD. 

The duties of the Board may be divided into two main 
groups, namely, supervisory and administrative. As a conse- 
quence of these executive obligations the Board is also required 
to report and publish the results of its work, with tabulated 
statements regarding the number of poor persons relieved in 
the Commonwealth at public expense, together with the cost 
thereof. Finally, it is empowered, in like manner with other 
boards and commissions, to recommend to the Legislature such 
changes in existing laws and the enactment of such new meas- 
ures as it deems advisable. This year, by special legislative 
authorization, the Board has prepared and published a manual 
of all the laws relating to the charities of the Commonwealth. 
In more specific form the supervisory duties comprise : — 
The visitation and inspection of the State Infirmary at 
Tewksbury; the State Farm at Bridgewater; the Norfolk State 
Hospital for Inebriates at Norfolk; the Lyman School for Boys 
at Westborough; the State Industrial School for Girls at 
Lancaster; the JNIassachusetts Hospital School at Canton; the 
Industrial School for Boys at Shirley; the State Sanatoria at 
Rutland, North Reading, Lakeville and Westfield; the city and 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 7 

town almshouses; the county training schools; the children in 
the custody of the Lyman and Industrial Schools cared for in 
families; the children supported by cities and towns and adults 
supported in families, other than their own, by cities and 
towns; and such charitable corporations reporting to the Board 
as ask for, or consent to, such visitation and inspection; inves- 
tigation, with public hearing, and report to the Secretary of 
the Commonwealth in all cases of applications for the incor- 
poration of charitable organizations; supervision of the work 
of the cities and towns in the relief of mothers with dependent 
children under fourteen years of age; supervision of wayfarers' 
lodges and public lodging houses, as provided in chapter 606 
of the Acts of 1914. In addition, the Board has, with reference 
to the Hospital Cottages for Children at Baldwinville, the super- 
visory duty formerly carried by the State Board of Insanity. 

The administrative duties are as follows : — 

(a) The discharge of sane inmates of the State Infirmary 
and the State Farm; the execution of laws relative to the re- 
lease on parole of prisoners at the State Farm; the investiga- 
tion as to legal settlement of persons, possibly State cases, who 
have been supported, relieved or buried by cities and towns, 
and of sane inmates of State institutions; the directing of aid 
of unsettled persons by cities and towns; the transfer of sane 
paupers from one institution to another; the sending of paupers 
to the places within and without the State where they belong; 
and the administration of the leper hospital at Penikese Island. 

(6) The care and maintenance of delinquent, neglected and 
dependent children coming into the custody of the Board 
through court commitment and otherwise; and the execution 
of the laws concerning abandoned infants and infant boarding 
houses; and the licensing of lying-in hospitals. 

STAFF ORGANIZATION FOR CARRYING OUT FUNCTIONS. 
A. Supervisory Functions. 
The visitation and inspection of State institutions is made 
by committees of the Board and by the executive officers. 
Inspection of almshouses is made by an inspector working under 
the direction of the committee on almshouses. In this duty 



8 STATE BOAKD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

the Board is. greatly assisted by its corps of unpaid friendly 
visitors of whom there were 91 last year. The supervision of 
local relief to mothers with dependent children is carried out 
by a supervisor and corps of visitors attached to the Division 
of State Adult Poor. The county training schools are visited 
and reported upon by the secretary, while supervision of local 
child placing is done by the regular staff of visitors. The 
secretary is responsible to the Board for all matters of super- 
vision relating to private charitable enterprises, under Revised 
Laws, chapter 84, Acts of 1909, chapter 379 and Acts of 1910, 
chapter 181. This branch of the Board's activities, in par- 
ticular that which relates to private charities and the inspec- 
tion of institution plant and finances, is reviewed by the com- 
mittee of general visitation and inspection. For report of the 
year's work under this group see Part I., pages 9-174, and 
the whole of Parts II. and III. 

B. Administrative Functions. 

The administrative functions of the Board are carried out 
through two main divisions, namely, the Division of State 
Adult Poor and the Division of State Minor Wards. To the 
Division of State Minor Wards falls all duties relating to the 
care and maintenance of minors in the Board's custody, and 
the ancillary duties of licensing and inspection of infant board- 
ing houses and lying-in hospitals. The work of this division 
is reviewed by the committee on State Minor Wards. An 
account of the year's results will be found on pages 184-220 of 
Part I. 

All other administrative functions are executed through the 
Division of State Adult Poor, the work of its superintendent 
and staff being reviewed by the committees on State Adult 
Poor and social service. The results are reported on pages 
174-183 of Part I. 

All standing committees, except the committee on finance 
and the executive committee, meet at regular intervals. The 
full Board meets regularly on the first and third Fridays of 
each month. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 9 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

The following are the recommendations of the Board for 
legislative action, all of which have been forwarded to the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth as required by Acts of 1910, 
chapter 452 : — 

1. Immediate Development of the Third School for 

THE Feeble-minded, for the Location and Arrange- 
ment OF WHICH AN Appropriation w^\s granted 
Last Year. 
Feeble-mindedness is to an alarming extent the cause of 
the occasion out of which spring the defects that now demand 
over one-third of all the revenue of the Commonwealth to 
repair. Sexual vice, crime, inebriety, juvenile delinquency 
all secure their most active recruits from this class of mental 
defectives. At every turn ii) its work the State Board of 
Charity meets problems that can be solved only with great 
and constant application of money and personal service, but 
which, nevertheless, might have been prevented by timely 
protection of the community against the results of mental 
defect. Systems of relief and of public safety have been so 
far developed that vre now find ourselves fostering the breed- 
ing of feeble-minded persons. By these means the otherwise 
high death rate among defectives is being greatly reduced. 
And all this, even though it is well known that at least 80 per 
cent of all feeble-mindedness is hereditary and the birth rate 
in this class is very high. 

The only reasonable course, in view of our present knowl- 
edge, is the early enlargement of our facilities for segregation 
in institutions, and the intensive study of the problem of extra 
institutional care. 

2. Establishment of a Hospital for the Care and Treat- 

ment OF Sick State Minor Wards. 
This recommendation is repeated from last year and the 
year before. The State Board of Charity has constantly in 
its care hundreds of children each one of whom is for days. 



10 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

weeks or perhaps months in need of hospital treatment. 
Such children are for the time being incapable of placement 
in homes. They require treatment in some institution until 
their health is such that they may be sent out into the com- 
munity. With a total of 5,700 children in the Board's custody, 
this miargin of cases requiring hospital care is constant, and 
may be expected to increase 6 or 7 per cent each year, in 
exact proportion to the normal increase in the total number of 
wards. Some of these are feeble-minded, and would be cared 
for properly should the foregoing recommendation in regard to 
more care for the feeble-minded meet with favor; but a large 
number must still remain. Yet the Board has no hospital in 
which to treat these children. Some, falling sick in their foster 
homes, are cared for by private hospitals at State expense. 
Most are sent to the State Infirmary, the only hospital to which 
the Board can send them. Here they are out of place, and tend 
to hamper the infirmary in its more legitimate activities. Thus 
located, they are an ever-increasing danger to themselves. At 
the same time, they lose the benefit of special care and treat- 
ment so frequently demanded by the miserable condition in 
which they are found by the authorities and in which they 
remain at the time of commitment to the Board's custody. 

In view of these considerations the Board recommends the 
establishment of a children's hospital, in some place other 
than Tewksbury, for the temporary care and treatment of 
State minor wards too ill to be cared for in foster homes. 



3. Creation of a Separate Board of Trustees to ad- 
minister Penikese Hospital, retaining only the 
Supervision in the State Board of Charity. 
As represented in former years, though the State Board of 
Charity has ahvays believed that lepers should be cared for 
on the mainland where nearness of friends and relatives 
would soften the sadness of exile, and where the outlay of 
public money would be much less, while the danger to the 
community would be no greater, it has nevertheless main- 
tained and developed the hospital located on the island of 
Penikese in response to the absolute demand of the public 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 11 

that persons suffering with this disease shall be isolated in 
some place remote from the daily life of the people; and 
this work will be cheerfully continued, should the Legislature 
consider that the wiser course. This recommendation of a 
separate administrative board is made in the belief that it 
is now possible to secure the services of specialists in this 
disease upon such a hospital board, and in the further belief 
that the administration of State institutions and their super- 
vision should in all cases be placed in separate bodies, and 
that the duties of a board primarily supervisory in nature should 
not be complicated by administrative duties, where necessity 
or considerations of public expediency do not appear. 



4. Amendment of Chapter 181 of the Acts of the Year 

1910, RENDERING THE APPROVAL OF THE StATE BoARD 

of Charity requisite to the Incorporation of Pri- 
vate Charities, and providing that All Changes 
OF Name or of Purpose shall be investigated in 
Like Manner with Petitions for Incorporation. 
Under the existing statute the Board is required to investi- 
gate all petitions for the incorporation of private charities, 
to give public hearings and to report its j&ndings to the Secre- 
tary of the Commonwealth. The operation of this law, in 
connection with chapter 402 of the Acts of the year 1903, 
requiring annual reporting by all charities, and chapter 379 
of the Acts of the year 1909, providing annual inspection 
of incorporated charitable agencies, is demonstrating beyond 
all question the wisdom of State supervision of incorporated 
charitable agencies. Though this policy is of recent date, the 
incorporated charities of the entire Commonwealth have come 
to look upon State supervision as a help in the development 
of right standards of relief. Bearing in mind the public trus- 
teeship involved in every private charity, the Board believes 
that the time has come when its special knowledge in the field 
of private charities should be brought to bear upon all new 
petitions for the incorporation of charities by rendering its 
approval requisite to the issuance of a charter. The recom- 
mendation is repeated from last year. 



12 STATE BOAED OF CRARITY. [P. D. 17. 

5. Amendment to Chapter 797 of the Acts of 1913 to 
PROVIDE AN Increase from 87 per Week to 810.50 
PER Week in the Rate of Reimbursement allowed 
BY the Commonwealth to Cities and Towns for 
Sick Aid in Local Hospitals. 
Under the provisions of section 15 of chapter 85 of the 
Revised Laws, the Commonwealth has for many years allowed 
reimbursement to cities and towns for aid rendered to sick 
persons in local hospitals where such persons were found with- 
out settlement. Formerly the amount of such reimbursement 
was fixed at a maximum of 85 per week, this rate appearing at 
that time to approximate the average amount expended by 
cities and towns for such aid. In 1913 this maximum was in- 
creased to 87, though it appeared that the average amount 
paid by the cities and towns for such aid was probably in 
excess of that amount. 

This Board believes the intent of the law to be the reim- 
bursement of the average reasonable amount paid. It is also 
satisfied that the average reasonable amount paid is at the 
present time not less than 810.50 per week. It therefore 
recommends that that amount be fixed as the maximum limit 
of reimbursement. 

LAWS AFFECTING THE BOARD, PASSED BY THE LEGISLA- 
TURE OF 1915. 

General Acts of 1915. 

Chapter 14. 

An Act relative to notice of filing of instruments creat- 
ing charitable funds. 

Section 1. Whenever there shall be filed for record in a 
registry of deeds or of probate any testamentary document or 
deed of trust, or other instrument, creating or increasing an 
estate or fund for benevolent, charitable, humane or philan- 
thropic purposes the register shall forthwith send to the state 
board of charity a statement setting forth the book and page 
in the registry where the instrument is recorded, with the name, 
if any, of the said estate or fund, and further stating by whom 
the said estate or fund has been created or increased, and by 
whom it is to be administered. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Ap- 
proved February 17, 1915. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 13 



Chapter 53. 

An Act relative to notice of petitions for adoption in 

certain cases. 

Section 1. Section- four of chapter one hundred and fifty- 
four of the Revised Laws is hereby amended by adding at the 
end thereof the words: — But if such child is of unknown par- 
entage and is a foundling, publication as herein set forth shall 
not be required; but notice of the petition shall be given to the 
state board of charity, — so as to read as follows: — Section 4- 
If the written consent required by the provisions of the two 
preceding sections is not submitted to the court with the peti- 
tion, the court shall order notice by personal service on the 
parties of a copy of the petition and order thereon, or, if they 
are not found within this commonwealth, by publication of the 
petition and order once in each of three successive weeks in 
such newspaper as the court orders, the last publication to be 
seven days at least before the time appointed for the hearing, 
and the court may require additional notice and consent. But 
if such child is of unknown parentage and is a foundling, pub- 
lication as herein set forth shall not be required; but notice of 
the petition shall be given to the state board of charity. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Aj)- 
proved March 12, 1915. 

Chapter 73. 

An Act relative to the commitment of dipsomaniacs and 
persons addicted to the intemperate use of narcotics 
and stimulants. 
Section L Section fifty of chapter five hundred and four 
of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and nine, as amended 
by chapter five hundred and fifty-eight of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and fourteen, is hereby further amended by 
striking out the words "any male", in the fifth line, by striking 
out the words "except the Norfolk state hospital", in the 
seventh line, and by inserting after the word "any", in the 
same line, the words: — male or, — so as to read as follows: — 
Section 50. Any of the judges named in section twenty-nine 
and the justices of the municipal court of the city of Boston 
may commit to the Norfolk state hospital, the McLean hospital, 
or to a private licensed hospital or house, or to any hospital or 
licensed receptacle for the insane, public or private, any male 
or female, who is subject to dipsomania or inebriety either in 
public or private, or who is so addicted to the intemperate use 
of narcotics or stimulants as to have lost the power of self 
control; but no such commitment shall be made until satis- 



14 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

factory evidence is presented to the judge by whom the pro- 
ceedings for commitment are heard that such person is not of 
bad repute or of bad character apart from such habits of in- 
temperance. The magistrate who receives the application for 
such commitment shall examine on oath the applicant and all 
other witnesses, shall reduce the application to writing and cause 
it to be subscribed and sworn to by the applicant. He shall 
cause a summons and copy of the application to be served upon 
such person in the manner provided by section twenty-five of 
chapter two hundred and seventeen of the Revised Laws. Such 
person shall be entitled to a hearing, unless after receiving said 
summons he shall in writing waive a hearing; and in that case 
the magistrate may issue an order for his immediate commit- 
ment to said hospital without such hearing if he is of the opinion 
that such person is a proper subject for its treatment and 
custody. The commitment may be made forthwith, if the 
examining physician certifies the case to be one of emergency. 
A person committed as aforesaid may be detained for two 
years from the date of his commitment and no longer. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Ap- 
proved March 17, 1915. 

Chapter 7S. 

An Act relative to the school attendance of minors. 

Section four of chapter forty-four of the Revised Laws, as 
amended by chapter three hundred and seventy-five of the acts 
of the year nineteen hundred and five, and by section two of 
chapter two hundred and sixty-eight of the acts of the year nine- 
teen hundred and eleven, and by section four of chapter seven 
hundred and seventy-nine of the acts of the year nineteen hun- 
dred and thirteen, is hereby further amended by striking out 
the word "fifty", in the forty-second line, and inserting in. 
place thereof the word: — seventy-five, — and by striking out 
after the word "schools", in the forty-fourth line, the words 
" or, if the school committee of said city or town so desires, an 
amount equal to the average expense for each pupil of such 
school during the preceding year, for a period equal to the time 
during which the child so attends", — so that the third para- 
graph of the section will read as follows: — For the tuition in 
the public schools in any city or town of any child between 
the ages of five and fifteen years who shall be placed else- 
where than in his own home by the state board of charity, 
or by the trustees of the Massachusetts training schools, or 
kept under the control of either of said boards in such city or 
town, the commonwealth shall pay to said city or town, and for 
such tuition of any such child so placed by the trustees for chil- 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 15 

dren of the city of Boston, or so kept under the control of said 
trustees, the city of Boston from its appropriation for school 
purposes, shall pay to said city or town seventy-five cents for 
each week of five days, or major part thereof, of attendance of 
every such child in the public schools. [Approved March 18, 
1915. 

Chapter 81, Section 1. 

An Act relative to school attendance and to the employ- 
ment OF MINORS. 
Section 1. Section one of chapter forty-four of the Revised 
Laws, as amended by chapter three hundred and twenty of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred and five, by chapter three 
hundred and eighty-three of the acts of the year nineteen hun- 
dred and six, and by section one of chapter seven hundred and 
seventy-nine of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
thirteen, is hereby further amended by striking out, in the 
thirtieth line, the word "five", and inserting in place thereof 
the word: — seven, — and by striking out the word **ten", 
in the same line, and inserting in place thereof the word : — 
fourteen, — so as to read as follows: — Section 1. Every child 
betw^een seven and fourteen years of age, every child under 
sixteen years of age who does not possess such ability to read, 
write and spell in the English language as is required for the 
completion of the fourth grade of the public schools of the city 
or town in which he resides, and every child under sixteen years 
of age who has not received an employment certificate as pro- 
vided in this act and is not engaged in some regular employment 
or business for at least six hours per day or has not the written 
permission of the superintendent of schools of the city or town 
in which he resides to engage in profitable employment at home, 
shall attend a public day school in said city or town or some 
other day school approved by the school committee, during the 
entire time the public schools are in session, subject to such ex- 
ceptions as are provided for in sections four, five and six of this 
chapter and in section three of chapter forty-two of the Revised 
Laws, as amended by chapter four hundred and thirty-three 
of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and two, and by chapter 
five hundred and thirty-seven of the acts of the year nineteen 
hundred and eleven; but such attendance shall not be required 
of a child whose physical or mental condition is such as to render 
attendance inexpedient or impracticable, or who is being other- 
wise instructed in a manner approved in advance by the superin- 
tendent of schools or the school committee. The superintendent 
of schools, or teachers in so far as authorized by said super- 
intendent or by the school committee, may excuse cases of 



16 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

necessary absence for other causes not exceeding seven day ses- 
sions or fourteen half-day sessions in any period of six months. 
For the purposes of this section, school committees shall approve 
a private school only when the instruction in all the studies 
required by law is in the English language, and when they are 
satisfied that such instruction equals in thoroughness and effi- 
ciency, and in the progress made therein, the instruction in the 
public schools in the same city or town; but they shall not 
refuse to approve a private school on account of the religious 
teaching therein. [Approved March 18, 1915. 



Chapter 113. 

An Act further to define the powers and duties of the 
trustees of massachusetts training schools. 

Section 1. The board of trustees in charge of the industrial 
school for boys, of the industrial school for girls and of the 
Lyman school for boys, may grant an honorable discharge to 
any person in their custody who, in its opinion, for meritorious 
conduct is worthy and deserving of such a discharge, and whom 
the trustees believe to be permanently reformed. The court of 
commitment shall be so notified in writing and thereupon shall 
make an entry to the foregoing effect in their records concerning 
this particular person. An honorable discharge by the trustees, 
or upon attaining the age of twenty-one years, shall be a com- 
plete release from all penalties or disabilities incurred in conse- 
quence of commitment to any of the foregoing institutions. 

Section 2. The trustees may transfer any person committed 
or transferred to the industrial school for boys or to the Lyman 
school for boys, who is still in the custody of said trustees, and 
who has proved unmanageable or an improper person to remain 
in either of the said institutions, to the Massachusetts reforma- 
tory; and in the same way may transfer any person committed 
or transferred to the industrial school for girls and still in the 
custody of the trustees, to the reformatory for women. Any 
person so transferred shall be accompanied by all mittimuses 
and processes, by a copy of the medical report, and by the facts 
covering the history and conduct of the person, and of the 
circumstances of the person's home, so far as they can be ascer- 
tained. In all other respects the transfer shall have the same 
effect as is now provided by law. All provisions of law in- 
consistent with this section are hereby repealed. 

Section 3. The trustees may act as guardians for any boy 
or girl in their charge who is under twenty-one years of age 
and who has neither parent living nor any guardian otherwise 
appointed, with all the power and authority conferred by the 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 17 

provisions of chapter one hundred and forty-five of the Revised 
Laws and amendments thereof, except that when a guardian 
otherwise may be appointed, the powers herein conferred shall 
cease. 

Section 4. The trustees shall make earnest effort to induce 
boys and girls, in their charge on parole, to save some portion 
of their earnings which, under the direction of the trustees, shall 
be placed in savings banks and held by them for the benefit 
of the ward, or when deemed necessary, expended in his or her 
behalf, or by direction of the trustees applied on liabilities in- 
curred by the ward. Upon the attaining of the age of twenty- 
one years, unless a different agreement is made by the trustees 
with the ward, these deposits shall be paid to the ward, or in 
case of death at any time, to his legal representatives. 

Section 5. The provisions of chapter three hundred and 
sixty-two of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and seven 
shall be extended to inmates of the industrial school for boys. 

Section 6. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Ap- 
proved March 27, 1915. 

Chapter 122. 

An Act to direct the county of hampden to erect build- 
ings FOR A COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOL. 

Section L The county commissioners of the county of 
Hampden are hereby authorized and directed to erect in the 
county of Hampden suitable buildings for a Hampden county 
training school, and to equip and furnish the buildings suitably 
for the instruction and training of children committed thereto 
as habitual truants or school offenders. 

Section 2. In order to meet the expense incurred under 
this act the county commissioners of the county of Hampden 
are hereby authorized to borrow from time to time upon the 
credit of the county a sum not exceeding one hundred thousand 
dollars, and to issue the bonds and notes of the county therefor. 
The bonds or notes shall be payable in such annual payments, 
beginning not more than one year after the date of each loan, 
as will extinguish each loan within twenty years from its date, 
and the amount of such annual payment of any loan in any 
year shall not be less than the amount of the principal of the 
loan payable in any subsequent year. Each authorized issue of 
bonds or notes shall constitute a separate loan. The said bonds 
or notes shall bear interest at a rate not exceeding five per cent 
per annum, payable semi-annually, and shall be signed by the 
treasurer of the county and countersigned by a majority of the 
county commissioners. The county may sell the said securities 
at public or private sale, upon such terms and conditions as the 



18 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

county commissioners may deem proper, but they shall not be 
sold for less than their par value, and the proceeds shall be 
used only for the purposes herein specified. 

Section 3. The county commissioners, at the time of au- 
thorizing the said loan, shall provide for the payment thereof 
in accordance with the provisions of this act; and a sum suffi- 
cient to pay the interest as it accrues on the bonds or notes 
issued as aforesaid, and to pay the principal when it becomes 
due, shall be levied as a part of the county tax of the county of 
Hampden annually thereafter, in the same manner in which 
other county taxes are levied, until the debt incurred by said 
loan is extinguished. 

Section 4. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [Ap- 
proved March 30, 1915. 

Chapter 136. 

An Act relative to the service of warrants and processes 
for the apprehension and commitment of insane per- 
sons and others. 
Warrants and all other processes which are issued by a judge 
for the apprehension or commitment of insane persons, or of 
persons subject to dipsomania or inebriety, or who are addicted 
to the intemperate use of narcotics or stimulants, or of feeble- 
minded persons, or of persons subject to epilepsy, may be directed 
to and served by a court officer, by any sheriff, deputy sheriff, 
constable or police officer, or by any private person whom said 
judge may designate; and such warrants and processes may 
run into any county in which any of said persons to be appre- 
hended or committed may be found, and any of such officers 
or persons to whom such warrants and processes are directed 
may serve the same in any part of the commonwealth. [Ap- 
proved April 3, 1915. 

Chapter 163. 

An Act relative to the support of destitute parents. 

Section 1. Any person, above the age of twenty-one years, 
who, being possessed of sufficient means, unreasonably neglects 
or refuses to provide for the support and maintenance of his 
parent, whether father or mother, residing in this common- 
wealth, when such parent through misfortune and without fault 
of his own is destitute of means of sustenance and unable by 
reason of old age, infirmity or illness to support and maintain 
himself or herself, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding 
two hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not more than one 
year, or by both such fine and imprisonment. No such neglect 
or refusal shall be deemed unreasonable as to a child who shall 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 19 

not during his or her minority have been reasonably supported 
by such parent, if the parent was charged with the duty so to 
do, nor as to any child who, being one of two or more children, 
has made proper and reasonable contribution toward the support 
of such destitute parent. 

Section 2. Before the trial, with the consent of the de- 
fendant, or at the trial, on entry of a plea of guilty or after con- 
viction, the court may, in its discretion, make such orders and 
require such conditions for the benefit of such destitute parent 
as are provided for in the case of a wife or a minor child by 
chapter four hundred and fifty-six of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and eleven and acts in amendment thereof 
and in addition thereto, and the practice thereby established 
shall, so far as it is applicable, apply to proceedings under this 
act. 

Section 3. Complaints under the provisions of this act may 
be made by any such parent, by any child of such a parent, by 
the overseers of the poor of the city or town in which the parent 
has a settlement or by any other public relief officer. Proceed- 
ings under this act may be begun in the municipal, district or 
police court having jurisdiction of the place where the defendant 
lives, and if there be no such court, then in any municipal, 
district or police court in the county; or in the municipal, district 
or police court having jurisdiction of the place where the parent 
lives; and if there be no such court, then in any municipal, 
district or police court in the county. If no court has jurisdiction 
as aforesaid, proceedings may be begun before a trial justice in 
the county where the defendant or the parent lives. [Approved 
April 12, 1915. 

Chapter 184. 

An Act relative to the transfer of infirm prisoners. 

Chapter two hundred and twenty-five of the Revised Laws 
is hereby amended by striking out section eighty-one and insert- 
ing in place thereof the following: — Section 81. They may, 
with the consent of the governor and council, remove to the 
state farm a prisoner in the state prison who is aged or who is 
infirm in body or mind, and may at any time return him to 
the state prison. [Approved April 19, 1915. 

Chapter 208. 

An Act relative to the support of state charges in the 

state infirmary and the bridgewater state hospital. 

Section 1. Section eighty-tw^o of chapter five hundred and 

four of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and nine is hereby 

amended by inserting after the word "charges", in the sixth 



20 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

line, the following: — including insane inmates of the state 
infirmary and insane inmates of the Bridgewater state hospital 
not under orders of a court, — so as to read as follows: — Sec- 
tion 82. The price for the support of inmates, other than state 
charges, of the institutions mentioned in section fourteen, and 
of the Massachusetts School for the Feeble-Minded, shall be 
determined by the trustees of the respective institutions. The 
price for the support of state charges, including insane inmates 
of the state infirmary and insane inmates of the Bridgewater 
state hospital not under orders of a court, shall be determined 
by the state board of insanity at a sum not exceeding five 
dollars per week for each person, and may be recoyered by the 
treasurer and receiver general from such persons if of sufficient 
ability, or from any person or kindred bound by law to maintain 
them. The attorney-general shall upon request of the said 
board bring action therefor in the name of the treasurer and 
receiver general. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. [A])- 
proved April 28, 1915. 



THE STATE INSTITUTIONS. 

The State institutions under the supervision of the Board 
are: the State Infirmary at Tewksbury; the State Farm at 
Bridgewater; the Norfolk State Hospital; the Lyman School 
for Boys at Westborough; the Industrial School for Boys at 
Shirley; the State Industrial School for Girls at Lancaster; the 
Massachusetts Hospital School at Canton; the North Reading 
State Sanatorium; the Rutland State Sanatorium; the Lake- 
ville State Sanatorium; and the Westfield State Sanatorium. 

The supervisory powers of the Board over these institutions 
extend to the right of investigation and recommendation as to 
any matters relating to the institutions, but the administra- 
tion of each is vested in a separate Board of Trustees. 

One private charitable institution, the Hospital Cottages for 
Children at Baldwinville, is subject to the Board's visitation, 
under the provisions of Acts of 1914, chapter 762. This insti- 
tution has been aided by State appropriations, and has five 
members among its trustees who are appointed by the Gov- 
ernor. 

The State Infirmary and the State Farm are controlled by 
one Board of Trustees. Its membership is as follows: John B. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 21 

Tivnan, Salem, Chairman; Helen R. Smith, Newton; Leonard 
Huntress, Lowell; Galen L. Stone, Brookline; Nellie E. Talbot, 
Brookline; Francis W. Anthony, Haverhill; Dennis D. Sullivan, 
Middleborough. 

The Norfolk State Hospital for the care and treatment of 
inebriates is administered by the following Board of Trustees: 
W. Rodman Peabody, Cambridge, Chairman; Robert A. Woods, 
Boston; Philip R. Allen, Walpole; James J. Phelan, Boston; 
Frank L. Locke, ]\Ialden; Edwin Mulready, Rockland; Otho 
L. Schofield, M.D., Wellesley. 

The Trustees of Massachusetts Hospitals for Consumptives 
administer the four sanatoria, but have no powers over the 
tuberculosis wards of the State Lifirmary. The Board is con- 
stituted as follows: Arthur K. Stone, M.D., Boston, Chairman; 
Albert C. Getchell, Worcester; Charles J. Downey, M.D., 
Springfield; Sylvia B. Knowlton, Newton; Daniel L. Prender- 
gast, Brookline; Simon Swig, Taunton; George A. Dunn, 
Gardner. 

The three training or industrial schools fall under the control 
of the Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools. The 
Board is as follows: Carl Dreyfus, Boston, Chairman; James 
J. Sheehan, Peabody; Mary Josephine Bleakie, Brookline; 
Matthew Luce, Cohasset; John F. Scully, Arlington; Amy 
Ethel Taylor, Lexington; Charles M. Davenport, Boston; 
James W. McDonald, Marlborough; Lewis M. Palmer, South 
Framingham. 

The Massachusetts Hospital School is administered by the 
following Board of Trustees: Edward H. Bradford, ]M.D., Bos- 
ton, Chairman; Leonard W^ Ross, Mattapan, Secretary; W^alter 
C. Baylies, Taunton; William F. Fitzgerald, Brookline; Alfred 
S. Pinkerton, Worcester. 

In addition to the eleven State institutions which the Board 
supervises is Penikese Hospital, the Massachusetts hospital for 
the care and treatment of persons afflicted with leprosy. This 
institution is administered directly by the State Board of 
Charity. For the sake of uniformity and comparison all 
twelve institutions are grouped together in this report. 



22 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Numbers. 
The total number of cases under care in these institutions 
during the year was 23,969. Of the total number, 18,874 were 
males and 5,095 were females. Fourteen thousand twenty-two 
were received for hospital treatment; 2,363 were juvenile de- 
linquents; 6,719 were adult offenders, mostly chronic drunk- 
ards; and 1,770 were indigent persons, having no legal settle- 
ment and not included in the above classifications. Of the 
hospital cases 3,690 were suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis; 
1,739 were insane, including 905 at the State Farm who were 
criminally insane. 

Capacity. 

Four institutions, namely, the State Infirmary, the Lyman 
School and the sanatoria at Lakeville and Westfield, showed a 
marked excess in daily average attendance over normal capacity 
of plant. Normal capacity in this sense is taken to mean per- 
manent quarters for housing and care of inmates. One other 
sanatorium, that at North Reading, though its excess averages 
less than 5 patients, works under a great handicap due to 
pressure for hospital beds, the crowding in that department 
being far greater than in the pavilions. 

The Industrial School for Boys is in process of rapid grovrth 
in numbers. At the same time, there is not a corresponding 
increase in facilities. The request for tv\'o cottages made last 
year was not granted, so that at the present time the numbers 
are permanently in excess of quarters. This condition is at 
the time of this report bearing fruit in the persistent spread 
of diphtheria, v\'hich adequate facilities would undoubtedly have 
aided in checking at the time of outbreak. 

Overcrowding at the State Infirmary is worse than last year 
by the normal amount of increase in its population, as none 
of the several measures recommended to the Legislature for its 
relief has been adopted. 

The accompanying table indicates the fluctuations of daily 
attendance above and below the normal capacity for each insti- 
tution. 



Part LI GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



23 



Capacities of the Several State Charitable Institutions for the Fiscal Year 
ending November SO, 1915. 



INSTITUTION'S 


Normal 
Capacity 


Largest 
Number 
present 

at 

Any One 

Time 


Smallest 
Number 
present 

at 

Any One 

Time 


Daily 
Average 
Number 
present 

during 
the Year 


Increase 
of Daily 
Average 

over 
Normal 
Capacity 


Decrease 
of Daily 

Average 
over 

Normal 
Capacity 


State Infirmary .... 


2.336 


3,107 


2,341 


2,601.34 


265.34 


- 


State Farm . . . . 


3,213 


3,111 


2,611 


2,811.00 


- 


402.00 


Norfolk State Hospital 


270 


269 


176 


232.66 


- 


37.34 


Lyman School for Boys 


413 


479 


413 


442.00 


29.00 


- 


Industrial School for Boys 


240 


» 264 


230 


244.28 


4.28 


- 


Industrial School for Girls 


299 


291 


262 


281.46 


- 


17 54 


Massachusetts Hospital School 


300 


279 


193 


262.18 


- 


37.82 


Rutland State Sanatorium 


354 


355 


340 


349.00 


- 


5 00 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


194 


202 


192 


198.33 


4.33 


- 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


246 


270 


230 


257.02 


11.02 


- 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


229 


268 


245 


258.81 


29.81 


- 


Penikese Hospital 


19 


14 


11 


11.43 


- 


7 57 


Totals 


8,113 


8,909 


7,244 


7,949.51 


343.78 


507 27 



Cost of Maintenance. 
The combined appropriations for maintenance were $1,931," 
426.96. The total expenditures on the same account vv'ere 
SI, 926,459.67. Of the sum expended, 8712,458.54 was for 
salaries, wages and labor; all other expenses, 81,214,001.13. 
For the coming year the respective Boards of Trustees submit 
estimates for maintenance appropriations, as shown in Table L 
To the tabulation is added for better comparison the Board's 
own estimate for Penikese Hospital. Estimates for special pur- 
poses will be considered later in this report under each of the 
institutions separately. 



Comparative View of Movement of Population and of 

Expenditures. 
The movement of population in the twelve institutions men- 
tioned in the foregoing pages is shown in brief but comparative 
form in Table 11. Inmates are classified bv sex, while the dailv 



24 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

average attendance appears in a column adjoining the average 
number of officers and employees. The average number of 
persons employed, shown in this table, is obtained from an 
exact analysis of the pay rolls, reducing all employment to a 
basis of days. Table III. affords a comparative view of ex- 
penditures at all the institutions, classified as "current'' and 
"extraordinary." Tables II. and III. are drawn in accordance 
with the statistical form adopted by the National Conference 
of Charities and Correction, May 15, 1906. 



Part 1.1 GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



25 



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26 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 





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Part LI GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



27 









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28 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



o 

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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



29 















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30 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



The Institutions Severally. 
A brief statement relating to the general supervision of each 
institution will be followed by comparative and more detailed 
consideration of financial administration. 



The State Infirmary, Tewksbury. 
John H. Nichols, M.D., Superintendent. 

Numbers. 





Sane 


Insane 


Totals 


INMATES 




a 

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e 
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a 


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Number Dec. 1, 1914 . 


1,053 


265 


418 


1,736 


199 


534 


733 


1,252 


799 


418 


2,469 


Admitted during year . 


3,060 


711 


903 


4,674 


45 


56 


101 


3,105 


767 


903 


4,775 


Discharged during year . 


3,185 


631 


916 


4,732 


48 


85 


133 


3,233 


716 


916 


4,865 


Number November 30, 1915 . 


928 


345 


405 


1,678 


196 


505 


701 


1,124 


850 


405 


2,379 



Classification of discharges: deaths, 680; removals, 4,185. 
Number of maternity cases, 167; living births, 164. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $1,811,632.24. 
Normal capacity of plant, 2,336. Value per unit of capacity, 
S775.53. Provides almshouse and hospital care for indigent 
persons not chargeable for support to any city or town. During 
the year 7,244 persons have been under care, — 54 less than 
in 1914, and 289 more than in 1913. The largest daily census 
was 3,107, the smallest, 2,341, the daily average being 2,601.34. 
For the preceding year the corresponding figures were 2,761 
and 2,196, with a daily average of 2,428.64. 

Eight thousand three hundred seventeen cases, of which 
5,794 were males and 2,523 females, were treated in the general 
hospital wards. In this number were 1,178 cases of tubercu- 
losis (1,014 of which were cases of phthisis), 7 of diphtheria, 4 
of tj^phoid fever, 2 of scarlet fever, 57 of whooping cough, 118 
of measles, 1 of chicken pox. There was one case of African 
trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness) and two of pellagra. Of 
the 680 deaths, 267 were from tuberculosis. Of the 1,014 cases 
of pulmonary tuberculosis in the consumptive ward, 860 cases 
were males, 154 females. Of this number, 1 was discharged as 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 31 

disease arrested, 9 apparently arrested, 1 apparently cured, 51 
quiescent, 322 relieved, 248 died, 66 not relieved. 

Eight hundred thirty-one surgical operations were performed. 

Of the 167 births at this institution during the year, 88 were 
males and 79 were females. Of this number there were 164 
living births, namely, 85 males and 79 females. Among the 
mothers of these children, 67 were born in the United States, 
17 in Ireland, 5 in England, 27 in the British Provinces, 48 in 
other countries. For an account of this Board's work with 
mother and baby cases at this institution, see pages 181-184, 
post. 

The daily average number of insane patients Vvas 715. There 
were 70 deaths in this department. 

The superintendent reports satisfactory progress during the 
year in the treatment of syphilis, as last year. The work has 
been hampered by a failure of a sufficient supply of neo-sal- 
varsan, due to interruption of imports from Europe, so that 
mercury has had to be used for some cases as a substitute. 
Two hundred patients received this treatment. All others re- 
quiring treatment received mercury by various methods in 
conjunction with the iodides. These latter cases required an 
appreciably longer stay in the hospital wards than those treated 
with the arsenical preparations, supplemented by mercury. It 
is difficult, however, to keep a large number of the individuals 
in the hospital long enough to undergo the thorough mercurial 
treatment, for the patients become restless and are apt to 
abscond before the complete treatment has been given. The 
total number treated during the three previous years was 757, 
making a grand total of 957 who have been given this treat- 
ment for syphilis at the Infirmary during the years 1912-15. 
There were 34 cases of drug habit, 32 of whom were given the 
modified Townes-Lambert treatment. The other two received 
gradual reduction. 

Of the 4,775 new admissions, 2,331, or 48.8 per cent, were 
from Boston. Those native in Massachusetts numbered 1,091, 
or 22.8 per cent. Two thousand eight hundred eighty were 
foreign born, representing 33 different countries. Nine hun- 
dred three, or 18.9 per cent, were under twenty-one years of 
age. 



32 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

The institution is very much overcrowded. The dangers 
resulting from this condition have been thrown into bold relief 
by two series of occurrences this year: first, the threat of fire, 
and second, the quick spread of epidemics. 

Three fires have broken out during the year, one of these so 
threatening that assistance was sought from the city of Lowell. 
This latter ^e broke out among stores of clothing in a baggage 
room located in the basement of the men's house. The alarm 
was given at 2 a.m., at a time when 300 men were sleeping in 
the building. As usual in an infirmary population, many of 
these men were unable to help themselves. Due to quickness, 
loyalty and efficiency of the staff, no person was injured and 
the property loss was not above S4,000. In some portions of 
the institution where overcrowding has forced a lower degree 
of preparation against emergencies, this happy escape might 
never have been effected. The warning is not for the trus- 
tees. They have been awake to the danger, as shown by their 
repeated requests made to the Legislature that better classifi- 
cation be brought about so as to permit care elsewhere of many 
cases, notably the children, who should not be sent to the 
State Infirmary. Failing such classification the trustees have 
sought added facilities for housing, and these requests, in so 
far as they relate to adult patients, have been supported by 
the State Board of Charity. 

Another instance in which over population has scored heavily 
against efficient medical care is shown by the epidemics which 
have made headway during the year. One of these, whooping 
cough, reached IIS cases, and resulted in 6 deaths; another, 
measles, reached 57 cases, with no fatalities. The presence of 
these highly infectious diseases is almost guaranteed by the 
cramped facilities for the reception of cases and the difficulties 
of quarantine. During the year 903 persons under twenty- 
one years of age became inmates of the Infirmary. The average 
daily number of minors was 445. At all times of the year 
there may be found on the daily list large numbers of children 
recorded as "well.'' This is due to the fact that though not 
ill, they have been exposed during their residence to some 
infectious disease, and must remain there in quarantine until 
the danger of infection has passed. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 33 

About 60 per cent of this large group of minors are State 
wards who have been sent to the Infirmary for medical treat- 
ment, there being no other place to which they can be sent. 
Better classification indicates a separate hospital at some 
place removed from this institution for adults, in which minors 
may have temporary care and medical treatment. This Board 
has recommended such an institution to two Legislatures, and 
repeats the request this year. 

About 35 per cent of the children found at the Infirmary 
from day to day are feeble-minded. This institution has no 
facilities for their care nor for such educational development 
as their condition may render possible. They should be placed 
in an institution for the feeble-minded. The State has two 
such institutions, now housing about 2,500 inmates, but they 
are filled beyond capacity and more than 1,000 persons are 
waiting admittance. In this situation this Board recommended 
last year that a third school for the feeble-minded be estab- 
lished. A beginning was made. This year it recommends 
completion of the plan for establishing such a school. 

Some children there must always be at the Infirmary. Some 
must come there with their parents; many — from 175 to 190 
each year — are born there ; but a reduction of their numbers 
to a normal average would lower the mortality, better the con- 
dition of children so removed, and enlarge greatly the oppor- 
tunity for that higher efiiciency which the staff of the State 
Infirmary struggles to maintain against such heavy odds. 

There are two important tendencies in the year's work which 
call for special mention. One is the extension of industries 
with corresponding increase in economic and therapeutic values; 
the other is the growth of laboratory and clinical work looking 
to a future condition in which the institution will serve not 
only its inmates and the State, but the whole of mankind as 
well, through an increase of medical knowledge developed by 
research. 

This latter group of activities is furthered greatly by the new 
laboratory building occupied this year for the first time. It is 
more nearly possible now than ever before to organize the lab- 
oratory work upon a thoroughgoing basis. Improved biological 
methods have been introduced. Of especial importance have 



34 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

been the complete fixation tests for serum diagnosis of syphilis 
(Wassermann) , gonorrhoea (Schwartz) and infantile paralysis 
now in use. The last-named test is in process of development 
by the Infirmary staff. 

The institution industries above mentioned serve as a means 
of exercise and occupation for patients Ts'hose condition permits. 
As there are almost no able-bodied inmates, the scope of these 
activities is much circumscribed. Nevertheless, the merest 
mention of details will show what a great advance has been 
made here over that time-honored system of picking okum, 
which still makes up the pastime of many institutions for de- 
pendents among civilized communities. The Infirmary knits 
all the stockings vrorn by the inmates and all the knit caps. 
It makes all the harnesses used by the farm department. It 
makes and repairs all its own scrub brushes, hand brushes, 
baskets, door mats, rugs, carpets, brooms, shirts, overalls, 
jumpers, corduroys and khaki suits. It makes a large quantity 
of towels, and weaves a large storehouse supply of cloth annu- 
ally. Practically all the clothing used by the vromen, children 
and infants is made in the institution; also all mattresses, bed- 
ding and linen hospital supplies. And this makes no mention 
of the metal and wooden wares. The workrooms turn out all 
the children's cribs, bassinets, chairs, tables, cabinets and 
bureaus; and practically all the tin ware and sheet metal stock. 

In view of the fact that the great majority of the inmates 
are hospital cases, the extensive nature of the industries over 
and above the usual activities of kitchen, bakery, laundry and 
other maintenance functions argues a high degree of organiza- 
tion in the industrial department and an admirable interrela- 
tion between this branch and the medical staff. 

With an appropriation of $493,010.98, a total of 8493,007.08 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, 8172,783.13 was for salaries, wages and 
labor; all other expenses, 8320,223.95. Weekly per capita cost 
of maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, 83,620. Total receipts from all sources 
other than the State treasury, 823,147.97. Net cost of main- 
tenance to the Commonwealth, 8469,859.10. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 35 

of inmates, 1 to 6.9. For detailed analysis of receipts and 
expenditures, see pages 120-138. The trustees estimate that 
$536,161 will be necessary for maintenance in 1916. (See 
table, page 25.) 

In the development of the plant matters of special improve- 
ment should be noted, as follows: the completion of the patho- 
logical laboratory and the completion of the improvements to 
the administration building. The hot-water circulating system 
is nearly completed, and the greater part of it has been in use 
since early fall, effecting a long-needed improvement in all parts 
of the institution. The new home for nurses, under progress, 
is about half completed. 

The Infirmary Trustees ask the follov/ing special appropria- 
tions, all of which, with the exception of the building for 100 
children, are approved by this Board: — 

1. Mechanical handling of coal $10,600 00 

2. Building for children (accommodation for 100) . 79,690 84 

3. Barracks, tv/o buildings (accommodation for 100 each) . 37,976 00 

4. Changes in pumping station 6,000 00 

5. Real estate 4,200 00 



$138,466 84 



Items 1, 2 and 5 are repetitions from other years, while 
items 3 and 4 are new requests this year. 

The proposal to construct quarters for 100 children is dis- 
approved again this year, as an improper development of the 
Infirmary. 

The request for the barracks is to provide housing for the 
excessive numbers that have to be cared for through the win- 
ter months. The capacity of the men's building is inadequate, 
and the serious overcrowding caused thereby is a menace to 
health and comfort of convalescents, — the old and feeble cases 
who occupy the building. 

The electrification of the pumping station is requested for 
the reason that one-half of the old equipment needs replace- 
ment and in order to obtain a more continuous flow, and, by 
a more flexible equipment, to be able to maintain a more con- 
stant control of the pressure in the water supply. 



36 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



The items for hot-water circulating system and for improved 
facilities for handling coal are the result of long and thorough 
study by engineers of the most efficient and most economic 
plan for securing heat, light and power. 

The purchase of the plot of land at the gateway of the insti- 
tution would take advantage of a present opportunity to add 
to the plant a parcel of land which otherwise the State will in 
the nature of things add to its holdings at some future time, 
and at a probable increase in cost. 

The State Farm at Bridgeioater. 

HoLLis IM. Blackstone, Superintendent. 

Numbers. 



INMATES 


Pacpers Pp.iscxers 


Criminal 

IXSAXE 


Totals 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


All Males 


Number December 1, 1914 
Admitted during year . 
Discharged during year . 
Number November 30, 1915 . 


630 
1,127 
1,136 

621 


1 
12 
13 


- 
631 

1,139 

1,149 

621 


1,347 
3,758 
3,818 
1,287 


146 
563 
536 
173 


1,493 
4,321 
4,354 
1,460 


807 
98 
79 

826 


2,931 
5,558 
5,582 
2,907 



Classification of discharges: deaths, 148; removals, 5,434. 



Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $1,761,804.69. 
Normal capacity of plant, 3,213. Value per unit of capacity, 
$548.34. 

Provides custodial care for persons of both sexes committed 
by the courts for drunkenness or vagrancy; also almshouse 
care for indigent persons not chargeable to any city or town; 
and hospital care for insane male convicts. Persons committed 
for drunkenness are in almost all cases chronic drunkards. 

During the year, 8,489 persons have been cared for, — 574 
more than last year, and 612 more than in 1913. Largest 
daily census, 3,111; smallest, 2,611; daily average, 2,811. Of 
the whole number under care, 5,814 were prisoners, 1,770 were 
paupers and 905 were insane convicts. The total number of 
commitments was 4,321, of which 3,613, or 83.6 per cent, were 
for drunkenness. Of these 4,321 persons committed, 1,084, or 
25 per cent, were returned for violation of parole; 3,012, or 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



37 



69.7 per cent, of all these new commitments had served time 
at the State Farm before. Of all commitments, 33.4 per cent 
were made from Boston. A comparative classification of all 
commitments, showing data for nine years, follows: — 



Classification of Commitments. 



Cause 


1806 


1907 


190S 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


Drunkenness . 


3,404 


2,900 


3,177 


3,417 


3,783 


4,272 


3,945 


4.136 


3,589 


3,813 


Tramping 


113 


78 


144 


99 


107 


90 


67 


66 


113 


76 


Vagrancy 


295 


263 


505 


359 


350 


419 


381 


331 


395 


467 


All others 


108 


93 


120 


124 


133 


ISO 


129 


148 


156 


165 


Totals . . 


3,920 


3,334 


3,946 


3,999 


4,373 


4,961 


4,522 


4,681 


4,253 


4,321 



The total number of persons leaving the institution during 
the year, whether by death, discharge or release on parole, was 
5,582. The deaths numbered 148. 

It is to be noted that though the total number of persons 
under care during the year in this institution exceeds by 574 
the number cared for in 1914, the number of commitments for 
drunkenness increased but 24. The whole prison department 
shows an increase for the year of 68, and the number of de- 
pendents admitted to the almshouse department has increased 
by 185. 

Under present laws (Revised Laws, chapter 85, sections 37-39, 
Acts of 1904, chapter 216) commitments to this institution are 
for an indeterminate period, not to exceed one year in cases of 
drunkenness and two years for all other oitences. The two 
chief classes committed are drunkards and vagrants. 

The State Board of Charity is charged with the duty of ad- 
ministering a system of parole for these prisoners. They are 
empowered to impose such terms upon the parole as they deem 
proper, and may return any prisoner who violates its regulations 
thus made. If so returned, the time during which the prisoner 
has enjoyed parole shall not be counted as part of his term of 
sentence. 

The rules now applicable to parole permit the release of any 
prisoner on good behavior at the expiration of three months. 



38 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

If he continues under parole for nine months without violation 
he is automatically discharged. If he is returned for violation 
he is given another trial at the end of four months from the date 
of his return. Five months on parole thereafter will discharge 
his sentence. But a return from second trial on parole forfeits 
.a right to further trial. The prisoner must serve out his sen- 
tence. 

In addition to the routine operation of this system the Board 
has for many years followed the practice of entertaining peti- 
tions for special release when based upon urgent or meritorious 
reason. Diiring the year 516 such petitions have been consid- 
ered and acted upon; 183 were refused, and 333 were released 
on parole. 

Another feature of the parole system is the corps of volun- 
teer parole visitors. This is a body of men, some 43 in num- 
ber, serving the State without compensation, who are willing 
to take a friendly interest in the prisoner and act for the 
Board in keeping a close relationship to him while on parole. 
The plan works badly for lack of a paid supervising parole 
visitor who shall study all cases and organize the efforts of the 
volunteers. Provision for such an ofHcer has been sought in 
several succeeding years, but has not thus far been secured. 
Yet, if the system of paroling chronic drunkards and vagrants 
from the State Farm is to operate to the public good, something 
more in the way of an organization must be effected. The 
Board believes that this can be brought about only through a 
paid agent. 

Out of an appropriation of $384,600, a total of $384,587.28 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, 8118,898.25 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $265,689.03. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, $2.57. Total receipts from all sources other 
than the State treasury, $18,410.29. Net cost of maintenance 
to the Commonwealth, $366,176.99. Ratio of daily average 
number of persons employed to daily average number of in- 
mates, 1 to 14.4. The trustees estimate that $393,000 will be 
necessary for m.aintenance in 1916. (See table, page 25.) For 
detailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 120-138. 



Part I. 



GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



39 



A number of improvements under construction have been 
completed during the past year. The water supply was not 
completed till November, 1915, but was used to some extent 
during the year 1914. Recording machinery was installed in 
the power plant in March, 1915, partially used in 1914, and 
has been in full use since completion. Valuable results are 
indicated, but it is too early to offer data on the measurements. 
Consolidating heating apparatus was completed in November, 
1915, and is in full use. 

For the coming year the trustees ask the following special 
appropriations : — 

1. Colony building $8,000 00 

2. Additional office rooms, fireproof storage and vaults . 3,500 00 

3. Additional sewage disposal 15,000 00 

4. Additional ice storage and refrigeration: — 

Addition to service building, 1,100 square 

feet at $2 ...... . 82,200 00 

Refrigerators built in 1,000 00 

Rebuilding two old wood ice houses of 600 
tons each, in concrete, to contain 2,200 
tons 1,300 00 



5. Housing farm macliines, tools and implements, rebuilding 

an old piggery building 140 by 30 feet, now in wood, in 
concrete and plastic 

6. Additional high-tension electric power unit, consisting of 

100 kilowatt, 2,300 volt generator direct, connected to 
high-speed steam engine, 160 horse power 



4,500 00 



2,000 00 



3.500 00 



836,500 00 



Item 1 is for improvement in classification of inmates and a 
more convenient and economic base for reclaiming and tilling 
the State's land in the vicinity. It is proposed to establish a 
colony unit on new lands about two miles north of main plant. 

Item 2 is for an absolutely fireproof building to contain 
ofiices for medical director, 2 assistant physicians, 5 clerks and 
stenographer; also fireproof vaults for all books and records 
of the department. 

The request for additional sewage filtration beds is advised 
by the chief engineer of the State Department of Health and 



40 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

the expert engineer who is superintendent of the city of Brock- 
ton sand filtration system. 

Additional ice storage and refrigeration for cooling and storing 
meat, eggs and fruit provides an addition to service plant, 
including refrigerators built in and additional storage of 1,000 
tons of ice. 

These estimates are approved by the State Board of Charity. 

Norfolk State Hospital. 
Irwin H. Neff, M.D., Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 8361,820.58. 
Normal capacity of plant, 270. Value per unit of capacity, 
$1,340.07. 

Provides care and treatment for inebriates and users of drugs 
in cases not deemed incurable; also detention colony for non- 
criminal chronics. 

This institution was opened for the admission of patients 
June 1, 1914, at which time all the inebriate patients at the 
Foxborough State Hospital were transferred to the Norfolk 
State Hospital. The present report, therefore, affords the first 
opportunity to give figures based upon a full fiscal year. 

During the year 1,795 cases have been cared for, representing 
1,275 separate individuals. Of the whole number, 230 were in 
residence at the beginning of the year. The remaining 1,302 
cases were admitted during the year, while 1,277 were dis- 
charged, leaving 255 at the close of the year. There were 4 
deaths. The total number of admissions include 77 who were 
returned from visits or leave of absence, the actual admissions 
being 1,228. Of this number, 997, or 81 per cent, were volun- 
tary, while 231, or 19 per cent, were committed. 

Nine hundred seventeen, or 75 per cent, of the admissions 
for the year were alcoholics, and 311, or 25 per cent, were drug 
inebriates. 

The daily average number of inm^ates was 232.66; largest 
daily census, 269; smallest, 176. 

This institution suffers a heavy handicap due to a shortage 
of beds. The plant is designed on a unit basis of 500 patients. 
All administration, service and equipment is developed to sup- 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 41 

ply such a unit, but sufficient bed capacity to make up the 
maximum has thus far been denied. Failure of the Executive 
in 1913 and 1914 to approve legislative grants of buildings to 
house patients has proved exceedingly expensive to the State 
as shown by the weekly per capita cost of S10.79. The same 
overhead facilities now applied to the care of 233 patients are 
capable of caring for 500 patients with only slight increases in 
maintenance outlays. From the point of view of the public, 
failure to supply the needed beds creates a great hardship, as 
the need for more hospital care of inebriates is urgent. 

The plant when developed to the limit of existing appropri- 
ations will house 400 inmates. The trustees ask this year for 
a dormitory to house 100 men. If this is granted the original 
unit will be complete, and the per capita, it is estimated, will 
fall below S6. 

The most important development in the activities of this 
institution has been the out-patient work. In April, 1915, an 
office for this purpose was opened at Springfield. This new 
outpost is already performing for the western part of the State 
what the Boston office is doing for the eastern half. Within 
the field of its activity are the courts, the probation officers 
and the local public and private relief agencies. The trustees 
are thus reaching out of their institution not only in the direc- 
tion of after-care of inmates on parole, but also toward the 
classification of candidates before admission. In this latter 
respect they seek to cure a major defect in our legal system of 
disposing of offenders, namely, the lack of some method of 
study and classification that can be brought to bear in aid of 
the court at or before the time of commitment. Norfolk State 
Hospital is not designed to care for the feeble-minded, yet they 
come by commitment because there is no w^orking system appli- 
cable to the court proceedings by which the presence of mental 
defect can be ascertained and its relationship to the defendant's 
condition of inebriety determined. Approximately 20 per cent 
of all the younger men who reach the hospital are of this type. 
The group of commitments who are hopelessly chronic and far 
advanced in years, often mentally infirm, is also large, though 
these cases are ineligible for Norfolk and should be provided 
for at the State Farm. 



42 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

By seeking to assist the courts through classification before 
commitment, the trustees are helping to close this gap which 
exists between our judicial process and our systems of care, 
custody and relief. Incidentally their activities demonstrate 
anew the truth that the institution cannot stand singly and 
still perform the most effective service. It is never more than 
one stage in a process in which pre-institution analysis and 
after-institution care are quite as important as the intra-insti- 
tution activities themselves. 

Out of an appropriation of 8133,933.67 a total of §131,635.38 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, 847,420.20 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, 884,215.18. Weekly per capita cost of main- 
tenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, 810.79. 

Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
81,991.14. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
8129,644.24. Ratio of daily average number of persons em- 
ployed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 3. The 
trustees estimate that 8131,810.09 will be necessary for main- 
tenance in 1916. (See table, page 25.) For detailed analysis 
of receipts and expenditures, see pages 120-138. 

The trustees request the following special appropriations for 
the coming year: — 

1. Dormitory building for men 836,000 00 

2. Barn and vehicle storage 4,000 00 

3. Outside wiring 500 00 

4. Cottage for women 14,000 00 



854,500 00 



The items for stable and wiring represent a step in the com- 
pletion of the standard unit on the administration side. Of 
the two items for buildings, that for the women's cottage is 
not only the repetition of a request made last year and the 
year before, but this year appears to be the only way of 
escape from the inconsistent position in which the trustees 
have been placed by statute. Chapter 73, General Acts of 
1915, authorized the commitm.ent of women to Norfolk State 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 43 

Hospital, and gave the trustees no power to refuse admittance. 
But there have thus far been no facilities for housing female 
inmates. The fundamental reasons for such provision should 
be sufficient in themselves. They are greatly reinforced by this 
new fact. 

The dormitory for 100 men seeks to provide for the non- 
criminal but confirmed inebriates. The dormitory plan of 
housing, appropriate to this use, permits construction at an 
estimated maximum of S360 per patient, including all equip- 
ment. The request is repeated from last year. 

All of the foregoing estimates are approved by the State 
Board of Charity. 

THE STATE TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

The Lyman School for Boys at Westborough, the Industrial 
School for Boys at Shirley, and the Industrial School for Girls 
at Lancaster are the three industrial schools provided by the 
State for juvenile delinquents. They are administered by a 
single Board of Trustees known as the Trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts Training Schools, with offices at the State House, 
Boston. 

Boys under fifteen years of age may be committed to the 
Lyman School, and under eighteen years of age to the school 
at Shirley. Girls under seventeen go to the institution at Lan- 
caster. All persons committed remain under the control of 
the trustees during minority. For greater efficiency in admin- 
istration, the Lyman School cares for boys under fifteen, while 
those over that age go to Shirley. 

The total number of persons under care in these three insti- 

utions during the year was 2,363. Of these, 1,152 were boys 

under fifteen, all at Lyman School, 695 were boys fifteen and 

over, at Shirley, and 516 were girls under seventeen, cared for 

at Lancaster. 

In the three schools there were, at the beginning of the year, 
975 inmates, namely, 693 boys and 282 girls. One thousand 
three hundred eighty-eight were received during the year, and 
1,378 went out either by discharge or upon parole, viz., 1,124 
boys and 254 girls, leaving 985 on November 30, 1915. 

As noted last year, the population of these three schools is 



44 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

on the increase, a fact which has forced the trustees to repeat 
the request of last year for new cottages. 

The combined appropriations for the maintenance of the three 
schools totaled 8286,700. On this account, §286,539.88 was 
expended. Subtracting all receipts from sources other than the 
State treasury, the net cost of maintenance to the Common- 
wealth was 8284,709.49. Details of administration and cost 
are considered under each school separately, as follows: — 

Lymax School for Boys, Westborough. 
Elmer L. Coffeen, Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 8487,715.24. 
Normal capacity, 413. Value per unit of capacity, 81,180.91. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent 
boys under fifteen years of age. Cottage plan. 

During the year 1,152 cases have been under care, repre- 
senting 894 separate individuals. This total number of cases 
is 90 more than in 1914 and 103 more than in 1913. The 
number in the school at the beginning of the year was 458; 
admissions numbered 694; discharges, 674; remainder at the 
close of the year, 478. The daily average number of inmates 
was 442, — 4.31 less than in 1914. 

The list of causes of admission in the 694 cases received dur- 
ing the year was as follows: absconders returned, 89; assault, 
1; breaking and entering, 58; carrying firearms, 2; delinquent 
child, 85; larceny, 83; returned or transferred from other insti- 
tutions, not penal, 38; returned from place of parole or board, 
278; transferred by the State Board of Charity, 24; stubborn- 
ness, 30; setting fires, 2; trespassing, 1; vagrancy, 3. Two 
hundred eighty-nine of the foregoing cases were committed by 
the courts. Of this number, 173 had been arrested before and 
64 had been inmates of other institutions. Eleven per cent 
were of American parentage, 52 per cent of foreign parentage, 
26 per cent of mixed parentage, and 11 per cent were unknown 
Seven of these boys were foreign born, while 282 were born ir 
the United States. 

Industrial activities at this institution have increased during 
the year in two important respects, namely, the shoe shop and 
the printing plant. The new shoe machinery equipment au- 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 45 

thorized this year now makes it possible to train boys in the 
use of modern shoe machinery, and by this means to fit them 
for a trade against the time of their discharge. It also makes 
it possible to manufacture all the shoes used by the Lyman 
School and the school at Shirley. The printing department 
now prints all the forms used by the school in addition to the 
school periodical bulletin. Late in the summer a second-hand 
No. 8 Cottrell press, donated to the school by the Dennison 
Manufacturing Company, was placed in operation. This ma- 
chine extends the equipment very materially, and opens the 
way to better instruction of the boys in the printing trade. It 
means also some saving in expenditures for printing. This 
shop turned out several boys during the year who were readily 
placed at the trade they had learned. 

The hospital list has been uniformly small throughout the 
year. No epidemics and no alarming number of colds have 
occurred. The farm has, however, suffered a heavy loss due to 
foot and mouth disease, which took 60 pigs. The year closed 
with no further alarm from this cause. 

This favorable condition of health is the more noteworthy 
in view of the chronic overcrowding in all the cottages. The 
normal bed capacity of the plant is 413. The average number 
of inmates during the year was 442. 

The year opened with a large increase in numbers compared 
with the previous year, and this tendency prevailed during the 
period covered by this report. As a result the crowded condi- 
tion at times became acute, and relief was obtained only by 
placing boys at board. 

As it is reasonable to anticipate a steady increase in com- 
mitments, plans must be made to care for boys either by en- 
larging the accommodations on the present site, in which case 
the school will inevitably grow to an unweildy size and lose 
to a corresponding degree the advantages of personal expert 
attention and leadership, or by establishing another school for 
this class to serve the more remote section of the Common- 
wealth. The theory that prefers the cottage to the congregate 
system may be effectively defeated by multiplying cottages. 

The boys committed to the school are in most cases victims 
of unfortunate environment, and the purpose of the school is 
to house them under healthy, normal conditions, and give them 



46 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

that degree of wise care that will eradicate false conceptions 
of life and restore them to the condition befitting boys of their 
tender years. 

First of all, the boys' physical condition is surveyed and all 
handicaps are removed as far as medical skill and right living 
can serve. He is assigned to a cottage where, under the over- 
sight of the master and matron, he becomes a member of the 
family with his own possessions, privileges and duties. Like 
other boys of his age he must attend school and pursue the 
ordinary academic course just as do his contemporaries in the 
neighboring town. 

In addition he has an opportunity for vocational training in 
carpentry, blacksmithing, printing, electrical work, firing, laun- 
dering, baking, painting, masonry, dairying and tailoring. Dur- 
ing the long vacation all the boys learn something of the proc- 
esses of farming. 

^Yhen the boy has earned the required number of credits his 
case is considered by the trustees and officers and he is put in 
charge of a parole visitor, to be returned to his home if condi- 
tions are such that he can have a fair chance to succeed. If 
his home is not of the required standard he is placed elsewhere, 
and under the guidance and supervision of his visitor he takes 
his position in the community and begins his efforts for self- 
support and independent control. If he succeeds he finally 
wins his discharge. If, on the contrary, he is unable to make 
his way and fails to hold his place in the world he is returned 
to the school for supplementary training, to be tried again 
when time is opportune. 

The very young boys, however, are not received in the school 
proper but are cared for in the Berlin and Phelps cottages, 
situated, respectively, seven miles and one-half mile from 
Westborough, where the program is more simple and the num- 
bers comparatively small. These lads are not usually held 
more than six months before they are boarded out. 

The mentally defective and backward boys have had special 
classes provided for them, and attend school during the fore- 
noon when the remainder of the boys are at work, with dis- 
tinct advantage to themselves and the normals, whose progress 
is no longer retarded by their presence in the classroom. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BO.\RD. 



47 



With an appropriation of $123,500, a total of 8123,497.98 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, 850,761.92 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, 872,736.06. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, 85.30. Total receipts from all sources other 
than, the State treasury, 81,408.38. Net cost of maintenance 
to the Commonwealth, 8122,089.60. Ratio of daily average 
number of persons employed to daily average number of in- 
mates, 1 to 5.2. The trustees estimate that 8127,690 will be 
necessary for maintenance in 1916. (See table, page 25.) For 
detailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 120-138. 

The total expended out of appropriations for special purposes 
was $7,853.08. 

The Legislature of 1915 granted a special appropriation for 
a new boiler, engine and electrical apparatus as an enlargement 
of the power plant (817,000), and also two small sums for shoe 
machinery and equipment in the printing shop. By the close 
of the year all of these improvements had been completed and 
v\-ere in use. The two requests of the trustees for enlargement 
of the bed capacity of the plant, namely, one new cottage 
(822,000) and the purchase and renovation of a dwelling for 
additional housing (815,000), were refused. The new cottage 
had been asked for the year before. For the coming year the 
trustees repeat their former requests for certain additions to 
the dairy and improvements of the farm buildings, together 
with the estimate for purchase of land and dwellings to be 
converted into a cottage. The list asked for is as follows: — ' 



1. For a milk house and creamery building . . . . 

2. For dairy equipment 

3. For purchase of the Bailey place adjoining school, and for 

remodeling, furnishing and equipping house to accom- 
modate 35 boj's and attendants, and connecting it with 
the school heating, lighting and sewerage systems 

4. For extension and repair of cow barn . 

5. For laundry machinery .... 

6. For fireproof record vault and fittings 

7. For changes in administration building 

8. For fire escapes for five buildings 



81,800 00 


700 00 


15,000 00 


1,850 00 


2,300 00 


1,450 00 


1,300 00 


1,300 00 


$25,700 00 



48 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

As to the need of the additional beds enough has already 
been said. Either further provision for housing inmates should 
be made at this institution, or the trustees should be empowered 
to refuse commitments until such time as quarters can be pro- 
vided. Permanent overcrowding, aside from its hindrance to 
discipline, is likely sooner or later to result in accident, epi- 
demic or other misfortune which will endanger the lives of the 
inmates. 

The other requests are broken into small sums, since they 
represent minor though very necessary extensions and improve- 
ments of the plant. All these estimates are approved by the 
State Board of Charity. 

• Industrial School for Boys, Shirley. 
George P. Campbell, Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $273,280.55. 
Normal capacity of plant, 240. Value per unit of capacity, 
$1,138.67. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over 
fifteen and under twenty-one years of age. Only boys under 
eighteen may be admitted. 

During the year 695 cases have been cared for, representing 
497 separate individuals. This total number of cases is 96 
more than in the preceding year. The number in the school 
at the beginning of the year was 235. Admissions numbered 
460; discharges, 450; remainder at the close of the year, 245. 
The largest daily census was 264; the smallest, 230; daily 
average, 244.28. 

The list of causes of admission in the 460 cases received dur- 
ing the year was as follows: absconders returned, 99; arson, 2; 
assault, 2; assault and battery, 6; assault with a dangerous 
weapon, 1; assault with intent to rape, 1; assault with intent 
to rob, 2; attempted larceny, 2; attempting to break and enter, 
1; breaking and entering, 25: breaking and entering and lar- 
ceny, 34; breaking and entering and receiving stolen goods, 1; 
breaking glass, 2; delinquency, 16; disturbing the peace, 1; 
drunkenness, 3; forgery, 1; idle and disorderly, 5; indecent 
assault, 1; larceny, 65; larceny in a building, 1; larceny from 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 49 

the person, 3; lewdness and lasciviousness, 1; returned after 
leave of absence, 10; returned from place or parole, 122; re- 
turned or transferred from institutions not penal, 11; riding 
freight without leave, 1; running away, 6; stubbornness, 29; 
vagrancy, 6. 

Two hundred eighteen of the foregoing cases were committed 
by the courts. Of the boys thus committed 153 had been ar- 
rested before and 60 had been inmates of other institutions. 
Thirty-one, or 14.2 per cent, were foreign born and 3 were 
unknown. The remaining 184, or 84.4 per cent, were born in 
the United States. The average population of 244.28 exceeds 
the average of the preceding year by 29.39. 

This is another overcrowded institution. The population 
almost always equals all the available capacity and frequently 
exceeds it. In August, September and October there were 
approximately 20 inmates each day for whom there was no 
proper and permanent accommodation. The result is best seen 
in the number of runaways. About 15 per cent of all the boys 
in the school last year ran away. The causes for these lapses 
from right conduct are various, but serious overcrowding with 
its resulting impairment of discipline must be taken as a major 
cause. Another indication is the disciplinary cottage which 
has had practically its full quota of 40 boys throughout the 
year. A third result of such overcrowding is the added danger 
of epidemic. In July two boys were found to be diphtheria 
carriers and were isolated. By October there were three cases 
of diphtheria, and the school building had to be taken as an 
isolation ward. In November there were two cases and one 
suspect. Because of crowded conditions it was found especially 
difficult to search out the cause of the infection. In spite of 
all efforts the disease has spread, and has, since the close of 
the year and at the time of going to press with this report, 
reached the proportions of an epidemic, with some 28 cases. 

Out of an appropriation of S80,700, a total of 880,542.37 was 
expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, 832,964.04 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, 847,578.33. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, 86.314. Total receipts from all sources 



50 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

other than the State treasury, S222.86. Net cost of mainte- 
nance to the Commonwealth, 880,319.51. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number 
of inmates, 1 to 4.58. The trustees estimate that $84,888 will 
be necessary for maintenance in 1916. (See table, page 25.) 
For detailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 
120-138. 

To relieve the overcrowding and to develop the plant toward 
a proper unit, the trustees asked at the beginning of the year 
for two cottages each to house 30 boys, and also for a central 
administration and assembly building and a storehouse. The 
cottages were refused. One ell of a proposed administration 
building was authorized and the storehouse also was granted. 

Work has been pushed on these two improvements, the boys 
doing much of the work on the storehouse. By the close of 
the year both were nearing completion, but neither was yet 
ready for occupancy. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following esti- 
mates, with a request for special appropriations covering the 
same : — 

1. For completion of central building, providing chapel, 

schoolrooms, central offices, fireproof vault, assembling 
and exercising room and for equipment .... 

2. For a new cottage for 30 boys and attendants and for 

furnishing, heating and equipping the same . 

3. For relocating and renovating a Shaker cottage for use 

as a residence by an employee 

4. For extension of sidewalks 

5. For a lumber shed 

6. For a water system 



No further comment is necessary upon the request for an 
additional cottage. The central administration building is the 
repetition of last year's request so far as it was refused. The 
need of such a building is readily apparent and was recognized 
in last year's grant. 

The estimate for water system seeks to take advantage of an 
abundant water supply which is readily available, thus reducing 



876,700 00 


24,500 00 


1,545 00 

500 00 

950 00 

16,000 00 


§120,195 00 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 51 

maintenance cost and rendering the institution independent of 
private contracts in this department. The State Board of 
Charity approves all the foregoing estimates. 

IxDrsTPJAL School for Girls, Lancaster. 
Amy F. Everall, Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 8462,6S5.30. 
Normal capacity of plant, 299. Value per unit of capacity, 
Sl,o47.44. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent 
girls under twenty-one years of age. Only girls under seven- 
teen may be committed. 

During the year 516 cases have been under care. This total 
is 44 less than in 1914 and 47 more than in 1913. The number 
in the school at the beginning of the year was 282; admissions 
during the year, 234; discharged, including all persons going 
out of the school, 254; remaining November 30, 1915, 262. The 
largest daily census was 291; smallest, 262; daily average, 
281.46. 

The list of causes of admission in the 234 cases received at 
the school during the year was as follows: a delinquent, 2; 
delinquency, 1; delinquent child, 4; delinquent and stubborn, 
1; for rest, 2; fornication, 9; from visit to her home, 3; from 
witness at court, 4; from temporary place, 1; idle and disorderly, 
10; idle and disorderly person, 1; idle and vicious, 1; immoral 
conduct, 27; illness, 3; larceny, 5; lewdness, 2; lewd and las- 
civious, 2; lewd person in speech and behavior, 1; leading an 
idle, vicious life, 2; lewd, wanton and lascivious, 4; lewd, wanton 
and lascivious in speech and behavior, 1; runaway, 28; stub- 
bornness, 19; stubborn child, 19; stubborn and disobedient 
child, 3; stubborn and disorderly, 1; transferred from hospital, 
17; unsatisfactory in place, 4; visit to school, 54; waywardness, 
2; wayward and delinquent child, 1. 

Of the 254 girls discharged or released during the year 125 
were released on parole to relatives or to families for employ- 
ment; on parole to parents or relatives, 22; on parole to other 
families to attend school, earning wages, 2; on parole to other 
families to attend school, being boarded, 1; to attend school. 



52 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

earning board, 1; to temporary place, 1; to board, 1; to witness 
at court, 4; for court trial, 1; for a visit home, 3; from a visit 
to the school, 51; ran away from Industrial School, 5; trans- 
ferred to a hospital, 29; transferred to Reformatory for Women, 
3; committed to hospital for insane, 2; committed to school for 
feeble-minded, 1; became of age at the school, 3. 

The decrease of 35 in the number of commitments during the 
year has resulted in more comfortable conditions in housing 
and better opportunity for more effective treatment of the girls. 

The new central school building was occupied in January, 
and has proved its value by standardizing methods of education 
and improving discipline. The academic and industrial class- 
rooms are now in one building, and are more readily and easily 
supervised by the superintendent, who can be in instant touch 
with all the activities. The assembly hall and gymnasium 
have given opportunity for training in music, calisthenics and 
wholesome play, which have proved of great advantage. The 
development of team work made possible by these means is 
also an important factor in training the girls, whose lapses 
have been due often to an exaggerated individualism. A first- 
year high school commercial class has been inaugurated for 
girls who have finished the grammar grades. 

The inmates live in cottage groups and learn to perfect 
themselves in the household arts under the leadership of 
matrons and oflBcers who, by their sympathy and devotion, 
gain the affection of their charges. The girls learn to design, 
cut out and finish their own clothes, and to prepare wholesome 
meals in attractive and economical ways. They are encouraged 
to decorate their rooms and to arrange their belongings taste- 
fully, and generally to fit themselves to become competent 
homekeepers in anticipation of their return to the outer world. 
All these processes are conducted in a spirit such that the aver- 
age girls finds herself, perhaps for the first time, performing her 
obvious duties with a sense of pleasure hitherto unknov\-n, and 
unconsciously developing her character on wholesome lines. 

Outdoor play is an important part of the scheme of regener- 
ation, and generous provision is made for sports in which teams 
from the various cottages compete, culminating in competitive 
meets which arouse the enthusiasm of the entire school. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 53 

Every month one cottage gives an entertainment for the 
whole school, and the honor-grade girls have an additional 
monthly entertainment. In addition, each holiday is observed 
by an appropriate celebration. 

The girls are also encouraged by frequent visits from parents 
and friends, a large number of whom came to the school during 
the year. There were in addition many visitors who came to 
inspect and study the school, among whom it is gratifying to 
note were several judges who obtained more intimate knowl- 
edge of the school to which they might be required to commit 
girls. It would be of much benefit if this practice were more 
general. 

It is pleasant to record here that there is a growing tendency 
on the part of former members of the school to visit and report 
their welfare, and often to seek advice in their problems. 

Each Sunday and religious holiday Mass is celebrated and 
the Catholic children are instructed. Confessions are heard 
monthly. Protestant services are held each Sunday, and reli- 
gious instruction is given under the supervision of the clergy- 
man. An Episcopal clergyman gives instructions weekly and 
administers communion monthly; Jewish services are held every 
week. 

Many minor improvements have been made to make the 
cottages more sanitary and attractive. The old schoolrooms 
in the cottages have been converted into pleasant, home-like 
living rooms, largely by the efforts of the girls themselves. 

The chapel has been repainted and made more useful by 
enlarging the platform, and the grounds improved by reseeding 
some of the lawns and planting vines and shrubs and by addi- 
tional surface drainage. 

Fire escapes were added to three of the cottages; fire drills 
were held in each cottage and in the school building monthly, 
and the fire apparatus tested at short intervals. A high-pressure 
water system for additional protection is under construction. 

With an appropriation of $82,500, a total of $82,499.53 was 
expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, 836,904.05 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $45,595.48. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 



54 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

maintenance, S5.608. Total receipts from all sources other than 
the State treasury, 8199.15. Xet cost of maintenance to the 
Commonwealth, 882,300.38. Ratio of daily average number 
of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 
3.9. The trustees estimate that 8S3,2S3 will be necessary for 
maintenance in 1916. (See table, page 25.) For detailed 
analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 120-138. 

The trustees ask this year for special appropriations to cover 
three minor improvements, as follows: — 

1. For sidewalks S500 00 

2. For remo\ing steam boiler from chapel and installing the 

same with radiation in administration building . . 350 00 

3. For extension of piggery building by the addition of a wing 700 00 



81,550 00 



The State Board of Charity approves all these estimates as 
necessary to the plant. 

Massachusetts Hospital School. 
JoHX E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 8352,541.50. 
Normal capacity of plant, 300. Value per unit of capacity, 
81,175.14. 

Provides care and schooling for crippled and deformed chil- 
dren. 

In addition to the 315 cases under care during the year there 
were 15 children away from the school on a trial discharge who 
failed to return. They were, therefore, formally discharged 
without affecting the daily average. They were not under 
treatment. 

This total is 5 more than in 1914, and 20 more than in 1913. 

On December 1, 1914, there were 258 children in the school. 
Seventy-two cases were admitted and 60 discharged during the 
year. The maximum number at any one time was 279, the 
minimum, 193, and the daily average, 262.18, — an increase of 
12.25 over the preceding year. The average age of those dis- 
charged was thirteen years and three months. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 55 

Of the 270 children under treatment at the close of the year 
91 were using crutches, 49 of whom were wearing traction 
abduction splints for hip-joint affections; 15 were confined to 
wheel beds or chairs; 31 had plaster jackets or braces; 23 wore 
caliper splints on both legs, while 25 had one caliper splint 
each; 9 were wearing knee splints; and there were 17 infirmary 
patients, of whom 10 were upon bed frames. 

Twenty children, after an average stay of three years and 
six months, left to continue their education in the public or 
private schools, their average age being eleven years and eight 
months. Six boys proved capable of self-support, having been 
trained as follows: one as a licensed fireman; one became pro- 
ficient in the operation of steam laundry machinery; one found 
employment as a clerk in a store; one as an assistant to a job 
printer; one secured employment as a gardener's assistant; 
and one, a legless boy without friends to assist him in finding 
employment, is acting as telephone operator at the school 
until a better opportunity can be found. Four were discharged 
capable of partial support; 4 were mentally deficient and 7 were 
removed by parents who felt they were sufficiently improved 
to continue their studies at home. Seven were discharged at 
the end of the year because they had not returned from visits. 
Four were discharged because of inability to make suitable 
arrangements with parents. Two left on account of home- 
sickness, of whom one later asked to be allowed to return. 
Two were taken out of the Commonwealth by parents. One 
was transferred to another institution and 3 died. 

Fourteen of those discharged had gained the school diploma, 
of whom 9 have entered high school, electrical schools and 
business colleges. 

This school was established by statute in 1904 and opened 
December 1, 1907. The first child was received in January, 
1908. An appropriation of S300,0C0 was made and was ex- 
pended from time to time as experience developed necessity, 
the final expenditure being made during this year. The trus- 
tees have exercised the greatest care in the development of the 
school, with the result that provision for 300 pupils, as con- 
templated in the statute, has been furnished within the appro- 
priation. 



56 STATE BOARD OF CHAEITY. [P. D. 17. 

The purpose back of the founding of the school is to furnish 
education to children of school age who are prevented by 
physical disability from receiving an education in the public 
schools. The policy has been broadly educational, so that 
vocational training has developed with the growth of the school 
and in recognition of the social needs of the children. The 
outgrowth of this policy has resulted in so arranging activities 
that boys and girls have been able, upon discharge, to become 
self-supporting in whole or in part. 

Girls are given a systematic and practical course in sewing 
so that they are able to cut out and finish their own dresses. 
The girls gave a practical demonstration of the value of this 
training in planning and making their graduation dresses. 
One girl, who is so crippled as to be unable to go about except 
in a wheel chair, has become so expert with her needle that 
she is assured a good income. 

The domestic science cottage houses a group of girls who are 
taught and practice daily all the household arts, and who 
become proficient enough to take charge of a home, as has been 
demonstrated by many examples. The new girls' cottage, the 
latest to be erected, adjoins the domestic science cottage, and 
will be operated in conjunction with it, widening the scope of 
this department and extending its opportunities to a largely 
increased number. 

The boys' opportunities are somewhat wider, as is to be 
expected. Every department of the school has its pupil assist- 
ants, — a practice, which constitutes each employee in a meas- 
ure an instructor in his specialty. According to their physical 
ability the boys learn tailoring, carpentering, cobbling, making 
of splints and other appliances of like nature, firing, paint- 
ing, printing, steam laundering, concrete work, electrical work, 
dairying and general farming. They also learn to operate 
motors, and in some instances have qualified as licensed chauf- 
feurs. The band furnishes opportunities to master musical 
instruments, thus enabling some to supplement their income 
when discharged. 

The cultural branches outside of the classrooms are fostered 
through the active use of the library and by frequent concerts, 
plays and motion-picture performances. The boys' band and 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 57 

the girls' mandolin and guitar club add to the entertainment, 
and stimulate endeavors in two large groups who find pleasure 
and education in these pursuits. 

Because of their infirmities these children can be kept in 
school for comparatively short daily periods only, but as the 
classes are small the teachers are enabled to devote themselves 
more closely to the individual. The result is that many pupils 
find themselves on a par with their contemporaries in the public 
schools. 

Frequent visits are made by parents and friends, with benefit 
to the children, and visits on the part of the children to their 
relatives or connections are freely permitted. Although this 
involves some risk of introducing sickness to the school, the 
advantages are believed to outweigh the risk. 

Due to the complete system of ventilation which provides 
a constant flow of pure air in the buildings throughout the 
twenty-four hours, the freedom of the children from ordinary 
diseases, especially of the respiratory organs, is so complete as to 
cause wonder to the visitor. The careful system of segregation 
and constant watchfulness on the part of the medical staff 
contribute in a large measure to the detection and restraint of 
infectious and contagious diseases. 

Out of an appropriation of $82,282, a total of $80,065.48 was 
expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $34,555.27 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $45,510.21. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, $5,840. Total receipts from all sources 
other than the State treasury, $45,255.92. Net cost of main- 
tenance to the Commonwealth, $34,809.56. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number 
of inmates, 1 to 3.6. The trustees estimate the sum of $85,527 
for maintenance in 1916. (See table, page 25.) For detailed 
analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 120-138. 

The trustees request the following special appropriations for 
the coming year: — 



58 STATE BO.\RD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



1. 


Extension of administration building . 


. . S26.000 00 


2. 


Granolithic walks 


1.000 00 


3. 


Automobile truck and garage 


5,000 00 


4. 


Refrigeration room and ice house 


. . 1.500 00 


0. 


Piggerj' and slaughterhouse .... 


2.000 00 


6. 


Poultry houses 


. . 1,000 00 


t . 


Scales for weighing coal and farm produce 


750 00 


8. 


Extension of 6-inch water pipe line for four addil 


tional hy- 




drants 


900 00 


9. 


Additional land 


. . 10,000 00 




848,150 00 



The State Board of Charity approves the foregoing estimates. 
The item for land would provide for the acquisition of an ad- 
joining tract necessary to the development of this plant. The 
opportunity now exists to take it over at a reasonable price. 
Should title have to be taken later by eminent domain it is 
not likely that the net cost to the State would be less than 
this estimate. The extension of the administration building 
would provide much needed quarters for superintendent and 
other officers, would extend the administrative office quarters, 
now greatly overcrowded, and would make provision for fire- 
proof deposit of records, as required by statute. 

THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIA. 

The Board's supervision of tuberculosis hospitals covers the 
Rutland, Lakeville, North Reading and Westfield State sana- 
toria, and the tuberculosis wards at the State Infirmary. The 
four separate institutions are administered by one Board, the 
Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

During the year these four institutions treated 2,676 cases, 
with a combined normal capacity of about 1,000 patients, and 
a daily average population of 1,063.16. 

Of the total number cared for, 1,047 were in residence at the 
beginning of the year. The 1,629 admissions during the year 
were offset by the 1,596 discharges, leaving 1,080 on November 
30, 1915. 

Of the 1,629 cases admitted, 294 were classed as incipient; 
605 as moderately advanced; 702 as advanced; 12 as non- 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 59 

tubercular; and 16 as undetermined. Eight hundred ninety- 
two were males; 737 females. 

The discharges were classified as follows: disease arrested, 
240; condition improved, 538; condition not improved, 206; 
non-tubercular, 19; died, 242; unclassified because of shortness 
of stay, 83. Added to this classification. North Reading reports 
19 discharged w4th disease apparently arrested; 43 with disease 
progressive; and 49 quiescent. Lakeville reports 12 quiescent, 
while Westfield reports 98 with disease apparently arrested and 
47 quiescent. Thus 895, or 56 per cent, of all the discharged 
cases that were classified were sent away either with the disease 
apparently arrested or with condition improved. The corre- 
sponding percentage for last year was 53.4. 

Each year since the opening of the three new sanatoria the 
average length of stay of patients in the four institutions has 
been increasing. In 1912 it was 186.25 days; in 1913 it was 
218.5; in 1914 it was 223.25; in 1915 it was 244.25. To be 
mentioned at the same time with this lengthening of the insti- 
tution period of care is the follow^-up work which the trustees 
have been developing through a follow-up nurse. 

At the beginning of State sanatorium treatment of tubercu- 
losis cases it was foreseen that some private burdens would 
be unloaded upon the public, and that a constant tendency 
would set in against the private support of sanatorium 
patients, even of those able to pay. This tendency has not 
failed to make its appearance. The following tabulation shows 
the total patients under State sanatorium care in the years 
from 1900 to 1915, inclusive, together with the total cost of 
maintenance, the total amount received from patients for board, 
and the percentage which this board money bears in each year 
to the total maintenance. 



60 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITl' 



[P. D. 17. 



Decline in Receipts from Tuberculosis Patients for Board in State Sanatoria. 



Year 



Total 
Number of 
Patients in 

d^.r;?e |Expeod„ure 
\ear i 



Total 
! Maintenance 



Paid by 
Patients 



Percentage 



1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 (14 months) 

1907 



1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 



$92,361 64 I 
82,501 97 
95,244 86 

121,394 18 

131.212 42 
146,993 14 

201.213 65 
183.648 20 
180,242 23 
206,706 09 
410,066 95 
418,291 07 
439,068 79 
454,631 01 
522,432 46 
521,674 59 



$26,293 89 
27,414 81 
28,025 67 
37,411 32 
41,774 65 
46,130 78 
55,886 82 
44,526 55 
41,643 48 
43,740 89 
59,054 85 
45,416 45 
32,6S1 11 
26,052 66 
22,247 60 
43,637 07 



28.46 

33.22 

29.42 

30.81 

31.83 

31.38 

27.77 

24.24 

23.10 

21.16 

14.40 

10.85 

7.44 

5.73 

4.25 

8.36 



Some of the causes which have brought about this decline 
are to be found in the series of steps by which sick aid for 
tuberculosis cases was taken out of the designation of pauper 
aid. On August 1, 1907, tuberculosis was declared by the State 
Board of Health to be a disease dangerous to the public health. 
This operated to free the patient from the designation of pau- 
per. On April 16, 1910, the publication in city and town re- 
ports of the names of persons ^ecei^^.ng public aid was forbidden 
by statute. 

Another important cause of the tendency is found in the 
increasing numbers of advanced cases admitted to the State 
institutions. An advanced case is usually a patient who has 
been long out of work or prevented from earning, and who 
has spent all his means in previous treatment. In 1910 the 
percentage of incipient cases in the whole group admitted to 
the State sanatoria was 17.6 per cent; in 1915 it was 10 per 
cent. The presence of advanced cases in greater proportion 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 61 

than formerly, when added to the policy of the trustees of 
lengthening the stay of each patient, has materially prolonged 
the period of care for many non-paying cases. 

But over and above all these facts and excuses it is now 
common knowledge that the candidate for a bed in a State 
sanatorium is sure to be advised by friends, relatives or other 
patients, upon his arrival, that all he need do is keep quiet and 
he will not have to pay his board bill. This condition is not 
to be tolerated if the public funds are to be safeguarded, espe- 
cially in view of the probable fact that a greater insistence 
upon payment will not greatly lessen the willingness of the 
public to co-operate in fighting the disease. The State Board 
of Charity believes that the trustees have not been urging 
private payments as energetically as they should, and it there- 
fore recommends that they employ an agent, under the author- 
ity conferred upon them by Acts of 1907, chapter 474, section 
10, as amended by Acts of 1912, chapter 17, whose duty it 
shall be to investigate the ability of patients to pay their board 
bills and to prepare claims in proper cases for prosecution by 
the Attorney-General. 

Separate report is not made upon the tuberculosis department 
of the State Infirmary. It is considered under the general 
heading of the State Infirmary, at page 30, ante. The four sep- 
arate sanatoria follow : — 

Rutland State Sanatorium, Rutland. 
Elliott Washburn, M.D., Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $574,298.10. 
Normal capacity of plant, 354. Value per unit of capacity, 
$1,622.31. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with pulmonary tuberculosis. 

During the year 887 patients have been under care. This 
total is 62 more than in 1914, and 93 more than in 1913. Of 
the whole number, 349 were in residence at the beginning of 
the year. The remaining 538 were admitted under the follow- 
ing classification, based upon the ascertained progress of the 
disease: incipient, 207, or 38.47 per cent; moderately advanced, 



62 STATE BO.\RD OF CH.\RITY. [P. D. 17. 

250, or 46.46 per cent; far advanced, 66, or 12.27 per cent; 
found to be non-tubercular, 8, or 1.41 per cent, and 7 not 
classified, or 1.31 per cent. Of the new cases, males numbered 
286; females, 252. Number of patients at the close of the year, 
352. 

The discharges numbered 535, namely, 269 males and 266 
females, classified according to conditions, as follows: disease 
arrested, 208, or 38.8 per cent; improved, 177, or 33 per cent; 
not improved, 87, or 16.2 per cent; non-tubercular, 9; died, 
32, or 6 per cent; unclassified because of shortness of stay, 22, 
or 4.1 per cent. Daily average number of bed patients, ICO, 
or 28.65 per cent. 

The average daily census was 349. The largest daily census 
was 355; the smallest, 340. The average for 1914 was 350. 
Average duration of stay of patients, ten months and one day. 
The corresponding average for 1914 was ten months and six 
days. 

The large number of admissions and discharges is due to the 
establishment by the trustees of two important rules, viz.: one 
which limits the residence of patients at Rutland to two years, 
the other placing all new patients on a month's trial basis. 
These rules increased the number of discharges by transfer to 
other State sanatoria, to municipal tuberculosis hospitals and 
to their homes. 

With an appropriation of $193,000, a total of $192,930.84 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $70,946 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $121,984.84. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, $10,458. Total receipts from all sources 
other than the State treasury, $107,577.92. Xet cost of main- 
tenance to the Commonwealth, $85,352.92. Ratio of daily aver- 
age number of persons employed to daily average number of 
inmates, 1 to 1.67. The trustees estimate the sum of $192,500 
for maintenance in 1916. (See table, page 25.) For detailed 
analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 120-138. 

The working capacity of this institution has been increased 
somewhat by a rearrangement of ward space, which takes from 
the quarters for women and adds correspondingly to the facili- 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 63 

ties for men. As the demand for space for men is much 
greater than for women, this change brings the institution 
plant into more complete accord with the requirements of the 
public. 

The greatest usefulness of the sanatorium is also served by 
two new rules, the first limiting the period of residence to two 
years, and the second admitting all cases on thirty days' trial. 
By the first regulation the permanent support of chronic cases, 
not contemplated in this enterprise, is avoided. By the second, 
the care of incipient and early cases, for which this institution 
was always intended, can be guaranteed through the expedient 
of transfer or discharge for all patients not found eligible under 
the classification. 

During the year improvements have been made in the way 
of fire escapes for the upper infirmary and for the second floor 
of the nurses' home; also a large amount of painting and gen- 
eral repairs. 

The trustees submit the following estimates for the coming 
year, with a request for special appropriations covering the 
same : — 

1. New coal trestle, including small piece of land and right of 

way over private road $7,500 00 

2. Tractor engine for farm, including equipment . . . 2,500 00 

3. Greenhouses 1,500 00 

4. Fireproof vault . . * 2,000 00 

5. Improvement of lands (prison labor) 10,000 00 



$23,500 00 



During the summer the sum of $5,000 was set aside from 
contingent funds for the development of land by prison labor 
at this sanatorium. The plan was to apply the labor of certain 
prisoners from the Massachusetts Reformatory to the develop- 
ment of waste land belonging to the institution. A portable 
camp was constructed at the reformatory at an expense of 
SI, 000 and set up at Rutland. The first task was the ditching 
of a tract of bottom land. This work was carried on until cold 
weather, when operations were transferred to the clearing of a 
small piece of upland. The work accomplished entailed a cost 



64 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

in excess of and out of proportion to its value, if the sanato- 
rium interests alone be considered. The great apparent benefit 
to the men, though not related to the sanatorium enterprise, 
is, however, not to be left out of account. 

The trustees now ask for ^25,000 as a special appropriation 
to cover the development of sanatorium lands at the four in- 
stitutions, namely, $10,000 for Rutland, and $5,000 each for 
the three other hospitals. The State Board of Charity believes 
this enterprise to be still in the experimental stage, the proba- 
bility being that it is not a financial success if the benefit to 
the prisoner be left out of account. On the other hand, if it 
is to be undertaken for the benefit that will accrue to the 
prisoners it should be carried on by the Prison Commissioners, 
who have charge of the prisoners, rather than by the Trustees 
of Hospitals for Consumptives, w^hose duties are confined to 
the treatment, of tuberculosis. 

As a result of this view this Board has approved the request 
for Rutland to the extent of $5,000, the purpose being to com- 
plete the experiment, but has disapproved the undertaking for 
the three other sanatoria until the Rutland experiment shall 
have been worked out. 

All other requests for special improvements for this sanato- 
rium are approved by this Board. The most important of 
these is the coal trestle. The great difficulty and expense of 
hauling in the winter time over the Muschopauge road. If 
miles, has been submitted to heretofore because the State pos- 
sessed a trestle at Muschopauge which must be discarded if a 
new trestle were to be located. This trestle has now become 
too old and too unsafe for further use. This past year $250 
was laid out in order to bring it to a condition such that the 
railroad company would agree to run cars upon it, and this 
process of piecing will have to go on each year until the struc- 
ture is practically replaced by a patchwork trestle of new lum- 
ber. The economical plan is to discard this worn-out structure 
and to build another at a new location, so that the haul can 
be made on a hard-surfaced road. An economical addition to 
this improvement would be the farm tractor, which would do 
all the hauling at a saving each year of an amount only slightly 
less than the first cost of the machine. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 65 

North Reading State Sanatorium, North Reading. 
Carl C. MacCorisox, ISI.D., Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $221,821. Nor- 
mal capacity of plant, 194. Value per unit of capacity, 
$1,143.41. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with pulmonary tuberculosis. 

During the year 505 patients have been under care. Of this 
number, 199 were in residence at the beginning of the year. 
The remaining 306 were admitted under the following classi- 
fication, based upon the ascertained progress of the disease: 
incipient, 3, or .98 per cent; moderately advanced, 70, or 22.87 
per cent; advanced, 229, or 74.83 per cent; 2, or .65 per cent, 
not tubercular; and 2, or .65 per cent, not determined. Sex of 
patients admitted: males, 167; females, 139. There has been a 
daily average of 82.7 bed cases, — approximately 42 per cent 
of the daily population. 

The discharges numbered 305, namely, 166 males and 139 
females, classified according to condition, as follows: disease 
arrested, 4, or 1.31 per cent; apparently arrested, 19, or 6.22 
per cent; improved, 89, or 29.18 per cent; quiescent, 49, or 
16.06 per cent; 43, or 14.09 per cent, were progressive; non- 
tubercular, 5, or 1.63 per cent; died, 65, or 21.31 per cent; 
unclassified because of shortness of stay, 31, or 10.16 per cent. 
Of the patients discharged, the average duration of residence 
in the sanatorium was one hundred ninety days, as opposed to 
one hundred seventy-six days for the preceding year. Number 
of patients at the end of the year, 200. 

The largest daily census was 202, the smallest, 192; aver- 
age, 198.33. The average for 1914 was 194.53, and for 1913, 
178.56. 

Thirty-nine cases have been supported from private funds; 
260 cases by cities and towns; 124 cases entirely by the State; 
and 16 private cases have later become either town or State 
charges. 

Of the 65 deaths the past year 9 were cases who died within 
thirty days of the time they w^ere admitted. Thirty-six, or 
55.4 per cent, were patients who had resided here less than five 



66 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

months, — patients who came here as a very last resort, having 
tried elsewhere for months or years some other mode of treat- 
ment. 

Out of an appropriation of S90,871.50 a total of $90,666.48 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $37,903.41 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $52,763.07. Weekly per capita cost of main- 
tenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $8,693. Total receipts from all sources other than 
the State treasury, $50,519.12. Net cost of maintenance to 
the Commonwealth, $40,147.36. Ratio of daily average number 
of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 
2.5. For detailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see 
pages 120-138. The trustees estimate the sum of $91,750 
maintenance in 1916. (See table, page 25.) 

Additions have been made to the concrete walks about the 
administration building; cement floor laid in laboratory; ex- 
tensive repairs to verandas of wards and pavilions, and a large 
cement cistern has been built at the power house for the col- 
lection of waste water from the boilers and heating plant. A 
pair of Fairbanks' wagon scales have been installed near the 
coal shed; a concrete retaining wall built, and 6,519 feet of 
cement flooring, on which coal is stored, have been laid at the 
side track. 

Work on new summer camps was completed about the middle 
of August, 1915. 

The trustees request special appropriations to cover the fol- 
lowing recommendations : — 

1. ^ledical building ....... 

2. Storehouse and root cellar ..... 

3. Fire proofing and enlarging power plant, and addition 

of one extra boiler and refrigerating machine . 

4. Improvement of lands (prison labor) .... 



With regard to the first of these requests it is to be said that 
the present high percentage of bed cases should not and prob- 
ablv cannot be maintained in the admissions to this institution 



$4,665 00 
2,000 00 


26,880 00 
5,000 00 


$38,.545 00 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 67 

unless facilities for care are increased on the hospital side. The 
plant is overcrowded, and the arrangements for the care and 
treatment of hemorrhage and terminal cases are so inadequate 
that many such patients must be cared for under conditions 
not favorable to their welfare. Expansion of the institution 
thus far has been in the extension of its pavilions, — a needed 
addition. It is now well-nigh imperative that hospital facilities 
be increased or that, in the alternative, admissions be reduced 
in the face of a long waiting list. 

The third item raises a serious question of the duty of the 
State to helpless sick persons under its care. The sanatorium 
is constructed of wood, the only material available under the 
meager appropriation first granted. The power house, all of 
wood, stands within a stone's throw of almost all the beds in 
the institution. It is reasonably certain that a fire making 
much headway in the power plant would sweep through the 
entire group of buildings before the patients could be taken 
out. The trustees and this Board believe that this fire risk 
is too great to be continued. The Board therefore approves 
the estimate for fireproofing. The estimate for storehouse and 
root cellar is approved as a wise addition to the facilities. The 
estimate for prison labor is disapproved for the reasons stated 
at page 63 in discussion of the Rutland experiment. 

Lakeville State Sanatorium, Lakeville. 
Sumner Coolidge, M.D., Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $257,207.20. 
Normal capacity of plant, 246. Value per unit of capacity, 
$1,045.56. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with pulmonary tuberculosis. During the year 702 cases have 
been under care. This total number of cases is 69 more than 
in 1914, and 153 more than in 1913. Of the whole number, 
245 were in residence at the beginning of the year. The remain- 
ing 457 cases were admitted under the following classification, 
based upon the ascertained progress of the disease: incipient, 2, 
or less than 1 per cent; moderately advanced, 198, or 43 per 
cent; advanced, 249, or 55 per cent; not considered, 7, or less 



68 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

than 2 per cent; and 1 not tubercular, less than 1 per cent. 
Males numbered 282; females, 175. 

The discharged cases numbered 442, namely, 264 males and 
178 females, classified according to condition, as follows: disease 
arrested, 10, or 5 per cent; improved, 237, or 49 per cent; quies- 
cent, 12, or 5 per cent; not improved, 77, or 16 per cent; died, 
92, or 4 per cent gain over 1914; unclassified because of short- 
ness of stay, 11, or 2.4 per cent. Two hundred sixty remained 
on November 30. 

Daily average number of patients was 257.02. The largest 
daily number was 270, the smallest, 230. The average for 1914 
was 245. Average duration of stay of the 442 discharged 
patients, one hundred seventy-six and nine-tenths days. The 
corresponding average for 1914 was one hundred sixty-four 
and one-half days. 

Of the total number of cases cared for during the year 34, 
or 6 per cent, were supported from private funds; 354, or 50 
per cent, were supported from municipalities; 227, or 32 per 
cent, were supported by the Commonwealth; 79, or 11 per 
cent, were cases whose settlements were unknown. 

With an appropriation of $114,788.81, a total of $114,787.76 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $46,040.96 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $68,746.80. Weekly per capita cost of main- 
tenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from main- 
tenance, $8,458. Total receipts from all sources other than the 
State treasury, $76,984.69. Net cost of maintenance to the 
Commonwealth, $37,803.07. Ratio of daily average number of 
persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 3.1. 
The trustees estimate the sum of $121,264 for maintenance in 
1916. (See table, page 25.) For detailed analysis of receipts 
and expenditures, see pages 120-138. 

The most important improvement made during the year has 
been the addition of 8 beds to the north shack. Other additions 
have been made to the farm group, and some important ad- 
vance has been effected in the development of institution 
grounds. 

The trustees request the following special appropriations : — 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 69 



Land and equipment for dairy : — 






1. Land: — 






60 acres, with two-tenement house and 






2 barns (Bunton) .... 


$5,000 00 




36 acres (Pushee) 


3,300 00 




2. Sixty cows 


6,000 00 




3. Cow barn, 68 stalls, milk room and silos . 


6,000 00 




4. Repairing old buildings .... 


1,300 00 


S21,600 00 



Coal trestle $3,500 00 

Land for same . 1,500 00 

5,000 00 

Xew pavilion, 20 patients 2,000 00 

Improvement of lands (prison labor) 5,000 00 



$33,600 00 



For years the trustees have sought an independent milk sup- 
ply for this sanatorium. Its necessity need scarcely be argued at 
length. Independence in heat, light and power, in milk, and in 
water supply is a fundamental in efficient State institution 
administration. In the matter of milk for persons who are ill 
in bed, the necessity for a degree of control which can guar- 
antee quality and sufficiency of the supply is obvious. The 
purchased supply for Lakeville is insufficient. Its quality is 
often low. Good land for dairy purposes lies at the door of 
the institution, and is now available. Economy as well as a 
wise State's policy in the conduct of institutions dictate the 
development of the independent supply. A part of the land 
asked for under this estimate is sought for the additional reason 
that land for sewage disposal is becoming a necessity. The 
land can be bought now. In a few years it must be taken by 
eminent domain if no longer in the market, and the cost is 
likely to be much higher. 

The coal trestle is a question of saving money. Coal should 
be purchased in the spring for a full year's supply. This advan- 
tage of the market cannot be availed of in the absence of a 
place for storage of coal and a trestle which will guarantee 
unloading rapidly enough to avoid demurrage. If this estimate 
had been granted last year as requested, the saving on the 



70 STATE BOARD OF CRARITi'. [P. D. 17. 

purchase of this year's supply would have approximated the 
entire cost of the improvement. Though the extraordinary 
jump in coal prices during 1915 is not usual, an adequate coal 
trestle may always be counted upon to save its first cost within 
a comparatively short time. 

The new pavilion is an expedient for replacing tents with 
more permanent camps to care for ambulator^' cases. The 
item for prison labor is disapproved, pending the result of the 
Rutland experiment. 

Westfield State Saxatoriiivi, Westfield. 
Hexry D. Chad wick, M.D.. Su-periiitendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $225,101.07. 
Normal capacity of plant, 229. Value per unit of c^pacitj', 
$982.97. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with pulmonarA' tuberculosis. 

During the year 582 cases have been under care. This total 
is 120 more than in 1914, and 139 more than in 1913. Of the 
whole number, 254 were in residence at the beginning of the 
year. The remaining 328 cases were admitted under the fol- 
lowing classification, based upon the ascertained progress of 
the disease: incipient, 82, or 25 per c-ent, aU but 12 of these 
were children ; moderately advanced, 87, or 26 per cent, of these, 
48 were children; advanced, 158, or 49 i>er cent, only 21 were 
children; found to be non-tubercular, 1. Of the new cases, 
males numbered 157; females, 171. A daily average of 63.5 
were bed patients, of whom 12 per cent were children. 

The discharged cases numbered 314, namely, 153 males and 
161 females, classified according to condition, as follows: dis- 
ease arrested, 18, or 5.7 per cent; apparently arrested, 98, or 
31.2 per cent; quiescent, 47, or 14.9 per cent; improved, 35, 
or 11.1 per cent; not improved, 42, or 13.3 per cent: non-tuber- 
cular, 2; died, 53, or 16.8 per cent; unclassified because of 
shortness of stay, 19, or 6.05 per cent. 

The daily average number of patients was 258.81. The 
largest daily number was 268; the smallest, 245. The average 
for 1914 was 234.35. Average duration of stay of patients, 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 71 

three hundred six days, — a marked increase. The correspond- 
ing average for 1914 was two hundred forty-seven days. 

Of the 328 admissions, 27 paid their own board, 196 were 
supported by cities and towns, 88 were State charges, and the 
status of 17 has not yet been determined. 

Of the 538 admissions, 100, or 18.58 per cent, paid their own 
bills during their entire residence within the year; 38, or 7.06 
per cent, paid for varying periods and were unable to continue, 
thus throwing their bills upon their city or town in 17 of these 
instances; upon the State in 9 instances; and in 12 instances 
the settlement had not been determined. Four hundred, or 
74.36 per cent of the admissions, contributed nothing toward 
their own support, and were paid for by the city or town of 
legal settlement in 194 instances, by the State in 91 instances, 
and 115 were cases whose settlement was not determined. 

With an appropriation of $123,290, a total of $123,289.51 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $50,444.13 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $72,845.38. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, $9,017. Total receipts from all sources other 
than the State treasury, $64,605.14. Net cost of maintenance 
to the Commonwealth, $58,684.37. Ratio of daily- average 
number of persons employed to daily average number of in- 
mates,' 1 to 2.6. The trustees estimate the sum of $124,000 for 
maintenance in 1916. (See table, page 25.) For detailed analysis 
of receipts and expenditures, see pages 120-138. 

The policy instituted by the trustees of developing this in- 
stitution especially for the care and treatment of children of 
school age has resulted in the corresponding growth of an 
institutional school. It had a meager beginning when in 1912 
there were 12 pupils holding their sessions in a recreation 
room off the main dining hall. In 1914 the attendance had 
reached 65; a new children's ward with a capacity of 70 beds 
had been opened, and the trustees were asking for a central 
school building. This structure, granted that year, was com- 
pleted and occupied during this year. School attendance rose 
to 140, showing the great pressure for the new facilities. The 
trustees now contemplate classes in craft work and domestic 



72 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

science for the older patients, these to be in addition to the 
usual grade studies. 

The farm, stable and grounds department has received a 
notable addition in the new greenhouse, given by a private 
citizen and transferred and set up on the institution tract dur- 
ing the year. 

Westfield has been more fortunate than Lakeville in securing 
a grant for a coal trestle. The structure was completed by the 
end of the year. This makes it possible to unload 1,000 tons 
at one time, which, in addition to the 300 tons' capacity of the 
pockets at the power house, gives the institution much needed 
leeway in bargaining for its coal supply. 

A new 150 horse power boiler has been installed as an abso- 
lute necessity with the new^ school building and greenhouse 
now in use. 

The trustees request the following special appropriations for 
the coming year : — 

1. Storage and horse barn, stable for j^oung stock and dairy 

room 

2. Barn and dairy equipment . 

3. Garage, carpenter shop and root cellar 

4. Fireproof vault 

5. Improvement of lands (prison labor) . 



Items 1 and 2 represent a much-needed replacement and ex- 
tension of the farm buildings. Their appropriateness is recog- 
nized by the Board, but in the estimates the trustees contem- 
plate locating the buildings on the present site of the barn 
and cow monitor. This the Board believes to be unwise, as 
the present site is the very front yard of the institution, and 
not sufficiently removed to guarantee immunity from a fly 
nuisance and from noxious odors in the summer months. The 
Board therefore disapproves the requests, pending further study 
of location. 

The third item is a highly advisable improvement. It is 
approved by the Board. The item for prison labor is dis- 
approved as inadvisable, pending the results of the Rutland 
experiment. (See page 63.) 



S6,500 00 


1,784 48 


5,000 00 


1,500 00 


5,000 00 


$19,784 48 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 73 

PENIKESE HOSPITAL, PENIKESE ISLAND. 
Frank H. Parker, M.D., Superintendent. 

This institution is adniinstered directly by the Board. Total 
valuation of plant, $110,829.47. Normal capacity, 19. Value 
per unit of capacity, $5,833.13. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with leprosy. 

During the year 14 patients have been under care. This 
total is 1 less than last year and 3 less than in 1913. Thirteen 
of the patients cared for were in residence at the beginning 
of the year. One w^as admitted and 3 have died during the 
year. 

Of the patients remaining in the hospital at the close of the 
year, 9 were suffering from the disease in the tubercular form, 
1 in the anaesthetic and 1 mixed. The average age of the pa- 
tients was 34. Four were married; 3 of the total were females. 
All were of foreign race and nationality. The races or places 
of origin represented are as follows: Italian, 1; Portuguese, 3; 
Chinese, 3; Russian, 3; Lettish, 1; Japanese, 1; Greek, 1; Brit- 
ish West Indies (Barbados), 1. 

Unevenness of rainfall brought about a water famine in June 
and July. The wells both gave out, and resort was had to the 
emergency reservoir which contained at that time about 8,000 
gallons. By the middle of July 5,000 gallons had been brought 
by boat from New Bedford. This combined supply, with the 
use limited to one hour in the morning and one hour in the 
evening, met the situation until the heavier rainfall of August 
set in. Contrary to conditions on the mainland, a compara- 
tively small amount of rain fell during July. 

An important improvement in the method of feeding w^as 
effected by the close of this year. Heretofore the patients 
have had their meals in their individual rooms or cottages, — 
a method possessing many advantages because of the condition 
of several of the inmates, but a system which is on the whole 
uneconomical, and for a larger group of consumers impossible. 
On Thanksgiving Day a general dining room arranged in the 
hospital building was opened for all the ambulatory cases. 
Thus far this plan works well. It is believed that the new ar- 



74 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

rangement will promote sociability as well as check waste, and 
ensure more regular and more wholesome food. 

With an appropriation of S27,950, a total of $28,949.98 was 
expended for the maintenance of this institution, creating a 
deficit of $999.98, which was due in part to the water famine, 
but in greater measure to emergency repairs on the heating sys- 
tem of the hospital building. Of the total expended for main- 
tenance, $12,837.18 was for salaries, wages and labor; all other 
expenses, $16,112.80, Ratio of daily average number of per- 
sons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 1.1. 
For detailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 
120-138. 

Because of the widespread public interest, not only in Massa- 
chusetts but throughout the nation, in leprosy, and the care of 
persons afflicted with it, the Board submits the following 
account of the care and treatment of lepers in this State: — 

State Care axd Treatment of Lepers ix Massachusetts. 

Leprosy has been known and reckoned within this Common- 
wealth for less than four decades, the first authentic record 
appearing in 1882. It seems reasonably certain that the disease 
is not endemic, since every case discovered thus far has shown 
a history indicating foreign origin. Indeed, in most instances 
the facts are such as to preclude local contraction. The disease 
as a problem for the community, therefore, is inseparably con- 
nected with immigration from those districts and territories 
where it is prevalent. 

A short chronological statement of each of the cases discov- 
ered from the beginning follows : ^ — 

Case 1. — Male. Age not ascertained.- Single. American. 
Gardener. Discovered December 11, 1882, at Salem. Tuber- 
cular form. Isolated at Salem almshouse. Died there March, 
1883. 

Case 2. — Name unknown. Female. Swedish. Discovered 
some time in 1889 at the quarantine station, Boston. Was taken 
from the bark "Samaria" at quarantine and deported without 
having landed. This was a fairly advanced case. 

1 For more detailed information, see tabulation at p. 110. 
- Ages are given as of the date of discovery. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 75 

Case 3. — Male. Age and civil status unknown. American. 
Mariner. Discovered September, 1895, at East Boston. Tuber- 
cular form. Isolated at Gallop's Island. Died there in 1897. 
This man came first to the attention of the Boston board of 
health. He had shipped for years with his father who was super- 
cargo on a ship which carried lepers from various islands of the 
Hawaiian group to Molokai. He had been in the United States 
a very short time before discovery. 

Case 4- — Name and sex unknown. Apprehended in Novem- 
ber, 1900, at Boston, and isolated at Gallop's Island. Died there. 

Case 5. — Male. Age and civil status unknown. Native of 
British West Indies (colored). Apprehended November 27, 1901, 
at Boston (West End). Anaesthetic form. Isolated at Gallop's 
Island. Escaped May 8, 1903. Not heard from. This case ap- 
plied at the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary 
to be treated for a sore eye. The case was there diagnosed as 
leprosy. 

Case 6. — Male. Aged 38. Stevedore and laborer. Married. 
Wife and eight children. Native of Cape Verde Islands. 
Discovered April 22, 1904, in Harwich, Mass. Tubercular form. 
Diagnosed by physician in Harwich. Case isolated at Harwich 
until November 16, 1905; then to Penikese. Died there Novem- 
ber 19, 1914. This was a well-advanced case at discovery. In 
the United States twelve years prior to discovery. 

Case 7. — Male. Aged 23. Married. Chinese. One son in 
China. Apprehended June 6, 1904, at Roxbury. First brought 
to the attention of the Boston board of health. Tubercular 
form. This case has been in the United States from two to three 
years prior to discovery. Stated that he was born in United 
States, but had been to China; returned from there in 1902. 
Now at Penikese. 

Case 8. — Male. Aged 34. Single. Sailor. Born at Brava, 
Cape Verde Islands. Discovered August 14, 1904, at Boston. 
First brought to the attention of the Boston board of health. 
Tubercular form. Isolated at Gallop's Island for one week, 
when he escaped. Apprehended again January 1, 1905, and 
isolated again at Gallop's. To Penikese November 16, 1905. 
Died there June 21, 1907. This man had shipped in and out of 
United States ports, especially Boston, for about fourteen years 
prior to discovery. 

Case 9. — Male. Aged 25. Single. Chinese. Discovered Jan- 
uary 18, 1905, at Newburyport. Laundryman. Tubercular 
form. Well-advanced case. Isolated at Gallop's Island and sent 
to Penikese November 16, 1905. This man had been in the 
United States about five years, four years of which he had spent 
in Newburyport where he ran a laundry. Now at Penikese. 



76 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Case 10. — Female. Aged 26. Married. Husband and three 
children. Fourth child, born at Penikese Hospital. Discovered 
April 22, 1905, in the town of Wareham. Native of Cape 
Verde Islands. Housewife. Tubercular form. Sent to Penikese 
November 20, 1905, and died there March 13, 1915. She had 
been in the United States about three and one-half years before 
discovery. Came directly to Cape Cod and had lived there ever 
since. 

Case 11. — Male. Aged 54. Married. Wife and two children. 
American. Born at New Orleans, La. Clerk and accountant. 
Discovered October 29, 1906, in Hyde Park. An advanced case, 
tubercular type. Isolated at Gallop's and sent to Penikese May 
31, 1907. This man had never been outside the limits of the 
United States, and had lived in Massachusetts for eighteen years 
preceding discovery. Prior to his coming to this State he had 
spent some years traveling in Tennessee, Arkansas and Texas. 
Was sorting and counting currency for an express company when 
apprehended. 

Case ;^. — Male. Aged 23. Single. Born at Trinidad, 
British West Indies. Clerk. Discovered February 1, 1907, at 
Somerville. Case diagnosed in Boston. Clerk. Disease of mixed 
form and well manifest. Isolated at Gallop's and sent to Peni- 
kese May 31, 1907. Patient had been in the United States less 
than three years, arriving November 18, 1904, at New York. He 
had lived in Montreal between that date and February, 1905. 
Died at Penikese Augtist 8, 1913. 

Case 13. — Female. Aged 27. Single. Father and mother 
and three sisters in Russia. One brother in Concord, Mass. 
Uncle in Cambridge. Lettish. Born in Russia. Domestic. 
Discovered July 22, 1907, Brookline. Diagnosed at Massachu- 
setts General Hospital. Disease of tubercular form well mani- 
fest. Sent to Penikese July 24, 1907, and now there. Came to 
the United States in 1900. Worked as a domestic in Concord, 
Mass., four and one-half years and with various families in' 
Brookline two and one-half years. 

Case 14. — Male. Aged 41. Married. Wife and five children. 
Born in Russia. Employee in leather factory in Lynn. Dis- 
covered August 27, 1907, in Boston, living at that time in East 
Boston. Sent to Penikese August 29, 1907. Died there October 
27, 1915. Patient came to the United States in 1903. Lived in 
Boston two months and in Lynn four years. Had just moved 
from Lynn when apprehended. 

Case 15. — Female. Aged 19. Single. Lettish. Born in 
Courland, Russia. Domestic. Discovered September 2, 1907, 
working as domestic in Brookline. Diagnosed at Massachusetts 
General Hospital. Tubercular form. Disease reasonably well 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 77 

manifest. Sent to Penikese December 3, 1907. Deported May 
10, 1908. This patient came to the United States in 1905 and 
had worked in Brookline as a domestic ever since. 

Case 16. — Male. Aged 64. Waiter. Hebrew. Two sons. 
Born in Russia. Teacher of Jewish language. Discovered March 
19, 1909, living in Boston. Diagnosed at Massachusetts General 
Hospital. Tubercular form. Well-advanced case. Taken to 
Penikese March 27, 1909, and now there. Patient landed in 
United States June 17, 1899, and has lived in Boston all of the 
time since. 

Case 17. — Male. xA.ged 17. Single. Mother only. Born at 
Bridgetown, Barbados, British West Indies. Student in high 
school. Discovered March 22, 1909, living in Upton, Mass., 
with his mother. Diagnosed at Massachusetts General Hospital. 
Disease of tubercular form. Manifest for three or four years. 
Sent to Penikese March 27, 1909, and died there February 17, 
1915. This patient came to the United States with his mother 
in February, 1902, and had lived in Upton all of the time since. 

Case 18. — Male. Aged 25. Single. Born in Greece. Cook. 
Discovered April 24, 1909, while an inmate of the State Infir- 
mary, Tewksbury. Tubercular form of disease. First diagnosed 
as impetigo contagiosa. Had been admitted to the Infirmary from 
Haverhill. Sent to Penikese April 24, 1909. Deported October 
15, 1909. Patient came to the United States March 8, 1907, 
and had lived in Haverhill all the time until apprehended. 

Case 19. — Female. Aged 44. Widow. One daughter. Born 
at Brava, Cape Verde Islands. Housewife. Discovered De- 
cember 16, 1909, in New Bedford. Diagnosed by superin- 
tendent of Penikese Hospital. A well-advanced case of the an- 
aesthetic type. Sent to Penikese December 19, 1909. This case 
came to the United States May 5, 1902, and had lived in New 
Bedford all the time since landing. Daughter said mother came 
to this country as cook. Now at Penikese. 

Case 20. — Male. Aged 23. Single. Born in Syria. Laborer. 
Discovered May 19, 1910, living in North Adams. A well- 
developed case of the tubercular type. This patient escaped from 
the local authorities and has never been apprehended. He did 
not come to the custody of State authorities. He came to the 
United States and New York in 1906, then to Keene, N. H., 
one year; Claremont, N. H., one year; Barre, Vt., one year; 
North Adams, one year. 

Case 21. — Male. Age 36. Single. Born in Japan. Car- 
penter and general laborer. Discovered January 17, 1911, living 
in Boston (South End). A well-developed case of the tubercular 
type. Taken to Penikese January 26, 1911, and now there. 
Patient came to the United States in 1908, landing at Seattle. 



78 STATE BOARD OF CHARITi'. [P. D. 17. 

Ca^e 22. — Female. Aged 47. Married. Husband. Born in 
Italy. Housewife. Discovered May 10, 1911, living in Boston 
(North End). Disease of the tubercular type manifest for some 
time. Sent to Penikese May 15, 1911, and now there. Patient 
came to the United States and New York September, 1907. 
Directly to Boston. 

Case 23. — Male. Aged bb. Married. Hebrew. Born in 
Russia. Painter. Discovered May 11, 1912, living in Boston. 
A well-developed case of the tubercular type. Sent to Penikese 
May 11, 1912. Discharged for treatment elsewhere March 21, 
1913. Patient came to the United States about 1892, and had 
lived in Boston all the time since arrival. 

Case 24. — Male. Aged 30. Married. Wife and son in China. 
Born in China, Discovered June 13, 1912, living in Boston. 
Diagnosed at Grace Hospital. Well-developed case of amesthetic 
and macular type. Sent ,to Penikese June 15, 1912, and now 
there. Patient claimed to have been born in San Francisco, but 
probably born in China. Came to the United States in 1902; in 
Providence, R. I., seven months; Boston, two days. Released 
to go to China January 3, 1914. 

Case 25. — Male. Aged 34. Single. Born in the Azores. 
Laborer. Discovered June 26, 1912, while working as a laborer 
at the New Bedford almshouse. Tubercular form. Disease 
manifest at the time of arrival in the United States. Sent to 
Penikese June 28, 1912. Deported August 13, 1912. Patient 
came to the United States November 25, 1910, landing in New 
York. Direct from there to New Bedford. Had been employed 
as laborer at New Bedford almshouse for two years prior to 
discovery. 

Case 26. — Male. Aged 24. Single. Born in Fogo Island, 
Cape Verde group. Laborer; cranberry picker. Discovered 
November 9, 1912, at Fairhaven. Residing at the time in East 
Norton. Diagnosed by superintendent of Penikese Hospital; 
well-advanced case of tubercular type. Taken to Penikese 
November 10, 1912, and now there. Patient came to the United 
States about four years ago, and had worked as a laborer in 
various towns on the cape during the interval. 

Case 27. — Male. Aged 38. Single. Born in China. Cook. 
Discovered March 7, 1913, at 42 Harrison Avenue, Boston. A 
well-developed case, tubercular in form. Taken to Penikese 
March 13, 1913, and now there. Patient came to the United 
States in 1905, landing in San Francisco. Had been in Boston 
one year. 

Case 28. — Male. Aged 26. Single. Two brothers and one 
uncle in Boston. Hebrew. Born in the Baltic Provinces, Russia. 
Brush maker. Tubercular form. Disease manifest for some 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 79 

time. Discovered November 7, 1913, in Boston, residing at the 
time in Maiden. Taken to Penikese November 12, 1913, and 
now there. Patient came to Massachusetts in 1906, living in 
Boston most of the time since arrival. Lived in Maiden three 
months. 

Case 29. — Male. Aged 27. Single. Born in Greece. Dish 
washer. Discovered November 8, 1915, in Boston. Diagnosed 
at Massachusetts General Hospital. Tubercular form with an- 
aesthetic areas. Disease well manifest. Sent to Penikese Novem- 
ber 18, 1915, and now there. Patient landed in New York 
about three and one-half years ago. 

Case 30. — Male. Aged 72. Married. Wife and one child. 
Storekeeper. Discovered December 9, 1915, in the town of 
Bourne. Diagnosed at Massachusetts General Hospital. Anaes- 
thetic form. Disease manifest for past ten years at least. To 
Penikese December 19, 1915. Patient was a sailor in his youth. 
Spent years 1865 to 1872 hunting gold in the Rockies. From 1872 
to 1876 in shoe business in Brockton, Mass.; 1878 and 1879 on 
exploring expedition in South America. Then in the coasting 
trade three years as a mariner. Storekeeper, 1882 to 1899; 1909 
to 1911 employed by gypsy moth commission. Died January 23, 
1916. 



As appears from the foregoing summaries, the 30 lepers thus 
far apprehended represent 11 different nationalities, namely, 4 
Chinese, 1 Japanese, 1 Swede, 3 British West Indies (colored), 
6 Cape Verde Islands, 2 Russian (Lettish), 4 Russian (He- 
brew), 2 Greek, 1 Italian, 1 Syrian, 4 American, 1 unknown. 

There were 23 males, 6 females and 1 whose sex was not 
shown in the record. 

Fifteen were single, 9 were married, 1 widow and 1 widower. 
In 4 cases the civil status w^as unascertained. Nine were 
known to have children with whom they had been living since 
the onset of the disease. 

Three were mariners or in some form followers of the sea, 6 
were outdoor laborers, 3 laundrymen, 2 cooks, 1 painter, 1 
brush maker, 1 factory-hand, 2 clerks, 1 dish washer, 3 house- 
wives, 2 domestics, 1 student and 1 teacher. The occupation 
of 3 was unascertained. 

In 3 of these cases the disease took the ansesthetic form. In 
2 the type would be most accurately defined as "mixed." 
Twenty-three cases exhibited the tubercular form. In 2 of the 



80 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

cases, both of them among the first found, the record fails to 
show the form of the disease. 

With the exception of Case 4, the history of which is un- 
known, every one of these patients was either an immigrant 
or showed a history of travel and sojourn in foreign countries 
or districts where leprosy is more or less prevalent. Further 
details regarding these cases may be found in the tabulation 
at page 110. 

First Methods of Care. 

Though at no time from the beginning has the gravity of 
this disease been underestimated, its acceptance as a community 
health problem was accomplished little more than a decade 
ago. The first cases were looked upon as sporadic, — so rare 
as not to be likely of recurrence. Isolation at quarantine in 
Boston Harbor took care of all but the Salem case, and this 
practice does not appear to have met objection from the city 
so long as the cases came singly. 

In 1904, however. Cases 6, 7 and 8 were discovered in rapid 
succession. Case 6 was the first one to be discovered in a 
small town remote from Boston and possessing no facilities for 
treatment. In addition, this patient had no legal settlement. 
It appears to have been this instance which first brought 
sharply forward the point that lepers without settlement are 
State cases chargeable to the State and subject to removal 
from the locality by the State Board of Charity. The town 
of Harwich at once requested the State Board of Charity to 
take the patient off their hands. Hence the Board, charged 
with the execution of the laws relating to State reimbursement 
for local aid rendered to persons ill with diseases dangerous to 
the public health, found itself burdened with the care of lepers 
in like manner with all other dangerous disease cases. Boston 
now added its request that the State take its unsettled lepers. 

Immediately numerous questions of authority arose, as, for 
instance, what power had the State Board to remove a leper 
from the locality in which he was found? And if the Board 
did have such power of removal, what objection, if any, could 
be raised by other cities and towns to transporting such a case 
through their territory. The opinion of the Attorney-General 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 81 

was sought upon both these points, his reply indicating that 
the Board did possess the power of removal, but might in the 
present state of the law meet valid legal objection to transport- 
ing such a case over town boundaries.^ 

To place the power of removal beyond dispute, a statute 
was passed (Acts of 1904, chapter 395) at the instance of the 
Board, providing that *' the state board of charity may, if found 
expedient, remove any person who is infected with a disease 
dangerous to the public health, and who is maintained or liable 
to be maintained by the commonwealth, to any hospital pro- 
vided for state paupers, or may provide such place of reception 
for such person as is judged best for his accommodation and 
the safety of the public, which place shall be subject to the 
regulations of the board, and may remove such person thereto." 

This act was approved June 2, 1904. Meanwhile Case 6, as 
already indicated, had been isolated at Harwich, the town in 
which it was discovered, and was under care in a small house 
which the Board took over from the town under an agreement 
to destroy upon removal of the patient and reimburse the 
owner therefor. The case was attended by Louis Edmunds, 
M.D., the local physician, at $3 a visit. A neighbor carried 
fresh water and supplies, receiving $1.50 a day for this service. 
Provisions were costing $1 a day; the rent $2 a month. Case 
7, having been found in Boston, was isolated at Gallop's Island, 
the State paying $5 a day for his maintenance there. 

State Infirmary the Logical Place for Isolation and Treatment. 
If that first unsettled case had been one of measles, smallpox 
or other usual disease declared dangerous to the public health, 
the course of the State Board would have been plain. The 
patient would have been removed to the State Infirmary, pro- 
vided the removal could have been effected without danger to 
the patient's health and the safety of the public.^ That it was 
a case of leprosy in no way altered the law or the obligations 
which the law imposed. But the dread name of leprosy did 
cause a marked change in the attitude of State Infirmary 
trustees and of the public generally, as events shortly proved. 

1 Op. A.G. II. 499. 2 See R. L., ch. 85, §§ ,14, 15; Acts of 1904, ch. 395. 



82 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

As foreshadowed by the passage of chapter 395, Acts of 
1904, clearing away all possible legal obstacles to the removal 
of lepers to the Infirmary, the Board was of the unanimous 
opinion that these cases should be so disposed of. They visited 
that institution, satisfied themselves that proper isolation of 
lepers was feasible there, and selected a site for a small isola- 
tion ward. But the trustees objected to the whole proposal.^ 

On June 29, 1904, following an invitation sent out by the 
Board, they appeared for a conference upon the step about to 
be taken. Their position was based on three several grounds: 
first, that it would disturb the peace of mind of about 1,800 
other inmates who were entitled to prior consideration; second, 
that with but 500 acres in the whole hospital tract, isolation 
could not be rendered sufficiently complete to prevent the prob- 
able spread of the disease; third, that the State hospital is not 
a place for contagious diseases, the practice being that such 
cases are cared for in the localities where found. 

The reply of the Board to all these points was that the best 
medical opinion was emphatic in asserting not only that lepers 
could be removed to the State hospital without danger to them- 
selves or the public, but also that they could be there main- 
tained without danger or discomfort to the other inmates. 
That contagious cases were not usually cared for at the State 
hospital was admitted, but the cause was stated to be not that 
there was anything in law or policy forbidding it, but that 
as a usual thing contagious cases cannot be removed from 
place to place without danger to themselves or the public 
safety. 

In this condition the matter drifted, Harwich suffering all 
the fear and the State paying all the bills, until September 2, 
when it was voted to send a communication to the trustees, 
stating that the Board was still of the opinion that the State 
hospital was the proper place for the care and treatment of 
these lepers, and asking to be informed what provision could 
be made for them and how soon they could be received. In 
the same meeting it was voted to ask the opinion of certain 
eminent physicians as to whether a leper could be cared for in 
a large institution like the State hospital without danger to 

1 Stenographic notes on hearing of June 6, 1905, p. 17. Files, S. B. C. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 83 

the other inmates, provided he be isolated. All three physi- 
cians replied that it was safe and practicable. 

On October 11, 1904, the trustees sent a formal communica- 
tion to the Board, as follows: — 

At a meeting of the trustees of the State hospital and State 
Farm held this day it was voted unanimously that we cannot 
give our consent to the transfer of certain leprous patients to 
the State hospital, as suggested in your letter of September 7. 
The reasons why such transfers should not be made were stated 
at the hearing before your Board June 29. We feel we should 
be neglectful of our duty should we consent to such transfers, 
thereby exposing 1,500 to 1,800 inmates, more or less, to that 
much-dreaded disease. We also feel confident that the action 
we have taken will be sustained and approved by the public. 



The time had now come when the State Board of Charity 
must perform its manifest duty under the law or, on the as- 
sumption that the position taken by the trustees of the State 
hospital was an accurate expression of public opinion, seek 
such modification of the law as would open a course more con- 
sonant with the wish of the people. The former course meant 
hospital treatment. The latter meant exile. The one meant 
kindly and efficient care in an institution where the cost of 
support was less than $3.50 a week for each patient, and in 
such proximity to relatives and friends as to soften materially 
the rigors of exile; the other meant individual solitude, shunned 
by all people, with no human being with whom to converse, 
no one to yield sympathy, and scarcely the means for aid in 
sudden illness. The expense of this latter method was estimated 
by the Board at approximately $2,500 a year per patient, or 
about fourteen times the per capita cost of maintenance of all 
inmates at the State hospital. 

Matters were not improved by the discovery, October 3, of a 
third leper. Case 8, at the Marine Hospital, Chelsea, and the 
request of the superintendent that the patient be removed 
immediately. This last demand was satisfied for the time by 
removal to Gallop's Island, upon condition that the Board 
should take the case away some time during the following Feb- 
ruary. 



84 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

In spite, however, of the stand taken by the Infirmary Trus- 
tees, it appears to have been reasonably certain that the lepers 
would have been taken to Tewksbury if the uncompromising 
attitude of the trustees and the strong public sentiment behind 
them had not manifested itself in such activity of citizens and 
oflScials as to render the pressure brought to bear upon the 
Board overwhelming, making it doubtful whether the Board 
could persist in its course and still retain its position of trust 
and confidence before the community. 

Alternative Proposals. 

On October 18, 1904, a committee of the Board was ap- 
pointed "to make inquiry as to the purchase of a tract of land 
somewhere in the State, with buildings thereon, or to be erected 
thereon, for the purpose of providing for the care, custody and 
treatment of the lepers at Boston and Harwich now at State 
charge." This action appears to have been taken under the 
authority contained in chapter 395, which empowered the Board 
"to provide such [hospital for State paupers] place of reception." 

At the meeting of December 16, 1904, it was voted "that 
the whole matter of purchasing land and providing buildings 
for the purpose in question be referred to the chairman, with 
full power." Meantime the committee had searched the less 
settled districts throughout the State, finding no location that 
seemed suitable. It had inquired about the islands along the 
coast and had several offers, among them Baker's Island in 
Salem Harbor. INIisery Island, it was found, could be had for 
from $75,000 to $100,000. Finally, it had approached the Bos- 
ton board of health with a proposal to set up an isolation hos- 
pital on Gallop's Island, but the plan did not meet with favor. 

The attitude of the Board in these inquiries as well as in the 
later plans for the establishment of a colony or hospital was 
that it was in any event but a temporary expedient, as the 
Federal government was expected to take charge of lepers 
pursuant to legislation which it was hoped and expected would 
be enacted. A resolve urging such a step was passed by the 
State Legislature at the instance of the Board and forwarded 
to^Congress.^ 

1 Resolutions, 1905, No. 2. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 85 



Proposed Colony in Brewster. 

On December 31, 1904, the chairman, acting under authority 
of the vote of December 16, purchased a tract of 68 acres, 
known as the Bassett Farm in the town of Brewster on Cape 
Cod, comprising farm land and buildings. The property lay 
within three miles of the spot where the Harwich case was 
isolated, and could be reached from Boston easily by train. 
The price paid for the land with its dwelling and sundry farm 
buildings was $1,550. 

But the people of Cape Cod would have none of it. They 
demanded a hearing and filed earnest protests which were 
signed by some 351 names. At the hearing, which was held at 
the State House on January 6, 1905, great emphasis was laid 
upon the damage which must result to this unique region when 
just at the point of blossoming out into a lucrative summer 
resort district. It was argued that whether leprosy was highly 
contagious or not, the people believe it to be so, and conse- 
quently no one with any choice would come by preference to a 
district where a colony of lepers was located. Thus taxable 
values w^ould fall, to the great detriment of the Commonwealth. 
The keynote of the several protests was ably expressed by a 
member of the Rhode Island bench when he said in his argu- 
ment for the placing of the incubus elsewhere, "I am full of 
sympathy for them [the lepers]. My heart is warm for them, 
but I, for one, do not want to see them on Cape Cod."^ 

The protestants, divining the weakness of the Board's posi- 
tion, insisted that the State hospital was the place provided by 
law, to which the Board was obliged to send all the lepers. 
But if that could not be effected, then an island off the coast 
should be selected, since the interests of great numbers of the 
people must be paramount to the w^elfare of a small group of 
aliens. The Brewster folk offered to repurchase the Bassett 
Farm at a profit to the State. 

Here in concrete form, then, was the solid public feeling 
prophesied in the letter of refusal from the trustees of the 
State hospital. For each citizen it was a determination, born 
of dread, that "this horrible thing shall not come near me or 

1 Stenographic notes on hearing of January 6, 1905, p. 20. Files, S. B. C. 



86 STATE BOAED OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

mine." x\s the people all felt the same way, the only recourse 
was to such natural isolation as might be afforded by an island 
off the coast. This plan seemed the least that could be con- 
ceded to the selfishness of the citizenry; the best that could be 
done for the lepers. As February was the month during which 
the Board was virtually pledged to remove the lepers from 
Gallop's Island, representations were made through the chair- 
man, with the result that on January 17, 1908, the Boston 
board of health consented to continue the care temporarily 
until such time as the State should be able to make provision 
for their reception. 

A separate isolation hospital seemed the only solution, but 
the Board was still unwilling to make a sacrifice which it knew 
to be unjust to the sufferers at the same time that it was preju- 
dicial to the true interests of the community. It made a last 
effort to test the public demand for complete exile. 

On January 25, 1905, a communication was sent to Mr. 
Douglas, then Governor, setting forth the facts as to the cases 
and as to the public attitude in full, and seeking his advice 
upon the wisdom of forcing isolation of the lepers at the State 
Infirmary. The reply was oral, and came in the form of a 
request to the chairman that other means of isolation and care 
be sought before trying the expedient of sending the cases to 
the State hospital. 

Thereafter the plan of care and treatment at that institu- 
tion was definitely abandoned, even though no island site was 
presently in view. 

Matters were not improved by the wide publicity which had 
by this time been given to the question of location. There 
were those who saw personal advantage to be gained out of 
the State's predicament. The price of land began to rise. 
Islands, variously labeled as ''gems of the sea" and famous for 
hardwood and sunsets, could be bought cheap at prices more 
appropriate to metropolitan building sites. This tendency of 
the individual, so usual when the government seeks land, w^as 
met in the usual way. 

An act^ was passed at the instance of the Board and ap- 
proved May 26, 1905, by the terms of which the Board was 

1 Acts of 1905, ch. 474. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 87 

authorized to take land by purchase or eminent domain, and 
to erect thereon a hospital for the custody, care and treatment 
of persons afflicted with leprosy. For this purpose it was au- 
thorized to expend not more than $50,000.^ 

There were in all, at this time, 5 lepers in the care of the 
Board, namely, the 3 already mentioned, and Cases 9 and 10 
which had been discovered since the first of the year, — Case 
9 on January 18, and Case 10 on April 22. Case 6 was still 
at Harwich, while all the others, except Case 10, were at Gallop's 
Island, under the immediate care of the Boston authorities, 
for which care and support the State was reimbursing the 
city in the sum of $5 per day for each patient. Case 10 
was isolated in Wareham, the locality in which she was dis- 
covered. 

While Gallops, Baker's, Misery, West Islands, and other pos- 
sible sites were still under consideration, a proposal was put 
forward to remove the State Prison from Charlestown to an 
island. On April 17 the Governor sent a special message to the 
House recommending such transfer to the island of Nashawena, 
one of the larger of the Elizabeth group in Buzzard's Bay. In 
this message he laid emphasis upon the advisability of making 
provision on the north promontory for the lepers. Hopes thus 
raised were soon dashed, as the prison transfer met with dis- 
favor and the leper colony fell with it. The problem did not 
seem likely of solution until the Board itself should take the 
initiative. 

Penikese. 
On July 18, after preliminary negotiation through the chair- 
man, a deed was taken to the island of Penikese (sometimes 
called Pune), a crescent-shaped expanse of about 74 acres, lying in 
Buzzard's Bay 14 miles almost due south of New Bedford, and 
about 7 miles from the nearest point of mainland. This island 
is one of the Elizabeth group, and forms the tip of the spur 
which extends back from the heel of Cape Cod. It lies about 
2 miles equidistant from the islands of Cutty hunk and Nasha- 

1 The legislative committee in charge of the bill reported the measure favorably, but reduced 
the grant from $50,000 to $25,000. At a later stage, upon assurances from the Board that such 
a reduction meant placing the hospital upon the mainland, the amount was restored to the 
original request. 



88 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

wena. Experience had already shown that no purchase could 
now go unchallenged. No sooner had the deed been recorded 
than protests began to pour in. This time they were led and 
championed by the real estate interests. Though the good people 
of the Cape had successfully defended their cranberries and their 
summer patrons against the Brewster settlement, they were 
now beset from the sea, and that, too, in apparent pursuance 
of their own argument favoring an island site. Nevertheless, 
they protested as a group to such a damage to their vested 
interests. But the Board had temporized and conceded enough 
— its duty now lay clear. It refused to grant a hearing, and 
the Governor remaining firm against these new appeals, the 
protestants did not prevail. 

As it becomes important in matters of agriculture and water 
supply, it is well to note here the main physical characteristics 
of the new purchase. Penikese, like all the Elizabeth group, is 
considered by geologists to be made up of a diluvial drift or 
detrital deposit pushed southward by the last ice cap from the 
region of Cape Ann, north of Boston.^ The general shape of the 
island gives it an outline not unlike that of the crookneck 
squash. A rounded cove juts into the outline very nearly 
dividing the land into two islands. As it is, the sea at time of 
storms breaks over the long low neck of land that divides the 
main portion from its smaller promontory. The soil is a red- 
dish sandy loam probably of diluvial origin, thickly sown with 
bowlders of granite, gneiss and graywacke. Though light, it is 
very fertile. Luxuriant grasses grow in the wild state, and all 
standard crops flourish with reasonable care. 

Though the island is strewn with bowlders of varying size, 
nowhere have rocks in place been found. It is probable, if the 
hypothesis as to the origin of the island be correct, that no 
ledges will be found, even at a considerable depth beneath the 
surface. The contour shows low-lying bluft's along the western 
shore and to the northward, with a gradual slope to the east. 
The highest point of land is 86 feet above the level of mean 
low water, and is continued in a ridge or backbone which ex- 
tends in a northerly direction forming the natural watershed 
between the two sides of the island. 

1 E. Hitchcock, "Geology of Massachusetts," 1S41, p. 379. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 89 

Beginning but a stone's throw to the eastward of this crest 
is a short gulley which extends to the cove and harbors a 
small grove of poplars, the only trees found upon the island. 
In this short ravine lies the sole fresh-water supply. 

At the time of purchase there was a wharf, little better than 
a slip, at the deepest part of the cove. This afforded 3 feet of 
water at mean low tide, and was sufficient for shoal draft boats. 
Because of the shallow depth and the treacherous rocky forma- 
tion which encircles the island, approach by boats of fair draft 
and considerable size is impossible. The common two-masted 
coasting schooner is the largest ship that can be used, and the 
landing in such case, even, must be made at mean or high tide. 
Though the approach looks bleak and cheerless in winter for lack 
of trees, the climate is more even and about 4 degrees warmer 
than upon the mainland. In summer the brilliant green grasses 
and the swarms of terns that breed upon the small promontory 
enliven the prospect. It is as inviting in the warmer months 
as it appears bleak in winter. The one factor in climate that 
has most influenced the operation of a hospital upon the island 
is the high winds which occur at frequent intervals the year 
round. 

Of more than passing interest is the history of this small 
estate. In the early 70 's it was the property of John Anderson, 
merchant, of New York. He gave it to Louis Agassiz for the 
establishment of a school of biolog}^ That eminent scientist, 
in conjunction with others, set up a dormitory and school just 
above the cove, and began a summer school of biology. This 
flourished for a couple of seasons, but declined mainly because 
of the illness of its founder. 

Eventually the property went back to Anderson who later 
(in 1883) disposed of it to those in w^hose possession it was at 
the time of purchase by the State. 

Development of the Hospital. 
At the time of purchase there were in the way of buildings 
upon Penikese a short stone-filled wharf, a farmhouse and a 
barn. The stone foundation of the Agassiz school remained, but 
the dormitory had been destroyed by fire. The single well fur- 
nished water that was not fit for use. 



90 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

The first moves by way of occupation, therefore, were the 
repair of the farmhouse, the sinking of a new well and the 
building of quarters for the patients. It appears from the pre- 
liminary memoranda on the first contracts that the Board, in 
addition to its problem of segregating the sexes, must have 
foreseen great difficulty in securing employees for such a remote 
locality and such a distasteful occupation. One of these evi- 
dences is a pencil sketch of the island, showing the men's and 
women's groups as far removed from the central administra- 
tion house as the limits of the land would permit. This pre- 
monition regarding the continuity of the service foreshadowed 
what was to appear later as one of the greatest obstacles to 
efficiency. 

In the beginning, as yearly to the present moment, the most 
important problem necessary of solution was that of trans- 
portation. The first attempt was the purchase of a small cat- 
boat sufficient to navigate the bay in fair weather. The next 
steps were a new well, the repairing of the old farmhouse and 
the building of four cottages for patients. These cottages, to 
be constructed and equipped at approximately $4,000 each, 
measured 27 by 36 feet ground-floor plan, and provided ac- 
commodation for a total of 8 patients. Each building con- 
tained four rooms, a bath and a kitchen. Each had a porch 
along the entire front, facing the west. 

By the middle of November all improvements had been 
completed and the hospital was ready for occupancy. A gaso- 
line pump had been installed at the new well and a 10,000- 
gallon reservoir constructed at the highest point of the island. 
Louis Edmonds, M.D., the physician who had discovered and 
attended the Harwich patient, was chosen superintendent. 
On November 17, 1905, the three lepers from Boston came by 
special train to join the two who had been isolated on the Cape, 
and on the following day, after a gale had abated, the transit 
was accomplished. There were no other ceremonies. 

Difficulties of Administration. 
Nominally, the requisites for an institution existed; practically, 
everything -was lacking except that which was necessary merely 
to sustain life. It was found that one mariner from the neigh- 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 91 

boring islands would run his catboat to New Bedford at S4.50 a 
trip if he could get back the same day, and he would carry as 
much as 2 tons if the sea was calm. But the islanders as a rule 
did not care to deal with Penikese at any price. This spirit of 
unfriendliness, if not of open hostility, made transportation so 
difficult and so costly that the superintendent usually risked Pune 
rip in his catboat rather than submit to the imposition. From 
December to April even this degree of independence was cut off, 
as the hospital boat must for that space of time be hauled out 
upon the land to protect it from the severe northeast storms 
that beat in from the offing. 

The greatest pinch caused by public hostility came and still 
comes at the time of transporting patients, though it is to be 
said that this is less manifest at the present time than formerly. 
At times the Board's officers have found themselves in a posi- 
tion similar to a ship in distress, bargaining for a tow. 

This lack of friendship was not confined to island neighbors. 
Grumbling has been frequently heard on the mainland that 
Penikese employees are permitted to come off the island and 
are even given a week's vacation. 

As public hostility is to be taken as a persistent fact, the 
solution of the perplexities in administration arising therefrom 
would seem to be some adequate and independent means of 
transportation. Towards this goal the Board has bent its efforts 
from the day the island was purchased down to the present. 
In all, it has purchased and used four small boats. Two of 
these were power dories and two were catboats. Storms have 
destroyed all but the last two, the 2S-foot catboat "Lincoln" 
and the tender, both of which are now in use. 

Three times the Board has approached the Legislature with 
requests for special appropriations, looking to the perfecting of 
means of transit to and from the island. The first of these 
was a request that a new wharf be constructed so as to permit 
the approach of vessels capable of making safe passage between 
the island and New Bedford. The result was that in October, 
1908, the Hirbor and Land Commissioners began the construc- 
tion of a pile vrharf 200 feet long and 20 feet wide. They 
completed the task towards the end of the following January. 
This improvement, though inadequate for the complete pur- 



92 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

pose in the mind of the Board, did make it possible to secure 
3| feet of water at the outer end of the wharf at mean low 
tide. 

The next recommendation was that of a dredging project to 
secure a channel 650 feet long and 150 feet wide leading from 
the roadstead to the wharf. This proposal, though repeated in 
three successive years, was never granted. It would have made 
it possible to carry coal and bulky commodities in larger car- 
goes at greatly reduced cost for freight. 

The third and last recommendation touching transportation 
was a request for $3,500 with which to purchase a 60-foot serv- 
ice launch. This boat was to carry a crew of two men, was 
to be shoal draft, motor driven, and capable of carrying about 
14 tons of miscellaneous freight. This request also was never 
granted, one of the chief objections to its consummation being 
the need of wharfage facilities at New Bedford, which could 
not be guaranteed. Another circumstance which has made the 
need of independent facilities seem less urgent has been the 
presence of the "Waquoit," a privately owned boat similar to 
that asked for, which has been available for weekly trips at a 
rate less for each year than the first cost of the boat asked for. 
At the present time, therefore, as in the beginning, the hospi- 
tal lies for some months of the year as remote from America 
in time and accessibility, almost, as the ports of Europe, for 
while it is possible to send freight and passengers each week 
throughout the winter to Cuttyhunk, patients cannot be sent 
by a common carrier, and neither freight nor passengers can be 
taken from Cuttyhunk across tumultuous Pune rip to the 
hospital except in fair weather. Buzzard's Bay has an unen- 
viable reputation for winter tempests, and so well deserved is 
this reproach that Penikese Hospital must at all times through- 
out the cold months be maintained in a state of preparedness 
for a weather siege to last from one to four weeks. 

This degree of remoteness has its reflection in difficulties of 
sending orders from the Board's offices in the State House, 
and the conveying of information from the hospital to the main- 
land. The purchasing of supplies must be carried on by an 
intricate double system, so that much-needed articles may reach 
the island without the delay incident upon coming ashore for 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 93 

them, and yet with the advantage of personal inspection before 
purchase. Bills must be audited in triplicate, so that the in- 
stitution and the Board's staff may each have a file in addition 
to the originals forwarded to the State Auditor. 

The unwillingness of employees to remain has alread}^ been 
indicated. The task for those who must bathe the patients, 
bind up their wounds and care for their quarters is sufficiently 
distasteful to explain their reluctance to remain long. With 
those, however, who do not come in contact with the patients 
— and the farm labor and domestics in the administration 
house do not — the explanation must be found elsewhere. Ex- 
perience has shown that the chief obstacle to continuity of 
service is the solitude, and this applies to the nurses and attend- 
ants as well as to those who do not come into contact with 
the patients. From the hill on Penikese one may look away 
to the mainland or may see the small white houses upon 
Cuttyhunk. In clear weather the smokestacks of New Bed- 
ford show red in the sun. Save for these glimpses of the out- 
side world, the little family of patients and their attendants, 
the domestic animals, the larks and bobwhites and the gulls, 
make up the sum total of animate nature. Ships go by but 
they keep their own secrets. 

It is not surprising that the temper of gregarious man cannot 
long endure it. Solitude may be precious by way of change; 
it is deadly where change is lacking. A constant sameness saps 
the sweetness from the best personality, ruffles the gentlest 
temper and tends to create petty jealousies and feuds in minia- 
ture. And so it is with Penikese. The rough labor quits from 
sheer lonesomeness, and the best help is retained only through 
the earnest and winning character of the superintendent, for 
in its superintendent the island family has found its release 
from utter solitude. In all, since the besjinning there have been 
87 different regular employees at the island, even though the 
average number employed at any one time during that period 
has not exceeded 10. In addition, there have been numerous 
temporary employees not listed on the regular pay roll. The 
first superintendent remained one year, being succeeded on Jan- 
uary 1, 1907, by Frank H. Parker, M.D., who is at present in 
office. 



94 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

If one reflects, therefore, upon the effects of loneliness on 
robust, well-nourished, and easily contented laborers, some in- 
sight is readily gained into the broodings of the leper, ill as he 
is, racked often with rheumatic pain and burning with leprous 
fever, — a person without hope, committed against his will to 
this no-man's land, so empty of all the sounds and associations 
that his experience in life has made companionable and com- 
forting to him. 

The Penikese leper is not American. He is not English. 
Here are almost as many different races as there are different 
individuals. And each retains his pride of race, his contempt 
for all things alien to his native stock. The result is a tendency 
towards social stratification that would seem ludicrous did it 
not make the unfortunate an enemy to his own happiness. 

Bearing these things in mind, one would not have been sur- 
prised in the early days of the hospital to hear the cottage 
door slam at his approach and see the blinds drawn quickly. 
The hermit who broods and nourishes his loneliness is a hermit 
indeed — he shuns society; and so w^ith these hermits of Peni- 
kese. In the earlier times they would often run to their cot- 
tages at the visitor's approach and draw the blinds, refusing to 
be seen or spoken to. 

Another side to this anti-social tendency is the hostility to 
the administration which it engenders. To the heavy-hearted 
patient the doctor represents a community that without just 
cause has found him in a distress not of his own doing; has 
taken from him his liberty — his sole possession remaining; 
and has cast him out to the elements. No earnest care, no 
tenderness can compensate him for that act. Society has 
made him its enemy. Therefore weak though he be he will 
wage such war as he may. When food is issued to him in any 
quantity he will use a little and throw the rest away. When 
water is free for the turning of a faucet he will let it run all 
night, well knowing that the supply of fresh water is very lim- 
ited. It having become known that the kindly superintendent 
will do all in his power to satisfy every request that is at all 
reasonable, he will be asked to furnish all sorts of delicacies to 
be discarded, a variety of pets to be neglected, a garden to be 
forgotten. All such difficulties and more, due not to native 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 95 

meanness, but rather to the soHtude and the injustice of such 
rigid isolation, have confronted the administration at every 
turn. 

The natural obstacle . of poor transportation facilities has 
been mentioned. An equilly difficult problem has been the 
water supply. The first surface well proved insufficient, so 
that resort was had to hogsheads to catch water from the 
roofs. This was used for all but drinking purposes. A maxi- 
mum of 400 gallons per day was dl that could be pumped 
from the well. This condition ran along, supplemented in time 
of drought by small cargoes of fresh water hauled from New 
Bedford in barrels, until September, 1910. At that time a long 
period of drought was just terminating. It was determined to 
sink a driven well in an effort to secure a subterranean supply 
that would be constant and adequate. This attempt went so 
far as to drive a hole 147 feet with no result but brackish water. 
It w^as then abandoned. In 1912 two large wells were dug in 
the ravine, thus gathering about all the water afforded by the 
watershed. From these the pump sends the supply to the new 
reservoir which was built in 1907. Within the year, however, 
more water had to be hauled from New Bedford, and there is 
at the present time no reasonable likelihood of a supply ade- 
quate for growing needs unless a deeper vein can be tapped 
by a driven well. 

Not least among the obstacles to administration are the 
natural pests which abound. Penikese is one of the very few 
breeding grounds upon the Atlantic coast for Wilson's tern, 
the graceful forked-tail gull. These birds at breeding time 
cover the island like cumulous clouds. While the young are in 
the grass gaining strength to fly it has been found impossible 
to mow the crop. The destruction of the birds is so great as 
to endanger the life of the breeding ground, to say nothing of 
spoiling the hay. 

The other, and still more serious, pest is the mosquito, both 
fresh and salt-water varieties, which breeds in the marshy 
beach behind the sea bowlders. At favorable seasons these 
insects issue in swarms as dense as those of the ephemerida 
along the marshes of our western rivers in July. This pest is 
the more disliked because it may bite the patient and there- 



96 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

after light upon the non-leprous inhabitants. Studies made of 
the mosquito show him to be a dangerous carrier, if danger of 
inoculation from lepers is as real as supposed. 

Flies also constitute a pest, but are kept reasonably in hand 
through screening the manure pit and destroying all known 
breeding places. 

Of the unseen pests the greatest is island fever, an affliction 
of the live stock. Its origin is unknown. The early supposi- 
tion that it came from a kind of sorrel abundant on the Eliza- 
beth islands has been refuted by the presence of fever in Janu- 
ary. The most reasonable assumption is that it arises from 
some disproportion in diet, not yet understood. Approximately 
half the cows that have been brought to Penikese have had 
island fever, and several have had to be destroyed because of it. 

Social Life of ike Patients. 

The backbone of the island divides the administration quarters 
from the hospital group. The latter is composed of four cottages, 
one of which stands off to the southerly shore by itself, and a 
hospital building formed by the building in of the interval be- 
tween the fifth and sixth of the original cottages. This hospital 
building was constructed in 1910. There is in addition a small 
laundry building containing sterilizing and power-washing ma- 
chinery. The cottages house two patients each. The hospital 
building has provision for ten inmates besides general kitchen, 
dining room, li\'ing room and quarters for nurses and attendants. 
All of the buildings except the new laundry are of wood. 

The administration house, built in 1912-13, is of concrete, 
and furnishes living quarters for the superintendent and family, 
the resident physician and family and all the general employees. 
There are in addition a barn and sufficient outbuildings to 
house all the live stock and machinery. 

Just as the tendency of exile is toward brooding and melan- 
choly, so to a complementary degree has the effort of the ad- 
ministration been toward the development of facilities for social 
enjoyment. As a result, the leper condemned to Penikese may 
sit and brood, but if he does so it is by his own choice; there 
is ample alternative. He has the freedom of the island, except 
that he mav not come into the administration house. He mav 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 97 

fish from a boat anywhere near the shore and have his fresh 
fish cooked to order for him if that is his wish. He may have 
a garden of flowers or vegetables, or both; and may have it 
tended for him if his awn health is so poor that he is unable 
to do it himself. He is at liberty to visit any other patient 
except such as may be dangerously ill and the doctor's orders 
prevent. In the hospital building is a large living room. Here 
the patients have talking machines, a library, an organ, a pool 
table and other games. Here, also, religious services are held 
each Sabbath, and entertainments at frequent intervals on 
week days. 

In their several cottages the patients have flowers. Because 
of the nature of the disease no pets are allowed that can go 
about on the island. Cats and dogs are therefore banished 
from the hospital side. Instead, many of the patients have 
parrots. This friend of the sailor is very much at home in the 
Penikese cottages, and is much liked by inmates. The impres- 
sion left upon the visitor to these cottage sitting rooms is pleas- 
ant, even though during his entire stay he is more than reviled 
in Spanish or Portuguese from a near-by cage. 

Patients who are not bedridden take their meals in the gen- 
eral dining room. The menu is arranged for them, but any 
patient may, with the approval of the doctor, have any special 
dish that he craves. As is usual in INIassachusetts State insti- 
tutions, special dinners are provided for Thanksgiving and 
Christmas. A similar latitude is permitted in the matter of 
clothing, games, books, music and other objects that take the 
patient's fancy. Thus he may within reason make his choice 
of clothing. The inmates are not clothed in uniform suits, as 
required by economy in large institutions. One patient was 
provided with all the materials for the construction of a wireless 
telegraph unit. This was constructed, used and later supple- 
mented by a public gift of an additional unit. Another pa- 
tient, a Japanese, who possessed a high degree of skill as a 
cabinet maker, was supplied with a kit of tools and a bench, 
that he might pass a part of his time at that pleasurable occu- 
pation. 

Still another field of activity has been opened to patients. 
Wherever they have been physically able and have wished so 



98 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

to occupy themselves they have been allowed to help with the 
care of their fellows. Thus on several occasions when patients 
have been very low other inmates have acted as attendants, 
supplementing the staff in caring for the sick patient's room and 
meeting his many needs. Compensation of a moderate sort is 
allowed for such assistance. For years one of the Chinese pa- 
tients, a laundryman by occupation before coming to the island, 
has done all the patients' washing. His modest income of S3 
a week is sent home regularly for the schooling of his son in 
China. 

All facilities available are provided for the visitation of rela- 
tives. Because of the remote location and the great expense 
of reaching the island, however, visits are comparatively few. 
As almost all the lepers, w^ho come to care in this State have 
been possessed of little or no financial means, the expense of 
visitation and the difficulties of finding the way to such an 
out-of-the-way place have left the unfortunate almost a com- 
plete exile from his kin. 

Nevertheless, in these latter days of the hospital, patients 
do not shun the visitor. They are smiling, and grateful even 
for the brief moments of an inspector's rounds. Morbid dis- 
content, such as might be expected under such conditions, is 
a rare occurrence. In the earlier stages of the disease, when 
mental excitation is apt to occur, patients have for brief periods 
seemed greatly disturbed. This has been especially true of the 
Italian patient. Careful mental examination has, however, 
shown no permanent aberration. The Japanese patient, a per- 
son of very considerable mental capacity, has brooded over the 
refusal of the Japanese government to receive him back into 
his own country, and has shown himself distressingly unhappy. 
On two occasions he has sought to escape from the island, in 
one of which he succeeded so far as to reach Boston, but was 
immediately apprehended. These are the only instances of 
such attempts in the history of the hospital. At the present 
time, with the oncoming of the mental lethargy characteristic 
of the advanced stages of the disease, this patient has become 
peaceful and reasonably content. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 99 



Isolation Colony versus Hospital. 

With but 5 patients in his custody, the first superintendent 
had full charge of medical care and treatment without assistance. 
In 1907, after the present superintendent had begun his service, 
4 new cases were added, and in 1909, 3 more. One having died, 
there remained 11 patients under care. It was an excessive bur- 
den for one doctor charged with all the duties of the superin- 
tendency and without nurses or attendants, save for the aid 
rendered by his wife. It seemed necessary, therefore, to add to 
the expenditures, already enormous, in order to supplement the 
medical staff. 

Parallel with this need there was also the problem of keep- 
ing the employees spurred to conscientious effort, and, in gen- 
eral, of some means of combating the tendencies of isolation, 
loneliness, inaccessibility and the unwillingness of people to 
attend lepers for mere return in money. 

In the end the two needs were met by one single course of 
action, for it began to be apparent to the Board that a hospital 
for the care and treatment of the most dreaded disease known 
to mankind must, especially when located as remotely as Pen- 
ikese, inevitably tend ever to become less and less a hospi- 
tal and more and more a mere dumping ground for persons 
cast out from society and shunned by all men. A return in 
money — sufficient to induce individuals to perform all needed 
services under ordinary conditions of life — is not here suffi- 
cient to insure conscientious service for any considerable length 
of time. In brief, the staff must be inspired with a genuine 
enthusiasm of some sort to hold its interest at the point of 
hospital efficiency. The hospital had a superintendent of ability 
and of rare good courage, but he needed more help and that 
help needed more enthusiasm. 

This problem was met through the co-operation of the Har- 
vard Medical School, and by the addition of a medical advisory 
committee of volunteer physicians. ^ The plan was to make 
Penikese a station for scientific research into the pathology of 
leprosy. The method of execution was the employment of a 

1 Harvey P. Towle, M.D., Boston; Charles J. White, M.D., Boston; Joseph W. Proctor, M.D., 
Maiden; Simeon Burt Wolbach, M.D., Boston; Clara P. Fitzgerald, M.D., Worcester. 



100 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

resident physician who should be also a research student of the 
disease. The new employee was to care for the patients under 
the direction of the superintendent, and was at the same time 
to carry on intensive laboratory study. For this latter function 
the small laboratory at the hospital was to act as a receiving 
station, behind which the laboratories of the Harvard Medical 
School were to stand ready to receive experimental material, 
and with it to develop experimentation on a more elaborate 
scale. To render the bond still closer, Dr. Simeon B. Wolbach, 
pathologist, already a member of the advisory committee, was 
appointed visiting pathologist. 

The new physician. Dr. James A. Honeij, was appointed 
November 1, 1912, and two nurses and an orderly were soon 
added. Since that time the interest of the employees and 
patients has been quickened. Patients who, in the first year 
of the hospital, ran to hide upon the approach of visitors, now 
come forward offering themselves for such special observation 
as research may require. The results of study have been far 
greater than was expected. 

In January, 1914, there appeared for the first time in com- 
plete form "A Critical Review of the Bacteriology of Human 
and Rat Leprosy."^ This manuscript was by Wolbach and 
Honeij, collaborating, and forms a noteworthy contribution to 
the literature of the subject. In March of that same year 
the hospital reported having obtained in the cultivation experi- 
ments an organism originally described by Kedrawski, the 
Russian observer, and which apparently had not thus far 
been fully described. A manuscript was therefore published 
under the title of "The Diphtheroid Bacillus from Leprosy 
Lesions."^ The view taken by the authors was that this 
organism was merely a stage in the life of the acid-fast bacillus 
of leprosy. 

Between this date and March, 1915, no reports were made 
save some minor observations on flies as carriers of the bacillus, 
and a foreshadowing of certain discoveries relating to the pulse. 
In March, 1915, appeared a final report entitled "A Study of 
Leprosy: with Especial Reference to the Pulse and Tempera- 

1 Jour. Med. Res., Vol. XXIV., No. 3, N.S., pp. 367^23, January, 1914. 

2 Jour. Med. Res., Vol. XXV., No. 1, N.S., pp. 1-8, March. 1914. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 101 

ture.''^ In this study it was demonstrated for the first time 
that there occurs a definite clinical temperature and pulse 
curve diagnostic and prognostic of leprosy; also that there is a 
frequent and persistent- occurrence of a high morning pulse 
rate — "morning pulse" — in all cases. It was shown that a 
constant high pulse rate is most marked in progressive and 
advanced cases, and that a persistent high pulse rate without 
a corresponding elevation of temperature of prolonged dura- 
tion is found after "toxic-febrile'' attacks. Finally, there was 
demonstrated a correlation of temperature and pulse in early 
cases in contrast with a gradual increase of pulse rate with- 
out similar temperature reactions in progressive and advanced 
cases. 

The most important report that has come recently from the 
staff is entitled "Leprosy — the Presence of Acid-fast Bacilli 
in the Circulating Blood and Excretions."^ This study, di- 
rected at a vital link in determining the contagiousness of the 
disease, established the presence of the lepra bacillus in the 
circulating blood and in the excretions during quiescent periods. 
Since a large part of the clinical work must be based upon the 
assumption that the organism is so present in the circulation, 
the determination of the fact is basic. ^ 

The development of this institution as a station for scientific 
research is a process still in its infancy. Furthermore, it re- 
mains to be seen how far present progress is due to the inno- 
vation over and above the painstaking service of the superin- 
tendent. Nevertheless, the fact is unmistakable that in the 
face of tendencies that strike at good standards of care and 
treatment, the institution has come up steadily from the condi- 
tion of a colony of exiles to the standard of a modern hospital 
for the care and treatment of chronic contagious cases; and 
the by-products in the way of scientific knowledge of the dis- 
ease are so substantial even at this early date as to command 
recognition and favorable comment from scholars in widely 
separated parts of the world. 

1 Bost. Med. and Surg. Jour., Vol. CLXXII., No. 16, pp. 580-584; No. 17, pp. 629-638; No. 
18, pp. 668-672; App. 22, 29, May 6, 1915. 

2 Jour. Infect. Dis., Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 376-387, September, 1915. 

3 For minor publications of research at Penikese, see Bost. Med. and Surg. Jour., Vol. CLXX., 
No. 3, pp. 85-87; No. 7, pp. 233-235; Vol. CLXXIII., No. 2, pp: 48-53. 



102 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Medical Treatment. 

At the present time the medical staff consists of the super- 
intendent, who is a physician, the resident physician, who is a 
specialist in leprosy, two nurses and one orderly. Other em- 
ployees minister to the various needs of the institution, but these 
five persons make up the force that comes directly in contact 
with the patients. The resident physician is responsible for a 
complete system of records, a task made easier by the fact that 
completeness and absolute accuracy in the daily records are neces* 
sary to the conduct of pathological experimentation. It is his 
duty to prescribe daily treatment, and to direct the nurses and 
orderly in their tasks. The orderly must see that all the living 
quarters of the patients are kept clean, and must carry out the 
doctor's orders as to visitation and the forcing of careless patients 
into the fresh air. 

The bases of treatment are very similar to those for pul- 
monary tuberculosis, — fresh air, sunshine, unbroken sleep and 
a regular and ample supply of nourishing food. In the early 
days leprolin was used as a specific remedy; but results did not 
seem to warrant its continuance. Shortly after its abandon- 
ment here it went out of use in the Orient, and consequently 
out of the market. The only specific of value that has been 
steadily used is chaulmoogra oil. This, in connection with other 
treatment, improves the condition of the patients in most in- 
stances. It is especially helpful in reducing superficial ulcera- 
tion. In conjunction with the X-ray it gives the physician 
power to relieve to a considerable extent the suffering attend- 
ant upon the breaking down of leprous lesions. In some in- 
stances patients at Penikese have been so far benefited by 
these combined methods that the outward appearances of the 
disease have practically disappeared. 

As previously stated, the hospital building is of wood. It is 
poorly adapted for the uses of a modern contagious hospital. 
But cleanliness and the use of asbestos cement plaster, imper- 
vious to dust and air currents, have greatly improved it. The 
dispensary consists of a single room in this hospital building. 
It affords necessary facilities for routine treatment, but is far 
from adequate for the best development of daily care. For 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 103 

two years the Board has sought an appropriation for the con- 
struction of a fireproof modern hospital building, which should 
contain facilities for bathing, for dispensary and X-ray treat- 
ment, and oflBces for the doctor and the nurses. It would pro- 
vide also for the changing of clothing of the patients, sending 
the soiled garments direct to the laundry without permitting 
unclean clothing on the treatment side of the building. This 
structure was to be one story in height with a solarium on the 
roof. Thus far the Legislature has refused the $40,000 asked 
for this purpose, and the smaller number of patients in the 
present year has induced the Board to withdraw the request 
for the time being. 

Medical records date back only to January 13, 1912, the day 
on which the old administration house with all its contents, 
including the records, was destroyed by fire. The records as 
now kept are more elaborate than formerly, including a chart- 
ing system with complete daily records for each patient. 

Present Methods of Administration. 
. The plant as it stands has accommodation for IS patients, and 
is capable of expansion without new construction to accommo- 
date 5 or 6 more. There are upon the island 13 buildings of all 
sorts, namely, 5 for housing and treating the patient, and 8 for 
all other purposes. Of the administration group the two store 
sheds, the pump house and the root cellar are all very small 
buildings. The bungalow is a shed used for housing animals for 
experimental purposes. The important structures, therefore, are 
the administration house and the laundry of concrete, and the 
hospital building, four cottages and the barn, all of wood. 

Since there is such scarcity of water, and the expense of 
keeping sea water stored in sufficient quantity to allow fire 
pressure is prohibitive, the only safeguard against fire is the 
use of chemicals. Underwriters' extinguishers are placed in all 
corridors, and in addition a 25-gallon chemical hand engine is 
kept in readiness. For all emergencies discovered early this 
protection is adequate. After a fire has gained headway the 
chance of saving the property would be very small. Li view 
of this situation the Board has, since the fire of 1912, refused 
to allov\' any more wooden construction upon the island. Con- 



104 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Crete is now used because the sand and gravel are found in 
ample quantity and are readily accessible. 

Lighting is now accomplished by electric current generated 
by a 20-horse power oil engine in connection with a battery. 
The arrangement permits the employment of a single unli- 
censed engineer. In the beginning oil lamps were used. The 
risk was so great, however, in view of the numbness of the 
fingers so common among the patients, and the high wind so 
frequent upon the island, that the Legislature was urged to 
appropriate sufficient funds for a power system. This was 
granted in 1912, at the time the new administration house was 
authorized. 

Cost of the State's Enterprise to December 1, 1915. 

Prior to the opening of the hospital the State government 
expended $9,469.21 in taking care of the first cases. Since the 
founding of the institution a total of $146,798.49 has been spent, 
making the maintenance cost of the problem to December 1, 
1915, $156,267.70. 

The cost of land, buildings and special equipment is as fol- 
lows: — 



1905. 



1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 



1912. 

1913. 
1914. 



For the purchase of Penikese Island . . . . 
For remodeling and improving existing building and 

constructing four cottages .... 
Further improvements and one new cottage 

Catboat 

New hospital building 

Additional on the hospital building 
Additional on the hospital building 

Water supply, wells, etc 

Furnishings for hospital building . 

New administration building and equipment 

Electric light and refrigerating plant 

Additional on wharf and wells 

Laundry building and equipment . 



$25,000 00 



24,999 56 
8,498 34 
1,943 25 

12,000 00 

4,000 00 

573 92 

1,790 37 

1,330 89 

29,645 42 
5,000 00 
1,257 95 
2,424 61 

$118,464 31 



If the cost of all construction and special improvements be 
added to the cost of maintenance, upkeep and all other items 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 105 

entering into the expense, the total outlay by the State gov- 
ernment since finding the first leper reaches the grand total of 
$274,732.01. Since there have been but 24 lepers in the custody 
of the State, 3 of whom were deported shortly after their dis- 
covery, and 2 others of whom were released within two years 
of discovery, it becomes apparent that the tetter of fear in 
which the public has demanded this separate institution located 
at such a distance from market and the usual lines of travel 
has been excessively costly. If the care and maintenance of 
all the cases be fixed at approximately the equivalent of main- 
taining one case for 5,772 weeks, the cost of such care at the 
State Infirmary, counting the average per capita rate for all 
classes of inmates, and allowing nothing for transportation, 
would be $20,202. The excessive cost of transportation would 
add a considerable amount, and some thousand must be allowed 
for an isolation ward in which to house them. When very 
liberal allowances are made, however, the discrepancy between 
the two totals is so great as to establish beyond question the 
improvident nature of the course taken by the public. It is 
a course defensible only upon the ground of dire public neces- 
sity. Experience has revealed no such necessity, but is, on the 
contrary, demonstrating more and more the unreasonableness 
of the panic. 

F resent Policies of the Board in Administering the Hospital. 

After ten years of struggle with the problem of leprosy, the 
State Board of Charity has evolved certain principles of action 
which are worthy of record in this chronicle. These relate to 
all phases of the task, including the relationship between ]Massa- 
chusetts and other jurisdictions with similar problems. First 
and foremost, the Board still adheres to its previous judgment 
regarding the method of isolation. It still believes that these 
patients should be cared for at the State Infirmary, where 
nearness to friends and relatives will soften the rigors of their 
exile, and where the cost to the taxpayers will be but a tithe 
of the present necessary outlay, but where, nevertheless, the 
public health will be fully as well protected as now. This view 
has been insistently repeated in the Board's annual reports, in 
the hope that public opinion may change with the spread of a 



106 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

truer understanding of the relatively non-contagious nature of 
the disease. 

Regarding the attitude toward other States the Board has 
received in all seven requests from other jurisdictions to receive 
lepers at Penikese, Massachusetts to be reimbursed for the cost 
of their care. Some of these requests were urgent; some were 
couched in pleading tones. One sought, by approaching the 
Governor, to bring pressure to bear upon the Board to receive 
its case. In every instance the officers in charge appear from 
their letters to have been driven by panic among their constitu- 
ents. But after careful study of the limits of its own authority, 
and of the elements of a correct public policy, all these appli- 
cations have been refused. ^ 

A definite stand has been taken with reference to still another 
aspect of this problem. Since 1901 there has been intermittent 
agitation for Federal assumption of the entire problem. At 
this writing the matter is especially active before the Federal 
Senate, a bill providing Federal control having passed the House 
by a substantial majority. In this regard, the attitude of the 
Board is expressed in records under date of October 3, 1913, 
in a resolution to the effect that the Board favor Federal care 
and treatment of lepers if, as they believe, it will result in more 
humane and more scientific treatment for persons afflicted with 
the disease, and will afford greater opportunities for scientific 
discovery with reference to causes and possible cure. 

Finally, with reference to internal administration, the hard 
position of the patient has been fully recognized. He is 
confined against his will. He may not go among his fellow 
men. He is denied almost all that life held dear. In this plight 
the Board is firm in its determination that he shall not be ex- 
ploited nor made an exhibition of. As a result of this determi- 
nation, visitation of the hospital is confined to officials, bona fide 
students, relatives and friends. The merely curious are obliged 
to stay away. Furthermore, visitors are not permitted to bring 
cameras upon the island, and no photographs of patients are 
permitted except for the purpose of medical record. Neither 
may the name of any patient be used or his identity revealed 

1 Requests have been received from Kentucky, South Carolina, Minnesota, Rhode Island, 
Pennsylvania (2) and the District of Columbia. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 107 

without his full consent. From the point of view of the jour- 
nalist these rules seem unduly severe. From the point of view 
of the exile they are no more than just, no less than kind. 
The rules and regulations governing the conduct of the hospital 
are appended. 

Now that the enterprise of caring for these sick persons has 
reached the dignity of a separate State institution, it is the 
belief of the Board that its administration should not longer 
be left to a supervisory Board of Charity, but like other of our 
State hospitals be administered by a separate board of trustees, 
who shall give their services and who shall carry on their activ- 
ities under the supervision of this Board. It has therefore 
recommended to the Legislature the creation of such a separate 
board. The rules now in force governing the administration 
of Penikese Hospital are as follows : — 



Division of Responsibility. 

Subject to the direction of the Board, authority in the admin- 
istration of Penikese Hospital is vested in the superintendent. 
He shall prescribe the duties of his several employees, and shall 
be accountable to the Board for the proper conduct of the insti- 
tution. 

He shall, subject to the authorization and approval of the 
Board, appoint all employees, and may remove them in like 
manner. 

Medical Care of Patients. 

It shall, in general, be the duty of the resident physician, 
subject to the order and direction of the superintendent, to care 
for the patients, and with the assistance of nursing staff and 
orderly, to administer to their needs in so far as the same relate 
to leprosy. The superintendent shall, so far as practicable, relieve 
the resident physician of duties arising out of the needs of patients 
not immediately related to leprosy. 

It shall be the further duty of the resident physician, subject 
to direction, to keep full and complete medical records of each 
patient, and he shall for such purpose keep himself informed of 
the best and most modern methods of recording medical data. 
He shall further make earnest and detailed study of the pathology 
of the disease, representing the Board in this particular in its 
co-operation with the Harvard Medical School and medical au- 
thorities elsewhere. 



108 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

He shall make to the superintendent a report, monthly, of his 
work, both routine and special, in such form as the superin- 
tendent may prescribe, which report the said superintendent 
shall transmit with his monthly report to the Board. 



Absences from Duty. 
Xo person employed in the administration of the hospital shall 
be allowed to absent himself from duty at the hospital while 
under pay, except on business for the institution or the admin- 
istrative Board, or on vacation. All vacations must be previously 
arranged for with the superintendent. All necessary absences 
on personal business shall be counted as a part of the next vaca- 
tion period to which the employee so absenting himself may be en- 
titled. After December 1, 1915, no vacation shall be allowed for 
a period covering more than fourteen working days. 

Purchase of Supplies. 
No supplies shall be purchased, nor shall the hospital be in 
any way obligated by any person other than the Board's officers, 
except at the direction of the superintendent in writing. 

Patients' Privileges. 

For the purpose of physical exercise, subject to direction of 
the medical staff, which for this purpose shall comprise the 
superintendent, resident physician, nurses or orderlies, patients 
are permitted to go upon any part of the island west of the 
division fence; but no patient shall be permitted beyond these 
limits without the expressed consent of the superintendent. 

Subject to like direction, patients shall be permitted to row 
in skiffs or rowboats in the waters adjacent to the island, but 
shall not be permitted to come ashore at any point east of the 
division fence. 

Publications relating to the Institution. 
No manuscript or communication descriptive of the patients 
or tending to identify them, or any of them, or in any manner 
relating to the institution and intended for publication, shall 
be issued by the superintendent or staff without the Board's 
approval. 

Visitation. 
No person other than a State officer, a member of the advisory 
board, an employee or a member of the immediate family of 
superintendent or staff shall be permitted to land upon Penikese 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 109 

Island without permission of the State Board of Charity in 
writing, previously obtained, signed by the chairman, vice-chair- 
man or by the secretary as directed; or unless accompanied by 
a member of the Board. 

No friend or relative of a staff member or employee shall be 
permitted to land except with the permission of the superintend- 
ent in writing, previously obtained; and no person other than the 
wife or husband of a staff officer or employee shall be allowed 
to land without permission of the Board as required herein. Per- 
mission thus granted by the superintendent shall set forth the 
name, address and occupation of the visitor, and the beginning 
date and expected duration of stay. Upon the issuance of every 
such permit the superintendent shall forthwith mail a duplicate 
copy thereof to the Board. 

The superintendent shall keep a visitors' record in a form 
prescribed by the Board, and every visitor to the island, regard- 
less of the shortness of his stay, shall be required to sign said 
record. 

Every visitor, bearing written permission, shall surrender his 
permit to the superintendent or his agent at the time of landing, 
and all permits thus surrendered shall be forwarded by the super- 
intendent to the Board, endorsed by him with the date on which 
they were surrendered. 

The superintendent shall cause the rules governing visitation 
to be posted and maintained at the wharf and in the adminis- 
tration building in such convenient form as to be easily seen and 
read. 

No photographs of Penikese Hospital patients, nor any photo- 
graphs of such nature as to disclose the identity of said patients, 
shall be taken for any purpose other than the medical records 
kept by the hospital; and no person other than the superintend- 
ent, his officers or the advisory board shall bring or have a 
camera upon the island without the written permission of the 
State Board of Charity. 

Supervision. 

It shall be the duty of the Board's officers by frequent inspec- 
tion of the hospital to note any infraction of the foregoing rules 
and to report the same forthwith to the Board. 

All details of administration not specifically treated in these 
rules shall be carried out at the direction of the superintendent, 
whose orders in such matters shall be absolute. For this pur- 
pose he shall make and post such rules, subject to the Board's 
approval, as he may deem appropriate. 



no 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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HHHHHHHHH 



116 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OF INSTITUTIONS. 

The Board in its supervision of the financial administration 
of the several State charitable institutions — the plant and its 
upkeep and maintenance — inspects each institution through 
paid officers at least once each month, and through its own 
committees and individual members at frequent intervals. 

Monthly analysis is made of articles of food, coal, hay and 
grain purchased, and tabulated results sent to each institution. 
In addition, sundry tables covering the year's operations have 
been prepared. 

The following tables are designed to show in detail the 
financial condition of each institution. A convenient summary 
of the State's property represented by each institution is fol- 
lowed by an analysis of receipts and a similar analysis of 
expenditures. Finally, a detailed analysis of expenditures is 
followed by a comparison of all appropriations and the expendi- 
tures made therefrom. 

I. Inventory. 

Inventory of State property represented by the institutions 
is shown in Table IV. This tabulation is in four parts. Farts 
I. and 11. exhibit realty; Part III. shows personalty; Part IV. 
summarizes the whole. 

From Parts I. and II. it appears that on November 30, 1915, 
the twelve State charitable institutions returned $5,562,717.56 
in real estate, $354,195.12 of this amount being land and 
$5,208,522.44 representing buildings. Chattels real and other 
items of betterment are not separately considered; hence water, 
telephone, fire and sewerage systems are to be found in the 
miscellaneous columns under the heading of "buildings." 

Part III. shows the uniform analysis of personal property 
adopted by the State Auditor, to the amount of $1,206,967.65. 
The total valuation, real and personal, as shown in Part IV., 
is $6,769,685.21. 



Part I.l GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



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120 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 



Table IV. Part IV. 



Inventory of the State Charitable Institutions 
Concluded. 







SCMMART 








1 REAL AXD PEBSOXAL 


ESTATE 


Total 
Inventory 


INSTITUTIONS 


1 

Real 
Estate 


Personal 
Estate 


Total Real 

and Personal 

Estate 


State Infirmary .... 


$1,558,237 65 


$253,445 99 


$1,811,683 64 


$1,811,683 64 


State Farm 


1.371,906 50 


389,898 19 


1.761,804 69 


1,761,804 69 


Norfolk State Hospital . 


289,214 o8 


72,606 20 


361,820 58 


361,820 58 


Lyman School for Boys . 


389,644 12 


98,071 12 


487,715 24 


487,715 24 


Industrial School for Boys 


211,760 S3 


61,519 72 


273,280 55 


273,280 55 


Industrial School for Girls 


354,765 16 


60,892 57 


415,657 73 


1 415,657 73 


Massachusetts Hospital School 


290,980 84 


61,560 66 


352,541 50 


! 352,541 50 


Rutland State Sanatorium 


! 524,979 12 


49,318 98 


574,298 10 


574,298 10 . 


North Reading State Sanatorium . 


j 131,998 30 


47.412 01 


179,410 31 


179,410 31 


Lake%-ille State Sanatorium 


163,912 21 


51.630 12 


215,542 33 


215,542 33 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


179.483 26 


45,617 81 


225,101 07 


225,101 07 


Penikese Hospital . . . . 


95,S3o 19 

1 


14,994 28 


110,829 47 


110,829 47 


Totals 


§5,562,717 56 


$1,206,967 65 


$6,769,685 21 


§6,769,685 21 



11. Receipts. 
Table Y. is designed to show every item of income to each 
institution from whatever source for whatever purpose, except- 
ing certain private funds, casting all together for ready com- 
parison. The tabulation also shows such of the receipts as 
under the law are available for maintenance purposes in 1916. 
According to this table the total receipts from all sources 
were $2,737,102.14. Of this amount, $2,346,570.52 was re- 
ceived from the State treasury, and the remainder, $390,531.62, 
came in on account of the institution, through boa.rd of 
patients, sale of products or otherwise. Of this latter figure, 
$346,933.93 is available for maintenance purposes in 1916. 



Part I.l GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



121 



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122 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

III. Expenditures. 

Table VI., divided into four parts, shows all expenditures 
of whatever nature on account of the several institutions. 
Part I. deals with maintenance only. Part II. exhibits out- 
lays for special purposes, divided into four headings, namely, 
"land," "buildings," "furnishings and equipment" and "mis- 
cellaneous." In Part III. are shown all moneys expended for 
purposes so far apart from the institution proper as to fall 
outside the uniform classifications. With two exceptions. 
Trustees' expenses appear in the miscellaneous column under 
"maintenance." These two exceptions are expenses for the 
Trustees of the training schools and of the Trustees in charge 
of the State sanatoria. Because of various duties these two 
Boards of Trustees have appropriations apart from the^ grants 
for their institutions. Part III., in addition to these special 
outlays, shows also the industries fund administered by the 
Trustees in charge of the State Farm. This fund is self-per- 
petuating, and, though a State outlay, is so far separate as to 
require individual treatment in the classification. Part IV. 
summarizes the whole. 

The table shows that $1,926,459.67 was spent for main- 
tenance exclusive of expenditures for special purposes men- 
tioned in Part II., which amounted to $171,098.84. By adding 
to these amounts $248,803.51 for sundry expenditures, as 
shown in Part III., we find a grand total of $2,346,362.02 
expended on account of the twelve institutions. 

In addition to the total expenditures as indicated above, two 
institutions — ■ Lyman School and the Industrial School for 
Girls — have private trust funds which are administered for 
the benefit of inmates, but independently of the State's in- 
vestment. The custody of each is vested in the State Treas- 
urer, whose duty it is to invest the same and to pay therefrom 
at the request of the Trustees. Three of those trusts — the 
Lyman fund, the Lyman Trust fund and the Lamb fund — 
apply to Lyman School, while the Fay, the Mary Lamb and 
the Rogers Book funds pertain to the Industrial School for 
Girls. From these sources a total of $1,104.62 was expended 
during the year, of which $102.26 was for books out of the 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 123 

Rogers fund, and the balance from the Lyman fund, the 
Lyman Trust and Mary Lamb funds. The major part of the 
outlay was for entertainments, drill and band equipment, 
athletic goods, lectures, prizes and similar miscellaneous items. 

IV. Analysis of Maintenance and Net Per Capita. 

The uniform analysis of maintenance expenditures com- 
prises eight classes or divisions, namely, "salaries, wages and 
labor;" "food;" "clothing and clothing materials;" "fur- 
nishings;" "heat, light and power;" "repairs and improve- 
ments;" "farm, stable and grounds;" and "miscellaneous." 
Table VII. is correspondingly divided into nine parts, with a 
summary, and shows for each of the twelve institutions the 
total cost of maintenance for each of the main headings in the 
analysis. It further shows all receipts from sales or refunds; 
the difference, which is the net cost to the institution; and the 
average net weekly per capita cost to the institution, with a 
column showing the corresponding per capita for the three- 
year period just ended. 



124 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



125 



Table VI. Part II. — Expenditures of the Several State Charitable 
Institutions for the Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1915. 





For Special Purposes 


INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Furnishing 

and 
equipping 


Miscella- 
neous 


Total 


State Infirmary .... 


- 


S8,61S 68 


- 


813,673 99 


822,292 67 


State Farm 


- 


- 


- 


5,877 72 


5,877 72 


Norfolk State Hospital 


$2,356 27 


28,406 51 


- 


14,803 34 


45,566 12 


Lyman School for Boys 


- 


65 33 


87,787 75 


- 


7,853 08 


Industrial School for Boys . 


- 


22,439 98 


1,365 17 


969 53 


24,774 68 


Industrial School for Girls . 


- 


13,338 85 


- 


5,383 62 


18,722 47 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


- 


111 07 


- 


9,769 09 


9,880 16 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


- 


446 94 


- 


3,238 62 


3,685 56 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


- 


2,066 66 


- 


1,239 80 


3,306 46 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


- 


1,429 95 


- 


9,626 85 


11,056 80 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


- 


12,235 69 


- 


4,538 79 


16,774 48 


Penikese Hospital 


- 


1,308 64 


- 


- 


1,308 64 


Totals 


82,356 27 


S90,468 30 


S9,152 92 


869,121 35 


8171,098 84 



126 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



127 



Table VI. Part IV. — Summary of Expenditures for the Fiscal Year 
ending November 30, 1915. 









Sundry 




INSTITUTIONS 


Maintenance 


Special 
Purposes 


Purposes 

apart 

from the 

Institutions 


Total 


State Infirmary 


§493,007 08 


822,292 67 


_ 


8515,299 75 


State Farm 


384,587 28 


5,877 72 


S4.604 90 


395,069 90 


Norfolk State Hospital 


131,635 38 


45,566 12 


- 


177,201 50 


LjTnan School for Boys 


123.497 98 


7,853 08 


968 88 


132,319 94 


Industrial School for Boys 


80,542 37 


24,774 68 


- 


105,317 05 


Industrial School for Girls 


82,499 53 


18,722 47 


135 74 


101,357 74 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


80,065 48 


9,880 16 


- 


89,945 64 


Rutland State Sanatorium 


192,930 84 


3,685 56 


- 


196,616 40 


North Readine; State Sanatorium 


90,666 48 


3,306 46 


- 


93,972 94 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


114,787 76 


11,056 80 


- 


125,844 56 


\\ estfield State Sanatorium 


123,289 51 


16,774 48 


- 


140,063 99 


Penikese Hospital .... 


28,949 98 


1,308 64 


- 


30,258 62 


Trustees, Massachusetts Training 










Schools 


- 


- 


65,575 71 


- 


Trustees, Massachusetts Hospitals for 










Consumptives .... 


- 


- 


177,518 28 


- 


Totals 


Sl,926,459 67 


$171,098 84 


8248,803 51 


S2,346,362 02 



Table VIL Part I. — Analysis of Expenditures for Maintenance and 
Xet Weekly Per Capita Cost of Maintenance of the Several State Chari- 
table Institutions for the Fiscal Year ending Xovemher 30, 1915. 







Salaries 


Wages axd 


Labor 






Total 


Receipts 


Net Cost 


-W-EEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 




Average 

for 
theThree 




expended 


irom 
Refunds 


to the 
Institution 


1915 












1912, 1913 












and 1914 


State Infirmary .... 


8172,783 13 


842 06 


8172,741 07 


81 273 


81 229 


State Farm 


118,898 25 


- 


118.898 25 


811 


798 


Norfolk State hospital 


47,420 20 


- 


47,420 20 


3 908 


3 262 


Lyman School for Boys 


50,761 92 


30 00 


50,731 92 


2 201 


2 266 


Industrial School for Bovs . 


32,964 04 


_ 


32,964 04 


2 587 


2 823 


Industrial School for Girls . 


36,904 05 


- 


36,904 05 


2 514 


2 234 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


34,555 27 


- 


34,555 27 


2 527 


2 412 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


70,946 00 


_ 


70,946 00 


3 898 


3 820 


North Reading State Sanatoriuin 


37,903 41 


- 


37,903 41 


3 665 


3 591 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


46,040 96 


- 


46,040 96 


3 435 


3 653 


\\estfield State Sanatorium 


50,444 13 


_ 


50,444 13 


3 737 


3 945 


Penikese Hospital 


12,837 18 


- 


12,837 18 


21 539 


11 440 


Totals 


8712,453 54 


S72 06 


8712,386 48 


- 


- 



128 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Table VII. Part II. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Food 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1915 


Average 

for 
the Three 












1912, 1913 












and 1914 


State Infirmary .... 


S157,969 67 




$157,969 67 


$1 164 


SI 080 


State Farm 


115,467 33 


S7 50 


115,459 83 


787 


702 


Norfolk State Hospital 


23,274 26 


35 77 


23,238 49 


1 915 


2 447 


Lyman School for Boys 


22,299 02 


39 10 


22,259 92 


965 


986 


Industrial School for Boys . 


lci,675 02 




13,675 02 


1 073 


1 090 


Industrial School for Girls . 


13,076 10 


- 


13,076 10 


890 


759 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


16,770 64 


- 


16,770 64 


1 226 


1 508 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


69,631 29 


1,198 65 


68,432 64 


3 760 


3 999 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


a0,871 07 


4 47 


30,866 60 


2 984 


2 931 


Lake\'ille State Sanatorium 


33,800 52 


537 57 


33,262 95 


2 481 


2 653 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


32,876 77 


698 34 


32,178 43 


2^384 


2 843 


Penikese Hospital 


3,504 88 


2 46 


3,502 42 


5 876 


4 515 


Totals 


3533,216 57 


S2,523 86 


$530,692 71 


- 


- 



Table VII. Part III. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Clothing and Clothing 


Materials 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1915 


Average 

for 

the Three 

Years 












1912, 1913 












and 1914 


State Infirmary .... 


$26,947 29 


$547 55 


$26,399 74 


$0 194 


$0 171 


State Farm 


34,857 34 


- 


34,857 34 


237 


182 


Norfolk State Hospital 


4,968 64 


8 51 


4,960 13 


408 


539 


Lyman School for Boys 


9,520 64 


8 85 


9,511 79 


412 


403 


Industrial School for Boys . 


6,054 13 


- 


6,054 13 


475 


486 


Industrial School for Girls . 


4,582 85 


1 00 


4,581 85 


312 


329 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


3,081 66 


59 51 


3,022 15 


221 


155 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


42 50 


- 


42 50 


002 


005 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


188 61 


56 09 


132 52 


012 


012 


Lakeviile State Sanatorium 


85 77 


62 80 


22 97 


001 


003 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


916 53 


21 


916 32 


067 


037 


Penikese Hospital 


656 56 


66 33 


590 23 


990 


1 342 


Totals 


891,902 52 


$810 85 


$91,091 67 


- 


■sfc - 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



129 



Table VH. Part IV 



— Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 







FURXISHIXGS 








Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


-n-EEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1915 


Average 

for 
the Three 

Years 
1912, 1913 
and 1914 


State Infirmarj' .... 

State Farm 

Norfolk State Hospital 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 
Massachusetts Hospital School . 
Rutland State Sanatorium . 
North Reading State Sanatorium 
Lakeville State Sanatorium 
Westfield State Sanatorium 
Penikese Hospital 


$17,604 17 
12,599 16 
4,179 48 
1,925 58 
2,013 04 
2,655 51 
2,257 14 
6,742 19 
2,268 32 
3,962 59 
4,071 99 
1,000 11 


$150 62 
96 35 

4 00 
4 50 

43 73 
18 62 


$17,604 17 
12,448 54 
4,083 13 
1,925 58 
2,013 04 
2,651 51 
2,252 64 
6,742 19 
2,224 59 
3,943 97 
4,071 99 
1,000 11 


; so 129 
' 084 
( 336 
t 0S3 

158 
' ISO 

164 
I 370 

215 

i 294 

; 301 

1 678 


SO 117 

084 
541 
119 
192 
177 
133 
234 
308 
407 
391 
873 


Totals 


861,279 28 


S317 82 


S60,961 46 


I 


- 



Table VH. Part V 



— Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 







HE.4.T, 


Light axd Power 






Total 


Receipts 


Net Cost 


i WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1 


Average 

for 

the Three 

Years 




expended 


from 
Sales 


to the 
Institution 


i 

1915 












1912, 1913 












and 1914 


State Infirmary .... 


833,640 16 




$33,640 16 


SO 247 


SO 390 


State Farm 


32,630 47 


_ 


32,6^0 47 


292 


265 


Norfolk State Hospital 


12,426 43 


- 


12,426 43 


1 024 


788 


Lyman School for Boys 


13,320 10 


$130 00 


13,190 10 


572 


572 


Industrial School for Boys . 


4,955 32 


— 


4,955 32 


389 


493 


Industrial School for Girls . 


8,113 89 




8,113 89 


552 


503 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


6,272 19 




6,272 19 


458 


470 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


16,&40 52 


- 


16,940 52 


930 


872 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


5,019 44 


5 00 


5,014 44 


484 


525 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


6,119 18 


28 


6,118 90 


456 


479 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


7,480 90 




7,480 90 1 


5.54 


548 


Penikese Hospital 


1,335 66 


1 60 


1,334 06 1 


2 238 


2 134 


Totals 


§148,254 26 


S136 88 


8148,117 38 


- 


- 



130 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Table YII. Part VI. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 







Repairs 


AXD Improvements 






Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


■WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1915 


Average 

for 
the Three 












1912, 1913 












and 1914 


State Infirmary .... 


S27,426 26 


$894 25 


$26,532 01 


$0 195 


$0 218 


State Farm 


11,129 90 


36 22 


11,093 68 


075 


122 


Norfolk State Hospital 


12,878 05 


24 74 


12,853 31 


1 059 


1 008 


Lyman School for Boys 


4,314 10 


46 66 


4,267 44 


185 


277 


Industrial School for Boys . 


2,638 49 


- 


2,638 49 


207 


260 


Industrial School for Girls . 


3,160 38 


_ 


3,160 38 


215 


171 


^Massachusetts Hospital School . 


2,259 56 


3 85 


2,255 71 


164 


158 


Rutland State Sanatormm . 


4,022 90 


21 25 


4,001 65 


219 


242 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


3,791 17 


8 29 


3,782 88 


365 


441 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


6,335 07 


5 60 


6,329 47 


472 


430 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


6,974 33 


- 


6,974 33 


516 


641 


Penikese Hospital 


3,040 00 


- 


3,040 00 


5 100 


2 213 


Totals 


887,970 21 


Sl,040 86 


886,929 35 


- 


- 



Table YII. Part VII. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Farm, Stable and Grounds 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1915 


Average 

for 

the Three 

Years 












1912, 1913 












and 1914 


State Infirmary .... 


820,172 66 


S161 83 


820,010 83 


80 147 


80 130 


State Farm 


30,164 90 


5,175 65 


24,989 25 


170 


165 


Norfolk State Hospital 


12,380 54 


561 97 


11,818 57 


974 


1 426 


Lvman School for Boys 


9,411 82 


1,075 20 


8,336 62 


361 


389 


Industrial School for Boys . 


10,077 35 


97 55 


9,979 80 


783 


760 


Industrial School for Girls . 


7.635 57 


184 22 


7,451 35 


507 


482 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


6,566 55 


146 78 


6,419 77 


469 


272 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


11,463 77 


1,047 89 


10,415 88 


572 


349 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


4,043 35 


496 43 


3,546 92 


342 


353 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


10,226 77 


803 78 


9,422 99 


703 


604 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


10,866 99 


858 51 


10,008 48 


741 


625 


Penikese Hospital 


2,114 52 


99 80 


2,014 72 


3 380 


1 955 


Totals 


$135,124 79 


810,709 61 


8124,415 18 


- 


- 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



131 



Table VII. Part VIII . — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 



INSTITUTIONS 



State Infirmary . 
State Farm . 
Norfolk State Hospital 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Rutland State Sanatorium . 
North Reading State Sanatorium 
Lakeville State Sanatorium 
Westfield State Sanatorium 
Penikese Hospital 



Totals 



Religious Services 



Total 
expended 



Sl,873 15 

1,574 00 

880 83 

1,466 13 

920 00 

1,250 00 

1,555 00 

1,358 27 

1,376 00 

1,194 00 

1,247 40 

10 00 



$14,704 78 



Receipts 



Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 



Sl,873 15 
1,574 00 

880 83 
1,466 13 

920 00 
1,250 00 
1.555 00 
1,358 27 
1,376 00 
1,194 00 
1,247 40 
10 00 



$14,704 78 



WEEKLY PER CAPITA 



1915 



$0 013 
010 
072 
063 
072 
085 
113 
074 
133 
089 
092 
016 



Average 

for 
the Three 

Years 
1912, 1913 
and 1914 



Table VII. Part IX. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Miscellaneous 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


weekly per capita 


INSTITUTIONS 


1915 


Average 

for 
the Three 












1912, 1913 












and 1914 


State Infirmary .... 


$34,590 59 


$287 87 


$34,302 72 


$0 252 


$0 274 


State Farm .... 


27,265 93 


2,514 92 


24,751 01 


168 


202 


Norfolk State Hospital 


13,226 95 


91 


13,226 04 


1 090 


970 


Lyman School for Boys 


10,478 67 


- 


10,478 67 


454 


617 


Industrial School for Bovs . 


7,244 98 


18 48 


7,226 50 


567 


798 


Industrial School for Girls . 


5,121 18 




5,121 18 


348 


393 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


6,747 47 


- 


6,747 47 


493 


563 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


11,783 40 


345 54 


11,437 86 


628 


743 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


5,205 11 


145 10 


5,060 01 


489 


631 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


7,022 90 


6 53 


7,016 37 


523 


605 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


8,410 47 


39 40 


8,371 07 


620 


697 


Penikese Hospital 


4,451 07 


38 85 


4,412 22 


7 403 


5 107 


Totals 


$141,548 72 


$3,397 60 


$138,151 12 


- 


- 



132 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 133 



V. COMPAKISON OF APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 

THEREFROM. 

Table VIII. affords comparison of appropriations for main- 
tenance with the respective amounts expended therefrom. 
Appropriations are classified as "receipts available for main- 
tenance" and "appropriations in addition to such receipts.'* 
All receipts at the four sanatoria, the Hospital School and 
the Norfolk State Hospital, though turned, like receipts of all 
the other institutions, into the State treasury, are by law ap- 
plicable to maintenance in the succeeding year. Receipts at 
the remaining institutions are not so applied. By this com- 
parison the total maintenance expenditures were $4,967.29 
less than the amounts appropriated. This balance reverts 
into the treasury. 

Receipts of 1914 available for maintenance in 1915 totaled 
$158,402.54. This sum was received largely on account of 
board of patients at the State sanatoria and the Hospital 
School. 



134 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 135 



VI. Appropriations for Special Purposes. 
The total of appropriations for special purposes during 1915 
as shown by Table IX. was $272,228.16. In addition to this 
amount the several institutions began the year with a total of 
$88,126.05 unexpended balance on previous special appropria- 
tions. The grand total available for 1915 was, therefore, 
$360,354.21. The amount expended from this total was 
$171,098.84, leaving an unexpended balance of $189,255.37, 
of which $186,604.07 will be available in 1916. The small 
remainder of $2,651.30 reverts to the State treasury. 



136 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 






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H 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 137 



VII. Net Cost to the Commonwealth. 
The net cost to the State of maintaining or conducting each 
institution is the difference between total expenditure and the 
total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury. 
This total outlay must cover all moneys spent for maintenance 
and special purposes, together with all expenditures for sundry 
purposes apart from the institution, and interest on outstanding 
bonds. These items are compared in Table X. For conven- 
ience, the daily average number of inmates and the net weekly 
per capita cost to the State are added. This tabulation shows 
a daily average number of inmates of 7,949.51, and expendi- 
tures for all purposes of $2,419,577.17. Total receipts from 
institutions, i.e., sources other than the State treasury, 
amounted to $390,531.62. The net cost to the State for all 
twelve institutions amounted to $2,029,045.55, making the net 
weekly per capita cost to the State $4,895. 



138 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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H 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 139 



VIII. Analysis of Pay Roll. 
Table XL, divided into six parts, shows a comparative 
analysis of the pay roll for each of the twelve institutions. 
The first five parts divide service into five classes, namely, 
"general administration," "medical service," "ward service," 
"repairs and improvements," and "farm, stable and grounds." 
Part six summarizes the whole. The table also shows the full 
roster, that is, the number of employees deemed necessary to 
carry on the institution efiiciently, and in opposite columns 
the daily average number employed in 1914 and 1915, with 
the same average for the three-year period ending November 
30, 1914. The same treatment is given the average monthly 
compensation and the weekly per capita cost. Thus it appears 
that the full roster for all the institutions together was 1,452. 
The total average number employed was 1,394.05, while for 
the three-year period preceding 1915 it was 1,243.095. The 
total average monthly compensation paid was $561.15 as 
against $533.59 in the preceding three-year period. Miscel- 
laneous and incidental employment not entered upon the pay 
rolls of the institutions does not appear in this tabulation. 
The number of inmates to one employee remains about as 
before. 



140 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 






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»o 


OO 


,_, 


CM 


00 


co 




•< 


»>4 


»o 


lo 


«o 


CO 


CO 


IV 




CM 


CO 


•>*< 


■<»< 


•&> 




^ 






©& 


























■< 






























e«> 




































esT 




























fA 




For the 

Three 

Years 191 

1913 
and 1914 


CO 


00 


o 


_ 1 


«-4 


IV 


_l 


00 


o 


C<1 


Oi 


00 


,_, 


O 





"5 




CO 


§ 


CO 


s 


?;; 


o 


<M 




o 


g 


g 




o6 


CO 


CO 


yti 


t>l 


CO 


r>I 


CO 


CO 


d 


CO 


CM 


(^ 




t^ 


U5 










<M 


TK 


CO 




CO 




" 




» 






























































pq 




05 


■^ 


_i 


<M 


t^ 


00 


00 


i 


^H 


(M 


CO 


o 


CO 




^ 


o 


o 


cq 


s 


s 


s 


s 


^ 


^ 


o 


§ 


^ 




S» 


CO 


r^ 


■<l< 


»o 


CO 


CO 


00 


t>l 


d 


T)< 


^ 


CO 


^ 






IV 


»o 


CM 








(M 




CO 




■<}< 




o 




t) 




























r}< 




;?; 






























































































■< 




■r.^ 


00 


U5 


I 


s 


1/5 


(M 


CO 


p 


_( 


'^ 


CO 


C5 




K 




d 










(M 




IV 


CO 










> 


s 
s 


CO 


»o 


OO 


00 


CO 


d 


OO 


Tj< 


<M 

CO 


CD 


CO 


d 




<! 


OO 


«o 


CO 








CO 




Tf< 








































ib 






^ 


CO 


lO 


Oi 


CO 


00 


^ 




e<i 


C3> 


o 


CO 


OO 












CO 


TtH 








CO 


00 


00 




CS 


■^ 


o 






1 


t^ 




«o 


o 


•«*i 


OO 






<M 


eo 


IV 


o 


s 






CO 


t^ 


iC 


CO 


Cft 


CO 


CO 


^ 


^ 


OO 


t^ 


eo 


OO 








00 


»o 


"5 










CO 




■^ 


■>n 




CO 
































>o 






































t^ 






































• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


s 


• 












2; 














g 




3 














o 


>> 




1 

1 




3 


5 

«2 

i 
eg 

3 


3 

1 

3 


1 

s 

m 


1 

-^ 

OQ 
M 

a 

1 

1 


s 

.2 

a 


s 

3 

1 

3 


"3 
i 


O 








1 


1 


1 


c3 


1 




1 


1 


OJ 

^ 

J 


13 

1 


1 


H 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



141 







S m ^ 
































^S S'l' 


_, 


(^ 


oo 


00 


CO 


<M 


2 


CO 


■* 


CO 


■^ 


o 








erage 
eThr 
Years 
12, 19 

Qdl9] 


-*< 


o 






^ 


o 




o 




CO 


CO 






1 


s 


o 
















CO 


CO 


' 






>si o» s 
































^*- -^ =« 


























































" 
































a< 




O 


CD 


CO 


§ 


rt" 


CO 


,H 


§ 


CO 


_l 


oo 


-* 






•"J 




-*> 






■cf 


-* 


CO 


00 


00 




CO 






o 






o 


lO 


o 


o 






CO 


CO 




CO 


-* 






(S 


o 






















CO 






a 




^ 




























cu 
































>; 
































J 
































u$ 
































H 




05 


e^ 


oo 








t^ 








CO 


■»*< 










lO 


o 


m 






CO 


CO 






o 




OS 










o 




o 


o 


c^ 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 








o 






















•* 


' 






T^ 


4^ 






























ci^ 
































<u ^ •* 


M 




o 


•* 




o 




M< 






tN. 
















s. 








s 




CO 


OS 








;^ 


5 


cq 


CO 


CSI 


""• 


'"' 


CO 


CO 


lO 


oo 


CO 


oo 


CO 




1 






oo 


CO 


cq 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CD 


o 


CD 


CO 


OS 




§ 


o 




lO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o» 




o 


oo 


o 




































l« 


in 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 


t2 


CO 


^ 


CO 


lO 


o 


CO 


a 




l« 


t>- 


i 


CO 








oo 






CO 


CO 


s 


^ 


tr^ 


a> 


CO 


CD 


55 


00 


»o 


05 


*^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


H 


fe 5 


o> 


•^ 




s 


oo 








»o 


OS 




OS 


00 




h 




§ 


- 


lO 


"* 


CO 


T»< 


CO 


t^ 


o 


00 


g 


5 


CQ 


a 




























6% 


^ 


C5 






























< 


^ 




Q 


a 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


05 


o 


Q 


.,_, 


Q 


1—1 


o 










CO 




CO 




lO 














& 


i 


■* 


■* 


oo 




CO 




CO 


CO 


l~- 


«5 


»o 


CO 


■o 


> 


t^ 


,_i 


o 


oo 


CO 


CO 


00 


CD 


^ 


CO 


>« 


00 


S3 


^ 


■< 




^ 


^ 


C<1 


. "5 


CO 


>o 


o 


t- 




o 


s 


s 
































s% 




































M __ 
































fa ^ ^ 




o 




«5 




CO 


o 


CD 


t- 


OS 


•* 










For th. 

Three 

Years 19 

1913 
and 191 




•^ 


Oi 


1-H 




ira 


o 


«5 


lO 






OS 


CO 






oo 


o 




CD 


o 


CO 








"—1 


lO 


CO 


CO 




^ 


t>» 


'^ 


(m' 


^ 


CO 


CO 


d 


CO 


CO 


CO 




-* 




s 
































S 
































« 




•«H 


OS 


,_l 


§ 


o 


o 


t^ 


t- 


CO 


_l 


CO 


1-5 


-^ 






^ 


05 


t^ 




§ 


CO 


■^ 




o 










pq 
S 

!2; 


1 


•tl 




o 


o 


o> 


o 


OS 


OS 


r^ 


o 


cq 




lO 


d 


CsJ 


e<« 


'-* 


CO 


CO 


d 


CO 


'-' 


CO 


"-^ 


^ 


































u 
































o 
































•<! 




^H 


cq 


o 


o 


o 


^ 


-* 


OT 


^H 


§ 


_l 


Q 


CO 








CO 












CO 




OS 


t^ 


§ 






a 


s 


o 


oo 


o 


o 


o 


t^ 




^ 


OS 


o 


CO 


UO 




> 


ai 


00 


d 


CO 


c<i 


M 


■<1< 


CO 


-^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


^ 


CO 




< 


w 


i-H 
























lO 






^^ 


































































t^ 


CO 




o 


cq 


IC 


s 




CD 




CO 


oo 


o 








CO 


fO 


CO 


^ 


lO 


lO 








lO 




^ 






f§ 


05 


CJ 


CO 


00 


o 


CO 


CO 


CD 


00 


OS 


C<l 


o 






od 


d 


-* 


^ 


c^ 


d 


CO 


-^ 


CO 


^ 


CO 


^ 


•^ 






-H 


























iS 






3 
































t^ 






































• 












a 


• 


• 


• 








CQ 














^^ 




_3 














o 






• 




03 


i2 


tf 


a 

03 

1 

J/J 


1 


a 


a 


• 










>> 


a 


1 


1 

1 


>> 
hi 

.2 

1 


o 

1 




1 
1 

.9 


3 

1 

1 


3 

1 

1 
1 


3 










a 








1 


1 


rg 


1 


rt 


^ 


2 


s 


1 








1 


1 


1 
i 


c3 

6 


3 


a 


1 


J 

3 

« 


5 
:5 






1 



142 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 









X 

w 

< 
Eh 







Average for 
the Three 

Years 
1912, 1913 
and 1914 


OS 


i 


CO 


«^ 


CO 


<M 


^ 


00 


to 


<M 


I 


CO 






% 


^ 
g 


o 




o 


1^ 


§8 


«o 


g 


s 


o 


1 


































< 
































































o 


•>* 


CO 


^ 


00 


■* 


05 


t^ 


00 


OO 


^^ 


s 










<M 


t^ 




CO 


m 




CO 


CO 










O 


Jh 


«5 


eo 


■* 


'«< 




c^ 


OO 


ICi 


t- 


"9 


t^ 


o 






w 


0t 


o 






1-1 
















CO 






u 




«» 




























PU 
































tH 






























































w 
































H 




o 








CO 




-<J< 


•^ 


CO 


OO 


o 


«o 










<M 










t^ 




CO 


CO 


o 








l« 


lO 


CO 


»c 


CO 


o 


(M 


00 


lO 


t>- 


»o 


t^ 


CO 






s 


8 






























M 
































For the 

Three 

Years 191 

1913 

and 1914 


t^ 


OO 


CO 


s 






CO 


CO 


!>. 






o 


(>- 






<M 




CO 


o 


o 


^ 


05 


CO 




r- 


o 


03 




Hi 

o 


to 


o 

CO 


tfi 


m 




C>5 

CO 


00 


CO 
CO 




o 


lO 

05 


t^ 


CO 

o 




«« 


CO 


CO 


r)H 


53 


CO 


(M 


<M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


o 




o 





































00 




^ 


00 


M< 


lO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


^ 






■^ 








lO 


■<*< 




<M 








00 






^ 


CO 


"S 






00 






Tj< 






CO 


00 




> 


































o> 


t* 


CO 


CO 


■ct< 


a> 


r^ 


o 


•<*< 




o 


o 


t^ 


t^ 


tH 


u 


CO 


CO 


'*< 




CO 


(M 


C^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


U5 


CO 




O 


























































Q 


:5 




c^ 


CO 


00 


CO 


<rfl 


CO 


(^ 


t~ 


ts_ 


(^ 


CO 


00 




■< 


« 




TJ< 


t;^ 


•^ 




CO 


t^ 




Tt< 


CO 


CO 


o> 


CO 




> 




05 
CO 


OS 


o 




CO 

o 


CO 


M 


Tf 


CO 






.•o 


"< 


s 


IM 


CO 


-* 


TH 


T*( 


CO 


CO 


(N 


CO 


CO 


CO 


lO 


CO 








«« 
























^ 





































esT 
































For the 

Three 

Years 191 

1913 
and 1914 


«o 


<M 


lO 


00 




■* 


CO 








CO 


>o 


OS 









t- 


OO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


-* 






00 


CO 








'^ 


C<I 




CO 


CO 


CO 


«5 


*~: 


e^ 


CO 


>o 


s 


o 




*H 




tfi 


■^ 


CD 


CNI 








2 


OO 






CO 




00 


Oi 




"3 


(M 


■* 


CO 


CO 






CO 




s 




P4 



































































(M 


t- 


CO 


C<l 


•* 


IC 


»o 


CT> 


o 


CO 


CO 


o 


o 






CO 


co 


CO 


-* 


r^ 






O 


o 


lO 




Ol 




i 


00 


CO 




03 




t^ 


CO 






«5 


CO 


C<I 


o 




■^ 


ai 


00 


s 


i-^ 


CO 


CO 


»o 


d 


d 


W5 


CO 


CO 




T-C 




05 




(M 


■^ 


CO 


CO 


c^ 




CO 






































;<; 
































o 




























































< 




a> 


<M 


05 


_ 


<M 


J^ 


t^ 


03 


00 


IC 


05 


CO 


^^ 






^ 


OO 


00 


OO 


00 


CO 


l^ 


'^ 


o> 


o> 


00 


Tj* 


o 




» 


kA 


o 


«-- 




CD 




o 


05 


o> 


CO 


o 


OO 






•< 


s; 


CO 






OO 


CO 


c-i 




»o 


cd 


d 


OO 


CO 


OO 




in 




o 




lO 


(M 


•«*< 


CO 


CO 


c^ 


<M 


CO 




o> 








?3 
























VO 






(i 

































4) 
































^ 


t^ 










CO 






r- 






CO 


CO 








OO 


CO 




-* 


CO 


C3i 






o 




o 


-«f 


-* 






^ 


O 


05 


o 


I^ 


-* 


o 


00 


CO 


-* 


-* 




CO 






^ 


CO 


CO 


Tti 


OO 


OO 


CO 


CO 


d 


d 


00 


Ttl 


d 








c^ 


O 


c^ 


lO 


(M 


-* 


CO 


CO 




CO 


CO 




CO 






3 


CO 
























CO 








































• 


• 


• 










a 






• 








m 














1 




_2 














^' 






, 


. 


, 


. 




o 














o 






1 




OJ 

1 




1 

13 


s 

.2 




.2 
o 


a 

.2 
o 










1 


>, 




i2 


1 


1 


1 




CO 

0) 


(0 


3 










S 


g 


1 


1 


1 


j3 


1 


<a 

1 


_C 


1 


OT 








C3 


1 




3 


is 


3 


^ 




2 


i 


3 
e2 








i 


1 

02 


1 

o 


c3 

1 


1 

a 




1 


P5 


1 


to 

1 


"3 



Part I. 



GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



143 







^2 2^. 
































lo 


c^ 


,_i 


_l 


CO 


IN 


•>*< 


■<*< 


(M 


^H 


1^ 


s 








Average 

the Thn 

Years 

1912, 19: 

and 191 


o 




t^ 


oo 


lO 


CO 






CO 


CM 


CO 








H 


i 


"^ 


00 


o 


■<1< 


o 






<M 


CM 


CM 


o 


1 


































■< 






























H 
































































C4 
-< 




»o 








00 


CO 


o 




O 


C5 


O 






















CO 


>* 




.CO 










o 


35 


'^ 


o 


CO 


■=> 


-* 


o 




CO 


C^ 




CO 


1 


1 




Pi 


9> 


o 




























u 




^ 




























cu 






























































































>i 
































§ 

^ 






'i* 


lO 


o 


o 


■^ 


CSl 


CO 




CO 


00 












M 






CO 


C5 


CO 


o 


05 




t^ 








lA 




O 


•* 


o 


■^ 


o 


















W 






























s 


s 






























For the 

Three 

Years 1912, 

1913 

and 1914 


^ 


oo 


s 


^ 


-H 


J* 


g 


^ 


S5 


s 


•* 


S 


s 




Iz; 


>o 


oo 


00 


oo 


00 


c^ 


CO 


o 


■«*< 




5 


"^ 


^ 




1 


00 


M 


c^ 


CO 


CO 


o 


r^ 


o 


lO 


00 


o 


iO 


o 


« 


^ 


«o 




00 


00 




iO 


CO 


lO 


CO 


00 








h 




























































05 


o 


o 


05 


^ 


_c 


C-5 


■^ 


_l 


00 


00 




CM 














00 


CO 






lo 








a 


^ 




CO 


M 






c^ 


•^ 




oo 


IC 


CO 






1 




-* 


o 


lO 


CO 


o 


o 


00 


lO 


05 


o 


CO 


1 


CM 


o < 


»H 


g 


«3 




00 


00 


iO 


CD 


t^ 


o 


CO 


05 




S 


0. 




























^ 


S 


a 






























*"* 


o 






























Q 


■< 




,_, 


00 


CO 


»c 


CO 


(^ 


•* 


•<*< 


(^ 


,_, 


05 




CM 


z 






■<»< 










t- 




t^ 


00 


o 








< 


H 


in 


CO 


t^ 


oo 


o 


o 


lO 


c^ 


o 


C<l 


00 


CO 




CM 


£ 


^ 


<M 


-^ 


00 


t^ 


o 


o 


,_, 


C5 


CO 


•>*l 


CM 


1 


(^ 




05 


05 


■<1< 


00 


o 


■»J< 


CO 


00 


»o 


CO 


CO 




S 


< 






























^ 


b 






































c«f „ 
































M r< ■^ 


o 






05 


o 




o 


o 


«5 


CO 


■* 




CO 






For th( 

Three 

Years 19 

1913 

and 191 








t^ 






CO 


CO 




CM 






CO 






" 


^ 


CO 


CO 


lO 


=p 


o 




CO 




oo 


"=; 


CM 




oi 


•* 


CD 




-* 






■<J< 


CO 


CM 


CM 




CO 




s 




























































H 
































ti 




CO 


CO 


00 










■^ 










^ 






t^ 


o 


o 


oo 


CO 


o 


"* 


?l 






OO 




o 




S 


tH 


00 


o 


t^ 


o 




o 


IC 


o 






»o 




oo 




n 


s 


Cq 




00 


Cvj 


■^ 




c^ 


t>l 


CO 


CM 


CO 


1 
































»o 




;3 
































Z 
































a 




























































c 
































<j 




00 






CO 




o 


t^ 




■* 




o 








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144 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 







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Part LI GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



145 



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i 



146 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1 



THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

In compliance with the provisions of chapter 46. section 2, 
of the Revised Laws,^ the Board's officers have visited each of 
the five county training schools and submit the following 
report. The schools are : — 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence. 
Hampden County Training School, Springfield. 
Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford. 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School, Wal- 
pole. 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston). 

Each school has been inspected. The accompanying table 
shows the numbers and movement of population in these five 
schools during the fiscal year ending November 30, 1915, and 
also the average weekly per capita cost of maintenance of 
each institution during that time. 

As will be seen from the table, there were 572 children in 
the five schools during 1915. The year opened with 381 boys. 
During the succeeding twelve months 190 boys and 1 girl were 
admitted and 186 boys were discharged or paroled, leaving 
386 on November 30, 1915,^ when the year closed. 

The average age at time of admission was eleven years and 
eleven months. The law raising the school age to sixteen 
years, which went into effect in September, 1913, and affects 
almost without qualification the class from which these chil- 
dren are drawn, has not tended to increase the number of 
committals of older boys. The average weekly per capita cost 
of maintaining the schools was S4.71, as compared with $4.31 
last year. 

1 " County truant schools shall be subject to visitation by the board of education and by the 
state board of charity and said boards shall report thereon annually to the general court." 

2 See Table I. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



147 






O 



Average 
Weekly 
Per Cap- 
ita Cost 
of main- 
taining 
Schools 


$5 44 

3 07 
5 77 

4 33 
4 94 


Z 




1 

go 
> 

< 














2 years, 13 days 

3 years 

1 years, 6 months 
1 years, 11 months 
1 years, 2 months 


c 










Number 

re- 
maining 
Novem- 
ber 30, 
1915 


'<*' CO -^ to o 
CO CO -H TH t^ 


to 


Number 
released 

or dis- 
charged 

during 
Year 


^ ^ ig 2 S 


s 


Number 

ad- 
mitted 
during 
Year 


-H O C^ C5 CO 

T»< eq t- ^ CO 


S 


IP 


1 ^ 1 ^ s 


s 


Average 
Number 

in 
School 
during 
Year 


§ ^ 2 ^ g 


i 


Whole 
Number 

in 
School 
during 
Year 


g g ^ s g 


s 


a 
a 

s 
1 










W. Grant Fancher 
Charles E. Butler 
Rufus E. Corlew . 
James H. Craig . 
Stephen P. Streeter 


o 

1 


Essex County Training School 

Hampden County Training School 

Middlesex County Training School 

Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth 

Union Training School. 
Worcester County Training School 


1 





148 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

The Essex and ^Middlesex schools require a medical exam- 
ination of all new boys, and the Worcester school. has recently 
inaugurated such a plan. The Norfolk school summons a 
physician when an examination is considered necessary by the 
superintendent. The ]Middlesex school has regular medical 
inspection of all the boys about once in six months. 

The teeth of boys in the Essex and Middlesex schools are 
cared for by dentists who visit the institutions regularly once 
a week. This work has been begun by the ^Yorcester school. 
In Norfolk and Hampden there is no systematic dental work. 
The physical condition of a majority of the boys at the time 
of committal is undoubtedly poor in all five schools. Many 
have used tobacco in some form, and are plainly suffer- 
ing from the results of underfeeding and bad habits. The 
need of systematic medical and dental attention is therefore 
great. 

Two schools, the Essex and [Middlesex, have separated the 
younger from the older boys, the former having 2 and the 
latter 3 cottage groups. As the boys vary in age from seven to 
sixteen years, and include the young child whose committal is 
largely due to poverty or neglect, as well as the adolescent 
boy who may • have been in court many times on criminal 
charges, the necessity of careful classification is apparent. 

An important need in the care of these children is nourishing 
food. The dietary of the five schools varies greatly, from the 
abundant and appetizing fare provided in the Essex to the less 
satisfactory menu of the Hampden school. The manner of 
service also varies. In the schools which have small groups at 
the tables, and provide clean white tablecloths and napkins, 
an opportunity is presented to teach the boys good manners 
and to inculcate habits of neatness. 

The schools lack facilities for physical training, since they 
have no gymnasium equipment and no physical directors. 
The opportunities for indoor play in the Hampden and Norfolk 
schools are not good, as there is no suitable space for rough 
games. The Hampden institution is to have a new building 
in the near future, so that this lack may be remedied. 

The superintendent in this last-named school has brought 
about a number of changes in the direction of more recreation. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 149 

which have had a marked effect upon the boys. They were 
taken to the Springfield Boys' Club two afternoons each week 
during the winter, and to the theatre a number of times in 
the summer. All were given a day's outing and picnic with 
money to spend as they chose. The excellent teacher recently 
engaged has shown himself a leader in the boys' games, and 
takes an interest in their physical condition as well as in their 
progress in the classroom. 

In the Essex, Middlesex and Worcester schools the boys get 
practical carpentry and repair work. Those in the first-named 
institution also have printing, and make and repair all their 
shoes. The Middlesex boys repair their shoes; a few of the 
older boys are taught typewriting, w^hile the younger children 
have cane seating of chairs and basketry. In the Hampden 
and Norfolk schools there is neither mariual nor industrial 
training. The former institutxon has lately introduced drawing 
and drafting into its curriculum. These two schools have 
all-day sessions, while the three others hold one session. All 
the boys have allotted to them various chores in and outside 
the house. There is little tendency to rotate the boys, but 
the policy is usually followed of holding them more or less to 
tasks which they have learned to do well, in order to keep the 
machinery of the institution in good running order. 

Boys under sixteen are paroled from the Essex, Norfolk and 
Worcester schools by the county commissioners when the 
superintendents of the aforesaid institutions, in their discre- 
tion, so recommend. Good marks in these institutions bring in- 
creased privileges. In the Hampden and the Middlesex schools 
boys are paroled automatically, when they acquire 4,000 and 
6,000 merits, respectively. This system usually requires a stay 
of about a year in the Hampden and a year and a half in the 
Middlesex school, and the kind of home which awaits the boy 
on his release becomes a minor consideration. The plan seems 
inelastic in dealing with children who are in many instances 
the victims of bad home conditions. 

The Middlesex school employ's a full-time parole officer to 
visit its paroled boys and return them to the school in case 
they fall into evil ways. With this exception the parole sys- 
tem in these schools is weak. In many cases boys are com- 



150 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

mitted from bad homes to the training schools, and later are 
returned to the conditions which were the chief cause of their 
delinquency. 

The superintendents, so far as their limited time permits, 
are making an effort to keep in touch with paroled boys. For 
this part of the work, however, the county commissioners are 
responsible, and with the single exception of Middlesex they 
are not exercising to a sufficient extent the oversight required 
of them in their administration of the parole system. 

An examination of the somewhat meager history records 
leads one to believe that more careful case work in the courts 
by competent officers would disclose many instances of neglect 
or dependency, especially among the younger children. In 
such case, aid and oversight in the family, or the placement of 
the child in another home, is more appropriate treatment than 
commitment as a school offender. Good case work in the courts 
would also prevent the commitment to these institutions in 
appreciable numbers of feeble-minded children, who are thus 
deprived of the special care required by their condition. Thor- 
ough investigation and a strengthening of the probation system 
all over the Commonwealth w^ould undoubtedly bring good 
results in dealing with many boys for whom the training schools 
seem at present the only appropriate place. 

In this connection an extract from the last report of the 
superintendent of the Middlesex County Training School is 
worthy of consideration. Referring to the small number of 
commitments during the past year, he states: — 

Such a condition of affairs indicates one of two things: either 
that the present method of handling truancy by commitment to 
county training schools is not the right way and^is not so con- 
sidered by the public at large, nor by the public school author- 
ities, or if it is the right plan there is a gross lack of enforce- 
ment of the requirements in such cases. It is not good sense 
to continue a system and its attendant expense if there is no 
use for it. County training schools are one of the ramifications 
of the public school system of the State. It would be perfectly 
proper, therefore, to refer this entire question to the State Board 
of Education, and ask them, in consultation with those inter- 
ested in this work, to determine the true solution. Some com- 
munities believe that this problem can be better handled locally 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 151 

by methods which can be applied in their own school system. 
Witness the Cambridge plan and the recent abolition of the 
parental school at West Roxbury. Cambridge has so success- 
fully solved the question that for three and one-half years not 
one boy has been brought before the local court on the charge of 
truancy. In Boston Mr. Minard, the former superintendent of 
the parental school, and now supervisor for the city of Boston 
of boys who are guilty of school offences, is quoted as in favor 
of handling such cases without commitment to an institution. 
He has had experience with both methods, and his conclusions 
should have weight. If commitment is no longer necessary, 
county training schools should no longer exist. They should be 
turned over to some other use, such as the care of the feeble- 
minded, or juvenile delinquents found guilty under the juvenile 
delinquent law. An arrangement of this sort might help to 
relieve the congestion now experienced in institutions designed 
for the care of children of this type who are rapidly increasing 
in numbers. 



The truth about the status of these institutions is that in 
theory they are just what the superintendent, above quoted, 
has called them, — a ramification of the public school system, 
while in fact they are places of confinement for delinquents. 
It is surely a reasonable view of child conduct to say that 
truancy is the occasion rather than the cause of the child's 
wrongdoing. Any intelligent classification of the 572 children 
who were confined in these five schools during 1915 will show 
that a large proportion are markedly mentally defective; that 
a great many of them have long records for offences much 
graver than truancy; that almost all of them come out of 
home and family conditions so bad that the child's conduct is 
hardly a discredit under the circumstances, — home conditions, 
at all events, which the process of commitment for staying 
away from school has no power to remedy. Schooling is highly 
advisable for such a lad, but his paramount need is for enough 
parental care to constitute a chance. Any system which would 
meet his needs adequately, therefore, must first of all pro- 
vide intelligent classification before commitment. This would 
eliminate the feeble-minded. In the second place, it should 
reach his parents or those responsible for him. Third, having 
determined his mental condition to be normal, and having 



152 STATE BOARD OF CH.ARITY. [P. D. 17. 

joined his parents as parties to the process, it must seek out 
the real cause of his delinquency and deal with it frankly and 
adequately with a view to cure. The convenient subterfuge 
of the present statutes, stating the condition of truancy to be 
a cause for which a child shall be deprived of his liberty, should 
be done away with, and the future position of the county train- 
ing school in the economy of Massachusetts should be deter- 
mined only after a thoroughgoing attempt to bring the proba- 
tion system to a higher state of effectiveness. That the actual 
accomplishments of the five schools are not more meager is 
due to the courageous efforts of the superintendents who 
struggle for betterment in the face of such an inconsistent 
system. 

In this view of the situation it should become a serious 
question for Hampden County whether, at the point of out- 
growing their present school, they will invest large sums in a 
new plant to further the original purpose without first taking 
stock of the larger possibilities of probation, holding the State 
training schools as a last resort for incorrigibles. If Boston 
and Cambridge can, through probationary oversight, reach the 
delinquencies to which truancy is the clue, and do it better 
than by the old truant school method, it would seem that 
Springfield can do the same. 

SUPERVI5I0X OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR SUP- 
PORTED BY CITIES AND TOT\'XS. 

The City .vxd Towx Paupers. 
The law provides that the State Board of Charity may visit 
and inspect all places where city or town poor are supported in 
families, and requires the Board to visit, at least once a year, 
not only all children who are maintained by the Common- 
wealth, but all minor children who are supported at the expense 
of any city or town. Children illegally retained in city or town 
almshouses — i.e., pauper children over two years of age, or, if 
the mothers are inmates, over three years of age, and not defec- 
tive in body or mind, who have been retained in an almshouse 
for more than two months — must be removed therefrom and 
placed at board at the expense of the city or town concerned 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 153 

(Revised Laws, chapter 81, sections 3-7, 43; Acts of 1905, 
chapters 285, 303; Acts of 1913, chapter 112). 

The following data show numbers and location of the various 
classes of persons coming within the scope of this statute : — 

The Settled Adult Poor provided for in Families. 
Of the 379 adult poor persons reported by the local authori- 
ties as fully supported in families on January 1, 1915, 8 were 
unknown, 38 had died and 29 had been removed before visits 
could be made. The remaining 304 — 134 men and 170 women 
— were all visited and reported on by the Board's agents. 
They were supported by 133 cities and towns, as follows: 
Abington, 7; Acushnet, 1; Agawam, 1; Ashland, 3; Athol, 3; 
Avon, 3; Ayer, 2; Becket, 1; Berkley, 1; Berlin, 1; Bernards- 
ton, 2; Blandford, 1; Bolton, 1; Bourne, 1; Boxford, 1; 
Boylston, 1; Brewster, 4; BrookHne, 1; Charlemont, 3; Charl- 
ton, 1; Chatham, 3; Chelsea, 9; Cheshire, 5; Chilmark, 1; 
Clarksburg, 3; Clinton, 1; Cohasset, 1; Colrain, 2; Cum- 
mington, 1; Dalton, 5; Danvers, 7; Dedham, 3; Dighton, 3; 
Dover, 1; Dracut, 2; Dudley, 2; Duxbury, 1; Edgartown, 3; 
Enfield, 1; Erving, 2; Everett, 7; Fitchburg, 1; Freetown, 1; 
Great Barrington, 6; Greenfield, 2; Groveland, 1; Hamilton, 
2; Harwich, 2; Hatfield, 2; Heath, 1; Hinsdale, 3; Holbrook, 
8; Hopedale, 1; Hull, 1; Ipswich, 4; Kingston, 1; Lakeville, 
3; Lee, 4; Lenox, 1; Leominster, 1; Leyden, 1; Ludlow, 3; 
Marion, 4; Medfield, 1; Melrose, 3; Mendon, 3; Merrimac, 7; 
Milford, 2; Millbury, 1; Milton, 2; Montague, 1; Monterey, 
1; Montgomery, 1; Needham, 5; New Salem, 2; Newton, 4; 
Norfolk, 1; Northborough, 1; Northfield, 1; Norwood, 3; 
Oak Bluffs, 3; Orange, 3; Orleans, 2; Otis, 3; Palmer, 1; 
Pelham, 1; Peru, 1; Petersham, 4; Phillipston, 3; Pittsfield, 
1; Plain ville, 1; Plympton, 1; Provincetown, 1; Randolph, 1; 
Raynham, 1; Revere, 9; Rockland, 4; Rowe, 1; Rowley, 1; 
Royalston, 2; Russell, 2; Salem, 2; Sandisfield, 1; Sandwich, 
1; Savoy, 2; Scituate, 1; Sheffield, 3; Shirley, 1; South- 
borough, 1; Southbridge, 5; Southwick, 6; Sterling, 4; Stough- 
ton, 1; Swampscott, 2; Templeton, 1; Tisbury, 1; Topsfield, 
1; Townsend, 1; Wales, 1; Walpole, 1; Washington, 1; 
Wellesley, 2; Wellfleet, 1; Wendell, 3; Wenham, 1; West 



154 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Newbury, 1; West Springfield, 4; West Stockbndge, 3; West 
Tisbury, 2; Weymouth, 1; Wilbraham, 2; Williamstown, 3; 
Yarmouth, 4. 

Their ages were as follows: 4 between twenty-one and thirty; 
12 between thirty and forty; 25 between forty and fifty; 20 
between fifty and sixty; 80 between sixty and seventy; 92 
between seventy and eighty; 61 between eighty and ninety; 7 
between ninety and one hundred; and 3 whose age was un- 
known. For their support there was paid in 23 cases less than 
$2 per week; in 76 cases from $2 to S3 per week; in 108 cases 
from $3 to $4 per week; and in 97 cases — mostly of old and 
feeble persons — the rate varied from $4 to $12, according to 
the amount of care required. Of the whole number, 66 per 
cent were reported to be in fairly good, or good physical con- 
dition, and 88 per cent in good mental condition. In all but 
4 cases; or 1 per cent, they were apparently receiving good care. 
There were 123 able to do light work, either in the house or 
about the premises. There were 30 supported in their own 
homes. In 150 cases, according to the reports, the overseers 
of the poor complied with the law requiring them to visit the 
paupers at least once in every six months; in 40 cases they 
made one visit a year; in 6 cases the record of visits was un- 
certain; and in the remaining 108 cases no evidence of visits 
was found. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement, provided 
FOR IN Almshouses. 
Visits were made in the cases of 107 children — 49 boys and 
58 girls — reported to be cared for by the following cities and 
towms in their almshouses: Amesbury, 1; Athol, 2; Blackstone, 
1; Boston, 31; Brookline, 1; Cambridge, 4; Fall River, 8; 
Holyoke, 1; Lawrence, 12; Lowell, 21; Melrose, 1; Natick, 1; 
New Bedford, 2; Norwell, 1; Salem, 2; Sherborn, 3; Stock- 
bridge, 1; Waltham, 2; Winchendon, 2; Woburn, 1; Worces- 
ter, 9. In addition to this number, 114 had been removed from 
the almshouse before the time of visitation. Of the number 
visited 35 were so defective in mind or body as to render their 
retention in the almshouse desirable. There were 6 who at- 
tended school. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 155 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement, provided 

FOR outside of ALMSHOUSES. 

As shown by the Board's visitation, of the 1,432 children 
reported by the local authorities as fully supported outside of 
almshouses on January 1, 1915, and on July 1, 1915, 14 were 
unknown, 6 had died and 173 had been removed before visits 
could be made. The remaining 1,239 — 649 boys and 590 girls 
— were supported by 115 cities and towns, as follows: Abing- 
ton, 9; Attleboro, 2; Ayer, 2; Barnstable, 6; Belchertown, 5; 
Beverly, 6; Boston, 677; Brewster, 1; Brockton, 2; Brookline, 
3; Cambridge, 29; Chelsea, 10; Cheshire, 3; Chicopee, 1; 
Clarksburg, 3; Clinton, 2; Cohasset, 1; Conway, 2; Dalton, 
5; Danvers, 1; Dartmouth, 2; Deerfield, 3; Dover, 5; Dux- 
bury, 3; Easthampton, 1; Easton, 5; Everett, 2; Falmouth, 
8; Fitchburg, 3; Framingham, 3; Franklin, 8; Freetown, 1; 
Gardner, 3; Gloucester, 2; Great Barrington, 6; Greenfield, 
5; Hamilton, 1; Hanover, 1; Hanson, 1; Hard wick, 3; Hins- 
dale, 9; Holyoke, 1; Hopkinton, 6; Hull, 1; Lancaster, 1; 
Lawrence, 32; Lenox, 17; Littleton, 3; Lowell, 28; Ludlow, 
3; Lynn, 22; Maiden, 2; Mansfield, 8; Marblehead, 2; 
Marion, 3; Marlborough, 1; Marshfield, 2; Maynard, 1; 
Medford, 1; Melrose, 2; Merrimac, 1; Milford, 1; Millbury, 
1; Milton, 7; Montague, 1; Natick, 4; New Bedford, 13; 
Newburyport, 1; New Salem, 1; Newton, 9; North Adams, 4; 
Northampton, 1; North Andover, 4; North Attleborough, 3; 
Northfield, 2; North Reading, 1; Norton, 1; Norwood, 75; 
Oak Bluffs, 6; Orleans, 2; Oxford, 1; Peabody, 2; Quincy, 1; 
Rochester, 2; Rockland, 3; Rowley, 1; Russell, 5; Salem, 10; 
Saugus, 10; Scituate, 3; Shutesbury, 1; Somerset, 1; Somer- 
ville, 4; Southbridge, 12; Topsfield, 3; Wakefield, 4; W^alpole, 
10; Waltham, 3; Warren, 1; Watertown, 1; Wayland, 2; 
Webster, 4; Wellesley, 2; Wellfleet, 2; Westborough, 1; West 
Boylston, 3; West Bridgewater, 1; Westford, 1; West Spring- 
field, 2; Whately, 5; Whitman, 3; Winchendon, 1; Wlnthrop, 
2; Woburn, 4; Worcester, 9. 

Of the whole number, 185 were cared for and treated in 
public and private hospitals and asylums. There were 903 
who attended school and 259 who did more or less work. Of 



156 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

the whole number, 1,103 were in fairly good physical condition 
and 1,202 in fairly good mental condition. The price of board 
varied from less than $1 per week to $4 per week. These chil- 
dren w^ere found to be well cared for with a few exceptions 
which have been brought to the attention of the local overseers. 

The Penalty incurred by Certain Cities and Towns for 
Failure to make their Pauper Returns during the 
Month of April, 1915. 
Sections 39-42 of chapter 81 of the Revised Laws, as amended 

by chapter 115 of the Acts of 1905, are as follows: — 

Section 39. Overseers of the poor shall keep full and accu- 
rate records, in a form prescribed by the state board of charity, 
of the paupers fully supported, the persons relieved and partially 
supported, and the travellers and vagrants lodged at the expense 
of their cities and towns and of the amount paid for such sup- 
port and relief. 

Section 40. They shall annually in April, for the year ending 
on the last day of March, return to the state board of charity 
the number of such persons supported and relieved, the cost 
thereof, and a record of those fully supported. 

Section 41. In the year nineteen hundred and five and in 
every tenth year thereafter the return of the overseers of the 
poor shall contain true and correct answers to such additional 
inquiries as the state board of charity may deem it advisable 
to make. 

Section 42. If the overseers of the poor of a city or town 
refuse or neglect to comply with the requirements of the three 
preceding sections, such city or town shall forfeit one dollar for 
each day's neglect, and the amount of such forfeiture shall be 
deducted from any amount to which said city or town may be 
entitled in reimbursement for relief of state paupers as provided 
in sections fifteen and sixteen of chapter eighty-five; and if no 
such reimbursement shall be due to said city or town, the for- 
feiture shall be deducted from any money which may be due 
to it from the commonwealth. 

Under these laws the Board reported to the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth the names of the cities and towns that failed 
to make their pauper returns during the month of April, 1915, 
together with the amount of penalty incurred in each instance, 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 157 

as follows: Abington, 82; Amesbury, $2; Athol, S2; Ayer, S9 
Blandford, $11; Boxborough, 82; Chatham, 85; Chester, 82 
Conway, 84; Dighton, 83; Dunstable, 84; Duxbury, 82 
Edgartown, 82; Fall River, 89; Grafton, 82; Heath, 82; Hun- 
tington, 84; Lenox, 82; Leverett, 848; Littleton, 83; Lowell, 
82; Ludlow, 82; Lunenburg, 810; Milford, 82; Monroe, 810; 
Nahant, 8172; New Bedford, $19; New Salem, 82; Otis, 82; 
Peabody, 8156; Peru, 84; Princeton, 85; Quinc}^ 82; Ran- 
dolph, 82; Reading, 87; Russell, 817; Sandwich, 817; Sher- 
born, 83; Southwick, 82; Sterling, 840; Swansea, 82; Tewks- 
bury, 83; Truro, 85; Warwick, 89; West Stockbridge, 82; 
Westminster, 83; Weymouth, 82; Whately, 83; Windsor, 83; 
Winthrop, 84; total, 8632. 

SUPERVISION OF MOTHERS' AID. 

Under the provisions of section 5, chapter 763, Acts of 1913, 
the State Board of Charity is required in its annual report to 
the Legislature to make — 

(a) A report on the work done by its own agents and by 
the overseers of the poor in respect to such families, any of 
whose members are without legal settlement in the Commonivealih. 

(b) A separate report on the work done by the overseers in 
respect to such families all of whose members have a legal 
settlement in the Commonwealth. 

In accordance with the foregoing requirements the following 
report for the year December 1, 1914, to November 30, 1915, 
is submitted : — 

From Table on pages 158 and 159 it appears that notices 
have been received since September 1, 1913, the date when 
this law went into effect, showing that the local overseers 
had received applications for aid on behalf of 4,219 mothers, 
and that these mothers had an aggregate of 13,092 dependent 
children under fourteen years of age. Three thousand seventy- 
eight, or 73 per cent, of these applicants were widows. Three 
thousand seven hundred seventy-nine, or nine-tenths, had legal 
settlement within the Commonwealth, and were therefore 
chargeable to the local communities, the State treasury reim- 
bursing one-third the cost instead of paying all as in unsettled 
cases. 



158 



STATE BOARD OF CH.IRITY. [P. D. 17. 



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160 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



As appears also from the tabulation the notices for the year 
1915 show 107 unsettled mothers, of whom 76 were widows, 
with a total of 222 dependent children under fourteen years of 
age. The whole number of dependent children found with the 
107 mothers was 316. These figures when compared with the 
corresponding items for the preceding year show a decrease of 
73 mothers with 214 dependent children, — a falling off of ap- 
proximately 40 per cent. 

Among the settled cases the notices for 1915 show 1,145 
mothers with 3,547 dependent children. Eight hundred fifty- 
one were widows with 2,607 dependent children. Comparison 
with the preceding year again shows a falling off, the mothers 
being 339 less and the dependent children fewer by 921. This 
is a decrease of approximately 22 per cent. 

In the aggregate there were 1,252 notices received this year 
as against 1,664 last 3^ear, a decrease of about one-fourth. 

In any consideration of this law and its operation the ques- 
tion of geographical location is of more than passing interest. 
The following list shows all the cities and towns in which 
mothers' aid has been furnished during the year, together with 
the number of cases active at the end of the period. The total 
list of localities is 165 out of a possible 353 cities and towns, 
and the total number of cases active was 2,798. The largest 
community failing to report cases under this law was New- 
buryport, with a population of 14,949. 



List of Cities and Towns furnishing Mothers' Aid, and Number of Cases 







active November 30, 1915. 








Cases 


Cases 


Acton 1 


Billerica 3 


Agawam . 






2 


Bourne 






1 


Amesbury 






2 


Boston 






1,023 


Andover . 






4 


Boylston . 






2 


Ashland . 






3 


Braintree . 






7 


Athol 






1 


Bridgewater 






2 


Attleboro . 






11 


Brockton . 






. 27 


Avon 






2 


Brookline . 






. 28 


Barnstable 






2 


Burlington 






1 


Barre 






1 


Cambridge 






. 132 


Berlin 






1 


Charlemont 






1 


Beverly 






23 


Chelmsford 






4 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



161 



List of Cities and Towns furnishing Mothers' Aid, and Number of Cases 
active November 30, 1915 — Continued. 











Cases 


Chelsea 57 


Chester 








1 


Chicopee 
Clinton 








14 

4 


Concord 








7 


Danvers 








9 


Dartmouth 








1 


Dedham 








8 


Deerfield 








1 


Douglas 
Dracut 








1 
4 


Dudley 
Easthampt 
East Longi 
Easton 


on . 
neadow 






2 
2 
1 

1 


Edgartown 
Erving 

Essex 






1 
1 
1 


Everett . 






49 


Fall River 






55 


Falmouth . 






2 


Fitchburg . 
Foxborough 
Framingham , 
Freetown . 






15 
1 

13 
1 


Gardner . 






3 


Gloucester 






20 


Grafton . 






1 


Great Barrington 
Greenfield 






5 
3 


Groveland 






1 


Hamilton . 






2 


Hanson 








1 


Haverhill 








20 


Hingham 
Holden 








2 

1 


Holliston 








3 


Holyoke 

Hopedale 

Hudson 








46 
2 
1 


Hull . 








3 


Holbrook 








1 



Cases 



Ipswich 

Lawrence . 

Lee . 

Leicester . 

Leominster 

Lexington 

Lincoln 

Lowell 

Lynn . 

Maiden 

Mansfield 

Marblehead 

Marlborough 

Marshfield 

Medford . 

Melrose 

Merrimac . 

Middleborough 

Methuen . 

Milford . 

Milton 

Monson 

Montague 

Nahant 

Nantucket 

Natick 

Needham . 

New Bedford 

Newbury . 

Newton 

North Adams 

North And over 

North Brookfield 

North Attleborough 

Northampton 

Northborough 

Norton 

Orange 

Otis . 

Palmer 

Peabody 

Pittsfield 



162 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



List of Cities mid Towns furnishing Mothers^ Aid, and Number of 
active November 30, 1915 — Concluded. 



Plainville 

Plympton 

PljTnouth 

Quincy 

Reading 

Randolph 

Revere 

Rockland 

Rowlej^ 

Rutland 

Salem 

Saugus 

Scituate 

Seekonk 

Sherborn 

Shirley 

Somerville 

South Hadley. 

Southborough 

Southbridge 

Spencer 

Springfield 

Stockbridge 

Stoneham . 

Stoughton 

Sturbridge 

Swampscott 

Taunton . 

Templeton 

Tewksbury 



Cases 



1 

1 

11 

17 
8 
2 

22 
6 
3 
1 

41 
8 
2 
1 
2 
2 

49 
3 
3 

13 
4 

61 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 

31 
2 
3 











Casea 


Upton 2 


Wakefield . 








13 


Waltham . 








30 


Walpole . 








3 


Ware . 








2 


Wareham . 










Warren 










Watertown 








10 


Webster . 










Wellesley . 










West Bridgewater 








West Newbury 


. 






Westborough . 








Westfield . 








Westford . 








West Springfield 








Westvvood 








WejTnouth 






11 


Williamsburg . 








Williamstown . 








Wilmington 








Winchendon 






2 


Winchester 






5 


Winthrop . 






8 


Woburn . 






18 


Worcester 






115 


Wrentham 






2 


165 locahties . 


2,798 



Under the present law mothers' aid is not a pension. It is 
relief, given out of the public treasury to a fit and needy mother 
of dependent children after the fact has been established that 
there is need of aid and that the mother is fit. 

Since it is relief, mothers' aid is administered by relief boards, 
just as health matters are administered by health boards, or 
school matters are administered by school boards. 

The relief system already established in Massachusetts con- 
sists of local boards of overseers of the poor, and a central 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 163 

supervisory State Board of Charity. In the interests of econ- 
omy as well as of efficiency this estabHshed system is used in 
carrying out the provisions of the mothers' aid law. It is not 
necessary to create at great additional expense an entirely new 
system for the administration of this particular form of relief. 

The experience of the past two and a half years has proved 
that the overseers (with very few exceptions) are capable of 
doing the work required of them under the mothers' aid law. 

Unquestionably the overseers of the poor are doing much 
better work under the mothers' aid law than they have ever 
done before. Each family problem is coming more and more 
to be considered by the overseer an intensely individual prob- 
lem, requiring thorough investigation, for the purpose of secur- 
ing a working knowledge of the facts of the case necessary to 
the making of a suitable and comprehensive family plan. 

The overseer, or the overseers' agent, to whose care a special 
family is assigned, renders to the local board of overseers a 
report, in writing, of his findings, together with his recom- 
mendation. The case is then discussed by the board of over- 
seers, a plan for the family is formulated and the amount and 
nature of relief is decided upon. The report is placed on file 
in the office of the overseers, and the State Board of Charity 
is notified as soon as the aid begins. 

Frequent visits to the home as well as the required quarterly 
visits are made by the overseers, and the plan is modified to 
meet changing conditions. A record of such changes is kept, 
and once a year each case is carefully reconsidered to determine 
whether aid shall continue or be discontinued. 

Different boards of overseers have developed elaborate 
systems of filing and of bookkeeping. One overseer visited 
six different cities where good systems of filing were used 
before he installed his own system. 

In several cases the overseers have hired trained women 
investigators to visit their mothers' aid families. 

The Relief Officers' Association meetings serve as an open 
forum, where the mothers' aid law is discussed and advice upon 
complicated cases is asked and given. 

Few differences of opinion between the overseers of the poor 
and the supervisory board have arisen. Correspondence has 



164 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

given way to conference over disputed cases, with the result 
that agreements have been more easily reached. 

The quarterly reports show a decided improvement in the 
families receiving mothers' aid. 

The most noticeable improvement is shown in the health of 
the members of the families receiving mothers' aid. Expert 
medical examination and treatment; necessary surgical opera- 
tions; proper hospital, sanatorium or other institutional care; 
scientific follow-up work in clinics and by means of district 
nurses; as well as measures looking toward prevention of dis- 
ease have resulted in vastly improved conditions of health. 

Housmg conditions in mothers' aid families show improve- 
ment. Better tenements are required, though it often means 
an increase in rent. A healthful location, good environment 
and proper sleeping accommodations are insisted upon. Owners 
are willing to improve and repair the widows' tenements if 
they are sure that the rent will be paid regularly. 

Working conditions in mothers' aid families show improve- 
ment. Overseers are finding better paid and less laborious forms 
of work for the working members of mothers' aid families. 
Some overseers have secured regular employment in mills and 
factories, and opportunities for trade education and vocational 
guidance for boys and girls just starting to work. 

There are few opportunities for regular employment of a 
suitable kind open to children between the ages of fourteen 
and sixteen years. The compulsory education laws require 
such children, if not regularly employed, to attend day schools; 
therefore, many such children in families receiving mothers' 
aid are now obliged to continue at grammar or high schools 
after they reach the age of fourteen years. 

Children between the ages of fourteen and sixteen years, who 
reside in cities where compulsory continuation schools are estab- 
lished (as is the case in Boston), even if they secure regular em- 
ployment, must attend continuation school four hours each 
week between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Some employers are un- 
willing to allow such children to attend continuation school, 
owing to the difficulty in arranging their shifts, or because 
they are unwilling to pay the same wages for shortened 
hours. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 165 

Moreover, many children between the ages of fourteen and 
sixteen years are undersized or otherwise physically unable to 
work. Since many children under sixteen years of age are 
unable to work, and are, in consequence, actually dependent 
upon their mothers for support, the question is raised whether 
it is not now advisable to amend the present law so as to make 
aid under the provisions of chapter 763 available for mothers 
with dependent children under sixteen years of age. 

In last year's report the Board published those of its policies 
or rules of procedure which had crystallized sufficiently for 
concrete expression. Such rules are always a process of growth. 
In the final form which has resulted from this year's experience, 
and in which they are issued to local officers, they are as 
follows : — 

Policies relating to Chapter 763, Acts of 1913. 

1. Money on Hand. — Aid should not be granted to a mother 
who has funds in excess of S200. The applicant should be re- 
quired to show her bank book to the overseers when she applies 
for mothers' aid. 

2. Equity in Property. — Aid should not be granted to a 
mother if she has equity in property in excess of 8500; if the 
assessed value of the property is more than $1,500; or if the 
payments on the mortgage are other than a reasonable rate of 
interest; or in the case of a widow if the equity has been ac- 
quired since her husband's death. Taxes on property should 
be abated whenever possible. 

3. Temporary Need. — Aid should not be granted to a mother 
unless it seems probable that need of aid under this law will exist 
for more than one year. 

4. Desertion. — Aid should not be granted to a mother whose 
husband has deserted his family, unless a warrant for nonsup- 
port has been issued under the provisions of chapter 456, Acts 
of 1911; until one year has elapsed since the desertion occurred; 
and until every effort has been made to apprehend the deserting 
husband. 

5. Insurance. — Considering the allowance for burial expenses, 
aid should not be granted to a mother who is paying insurance 
upon the lives of her children or upon the lives of other relatives. 

Also: Aid should not be granted to a mother who is paying 
insurance upon her own life or upon the life of her totally in- 
capacitated husband if such policies can be converted into paid- 
up policies, or if they have a reasonable cash surrender value. 



16G STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

C. Burial. — It is the desire of the State Board of Charity 
that the allowance for burial shall be wholly suitable. When 
the overseers are in doubt the State Board of Charity will be 
glad to advise. 

7. Medical Aid. — Medical aid required by the mother or de- 
pendent children under fourteen years of age, either in the home 
or in the hospital should be granted under the provisions of this 
act. Medical aid for other members of the family should be 
granted under the provisions of regular relief statutes. Reim- 
bursement by the Commonwealth for medical aid in the home 
will be made in accordance with the provisions of chapter 292, 
Acts of 1909. Reimbursement by the Commonwealth for hos- 
pital aid will be made at a flat rate not exceeding 810.50 per 
week. 

8. Tuberculosis. — Aid should not be granted to a mother if a 
member of the family has tuberculosis in a communicable stage 
unless such person shall apply for admission to a sanatorium, and 
shall agree, pending admission to the sanatorium, to conduct 
himself in a manner prescribed by the local health authorities; 
and also unless the other members of the family have been 
examined for tuberculosis. 

9. Male Lodgers. — Aid should not be granted to a mother if 
she has male lodgers or boarders other than the father or brother 
of applicant. 

10. Illegitimate Children. — Aid should not be granted to a 
mother with illegitimate children unless with the approval of the 
State Board of Charity. 

11. Woman icith One Child. — Aid should not be granted to 
a mother whose only child is under fourteen years of age, unless 
the mother, by reason of illness of either mother or child, is 
unable to provide proper support. 

12. Part-time Work for Mother. — Only such part-time work 
as the mother can do without detriment to her health and with- 
out neglecting her home and her children should be encouraged. 
If a member of a family of working age claims to be unable to 
work because of illness, a physician should examine the person 
to determine his ability to work and to prescribe for his medical 
needs. 

13. Work for Children over Fourteen Years of Age. — Every 
dependent child upon reaching the age of fourteen years should 
go to work for the time allowed by the school attendance laws, 
provided that he is physically able to work, and also, provided 
that suitable employment can be obtained for him. 

14. Kind of Aid {Method of Disbursement). — Cash aid should 
be granted in every case if the mother is found to be competent 
to manage cash. All allowances should be granted weekly. A 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 167 

card catalogue system rather than a pay roll is recommended. 
Checks on the city or town treasurer, post office money orders, 
or registered letters are approved methods of disbursement. 

15. Amount of Aid — Family Budget. — In determining the 
amount of aid necessary for a given family, not only the number 
of persons in an applicant's family, but also the health, the age 
and the capabilities of each member of the family should be 
considered. The former income, and the former standards of 
living of the family, as well as the standards of self-supporting 
citizens in the neighborhood, should also be considered. 

The amount of weekly aid should vary with the changing 
needs of the family; for instance, aid should be increased in 
time of sickness^ and it should be decreased proportionately as 
the earning capacity, or the income of the family from any other 
source increases. Aid should be discontinued as soon as the 
family becomes self-supporting. 

Weekly Expenses. — The following items of expense are sug- 
gested for the careful consideration of the overseers when esti- 
mating the amount of aid necessary for a given family: — 

Food — extra food allowance should be made for members of 
the family who are predisposed to tuberculosis or who are con- 
valescing from illness. In large families the per capita food 
allowance may be somewhat reduced. 

Rent — a reasonable amount for a suitable tenement of proper 
size in a desirable location. 

Fuel — 

Clothing — 

Weekly Income. — The following sources of weekly income 
should be carefull}' considered by the overseers in estimating the 
weekly income of a given family: — 

Income from funds, pensions, rentals, etc. 

Aid from relatives and societies. 

Net wages of mother for part-time work. 

Net wages of children of working age. 

The amount of aid needed by a given family may be esti- 
mated by finding the difference between the total weekly expenses 
of the family and its net weekly income. 



Policy 2, as set out above, now states definitely the maximum 
amount of equity and the maximum amount of assessed valua- 
tion, approved by the State Board of Charity. Formerly all 
cases involving ownership of property were referred to the 
State Board of Charity by the overseers before they granted 
mothers' aid. 



168 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Policy 3 disapproves the payment by the mother of in- 
surance upon the lives of her dependent children under four- 
teen years of age, in lieu of which (in case of the death of 
such a child) the payment of burial expenses of a reasonable 
amount for a wholly suitable burial is authorized. 

Policy 3 further stipulates that in cases where the life of the 
applicant, or the life of her totally incapacitated husband, is 
insured, a paid-up policy shall be secured if possible; or if 
there is a cash surrender value of a reasonable amount the 
applicant is expected to secure it. 

As a result of a study of 100 typical cases the average amount 
of insurance now paid in mothers' aid families was found to be 
50 cents per week per family. At this rate, in the 2,800 cases 
now active, $1,400 per week, or $72,800 per year, would be 
spent out of the mothers' aid allowance. The question nat- 
urally arises. Have we a right to approve savings in the form 
of insurance in cases where the applicant is receiving public 
aid? 

Rules relative to Notice and Reimbursement. 
In furtherance of the policies outlined above, the Board 
has outlined its rules relating to notice and reimbursement, as 
follows : — 

1. An applicant for mothers' aid should apply in person to 
the overseers of the poor of the city or town where she resides, 
and she should file a statement as to her resources and her needs 
on Form 1479. 

2. Aid should be rendered directly to the applicant, or, in case 
of illness, to her authorized adult representative. Minor chil- 
dren should not be allowed to call at the overseers' office for 
mothers' aid. 

3. Overseers of the poor should notify the State Board of 
Charity on Form 1477 or 1478 when they begin to aid under 
the provisions of chapter 763, Acts of 1913, and such original 
notice shall remain in force until the case is closed. 

4. When a recipient of mothers' aid moves out of a city or 
town the case should be closed. A new application for mothers' 
aid should be made to the overseers of the poor of the town to 
which the family has removed. 

5. Whenever a case is closed by the overseers of the poor, the 
overseers should notify the State Board of Charity of the date 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 169 

when the last aid was rendered, and state their reasons for clos- 
ing the case on Form 1475. 

6. Whenever an applicant changes her address the overseers 
of the poor should notify the State Board of Charity. 

7. If a case that has been closed is reopened, the overseers 
should state upon the new notice their reasons for reopening the 
case. 

8. During the temporary absence from the State of a recipient 
of mothers' aid, the weekly payments under the mothers' aid 
law should be suspended unless otherwise authorized by the State 
Board of Charity, 

9. After each quarterly visit (as required by section 3, chap- 
ter 763) the overseers of the poor should report to the State 
Board of Charity on Form 1475 as to conditions in the home 
and as to the continuance or discontinuance of aid. These 
quarterly reports serve as renewal notices and as reports of the 
result of the yearly reconsideration of the case. 

10. Reimbursement by the Commonwealth, in accordance with 
the provisions of section 6, chapter 763, will not be allowed for 
more than ten days prior to the date of mailing of the original 
notice. 

11. Application for burial expenses should be made upon Form 
1480, and this statement should be filed with the bill claiming 
reimbursement from the Commonwealth. 

12. In all cases the overseers of the poor shall furnish satis- 
factory proof that the applicant has resided in Massachusetts 
for three years next prior to the date of her application for 
mothers' aid. 

13. In cases where the overseers of the poor claim that the 
mother aided has no legal settlement, the overseers of the poor 
shall furnish satisfactory proof that there is no settlement in 
any city or town in Massachusetts. 

14. In cases where the mother aided has a lawful settlement 
in another city or town of the Commonwealth, the overseers 
shall notify such city or town when they begin to aid on Form 
1470. Denial of settlement must be made by the overseers of 
the poor thus notified within thirty days. 

15. Bills should be rendered to the Commonwealth semi- 
annually, for the periods ending April 30 and October 31. 

In connection with the foregoing policies and rules it has 
been found advisable to . make use of a uniform application 
blank which shall serve to make information complete and 
uniform in all cases. The blank now in use is as follows: — 



170 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

APPLICATION FOR MOTHERS' AID 

(Chapter 763, Acts of 1913) 

El}t (Hammanmtnitii of MuBBatlfviBttta 

City or Town of 



Name of applicant .... 
Residence of applicant . 
Date of application . . . . 



Full Name of Applicant Date of Birth Birthplace 



Full Name of Husband Date of Birth Birthplace 



Married Date of Marriage Where Married By Whom Married 



Applicant Now Date Court Action Resipence of Husband 

Widowed 

Divorced 

Separated by court 

Deserted 

Husband op Applicant Date Committed Institution At Home 

Insane 

In jail 

Tubercular 

Totally incapacitated 



Dependent Children 
(under 14 years of age) 

Names Birthplace Date of Birth School Grade 



Other Children 

(over 14 years of ^ „^ 

age) Date of Employed Where or 

Names Birthplace Birth Residence Wages Why Not Employed 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 171 

Relatives of Applicaxt 

Names Birthplace Residence Aiding Applicant Able to Aid 



Father . 
Mother. 
Sister . . 



Brother . 



Others . 



Relathes of Husband 

Names Birthplace Residence Aiding Applicant Able to Aid 



Father . 
Mother . 
Sister . . 



Brother. 



Others . 



How long has applicant lived continuously in Massachusetts? , 



Give addresses in Massachusetts for past three consecutive j-ears 
City or Town Street and Ncmber How Long There 



State amount of relief applicant is now ^ecei^'ing from public or private sources 



Present Home of Amount Number 

Applicant Own It of Rent of Rooms Owner's Name Street and Number 



172 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Members of Hoxtsehold Other 
Than Applicant's Children Pat How 

Names Ages Relationship Much Why Not Paying 



Give description, location, and value of any property owned wholly or in part by applicant or 
by her husband or children 

Real Estate Owned By 

(Mark with X) Assessed value 



Applicant Mortgages 

Husband Held by whom 

Children (Give name of 

child owner) 

Rate of interest 

Other payments on the mortgage 

Taxes per year $ Amount abated $ 

Water rates Fire insurance 

Income from rentals Equity .in property , 

State of repair 



Paid-Up 
Cash on Hand or in Bank Savings Insurance In Trust Invested Total Amount 

Applicant 

Husband 

Children (Give name of 
child owner) 



Soldiers' Workmen's Death Benefit Other Legal 

Legal Right Relief Compensation From Societies Pensions Claims 



Applicant . 
Husband . 
Children. . 



Amount of insurance received at death of husband and date when claim was paid and amount 
now on hand 

Amount op Claim Date Received Amount Now on Hand 



Give itemized statement of way money was expended 
Amounts Paid Out To Whom Paid For What Paid 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



173 



Insurance Paid Total Sum Name of Weekly On Whose To Whom 

By Applicant Insured For Kind Company Payments Life Payable 

Applicant 

Husband 



Children 

Other relatives . 



Can any of these policies be converted into paid-up policies 

Has any of these policies a cash surrender value 

Rent Doctor Undertaker Miscellaneous Total 



Debts of 
applicant 



$. 



On What 



To Whom Adjustment 

Paid Amount Paid Amount Due Possible 



Installment . 
payments . . . 
of applicant . 



Religion of Applicant Church Attended 



Pastor 



Is Church Helping 



Health 
Applicant . . . 
Husband . . . 
Children . . . 



Present Condition Doctor Attending 



Medical Needs 



Number of hours per day applicant works away from home . 
How are children cared for at such times 



FAMILY EXPENSES 

PER WEEK 

(estimated) 



Food 

Rent 

Fuel 

Clothing . . 
Insurance . 



Total weekly 
expenses 



FAMILY INCOME PER WEEK 

(estimated) 



Earnings of mother. 
" " children 



Income from funds. 

" " pensions 

" " rentals. . 

" " relatives. 

" " societies. 

" " other sources 
Total weekly income 



Amount 



Amount 
Paid To 



Source Per Week Applicant 



S. 



I hereby certify that the statements herein made by me are complete and true to the best 
of my knowledge and belief. 

(Signed) 

Applicant. 



174 STATE BOAED OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Work of the Mothers' Aid Visitors. 

The visiting staff consists of five women visitors and a 
woman supervisor. A great deal of time has been spent thus 
far by the visitors in working with the overseers on individual 
cases for the purpose of illustrating the kind of work that 
overseers are expected to do and of explaining the method of 
reckoning family budgets. 

After the State Board has been notified that the overseers 
of a certain town have begun to aid a family under the pro- 
visions of chapter 763, the mothers' aid visitor for that district 
calls upon the family to learn the conditions there. She con- 
sults the overseer, learning his point of view, which she is 
then able to interpret more fully to the supervisor. The visi- 
tor prepares a typewritten report of her investigation, adding 
her recommendations on the case. This she reviews with the 
supervisor, and a letter is written to the overseers approving 
or disapproving reimbursement for the aid rendered; recom- 
mending continued aid in approved cases; advising that aid 
cease after a specified date; or suggesting that some change of 
plan, if advisable, be made before approval is given. 

Progress has been necessarily slow to date because work 
under this law has been of a new kind. Such constructive 
work with families, including the giving of adequate relief, has 
taxed the powers of the overseers to the utmost; but the 
adventure has proved to be well worth while, since the twofold 
object for which the mothers' aid law was enacted has been in 
some measure advanced. 

These objects are: first, to provide for suitable aid to 
mothers with dependent children, thus enabling them to bring 
up their children properly in their own homes; and second, to 
raise the standards of relief-giving by means of constructive 
case work with families receiving public aid. 

Appropriation by the Legislature. 
The Legislature of 1915 appropriated $250,000 for the pur- 
pose of reimbursing cities and towns as provided in the law. 
This sum was expended, and on November 30, 1915, there were 
bills outstanding to the amount of 865,524.51. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 175 

ADMINISTRATIVE DUTIES OF THE BOARD. 
The State Outdoor Poor. 
Numbers. 
Unsettled persons in distress are aided in the first instance 
by the city or town in which they are so found. For purposes 
of administration, these State cases are divided into the fol- 
lowing classifications: — 

(a) The sick State poor (Revised Laws, chapter 85, sections 
14, 15). 

(6) Cases of dangerous diseases (Acts of 1902, chapter 213, 
amended by Acts of 1907, chapter 386, and Acts of 1909, chap- 
ter 380). 

(c) Cases of wife-settlement (Revised Laws, chapter 80, sec- 
tion 1, chapter 85, section 16, amended by Acts of 1909, chap- 
ter 98). 

{d) Cases of temporary aid (Revised Laws, chapter 81, sec- 
tion 21, amended by Acts of 1903, chapter 355, amended by 
Acts of 1912, chapter 331). 

The statutes provide that the expense of such relief, follow- 
ing proper notice to the Board, and approval after considera- 
tion, shall be reimbursed by the Commonwealth. In accord- 
ance with these laws, 19,905 such notices were received during 
the ofiicial year from 241 cities and towns, on account of 
50,724 persons and 11,615 patients, a net increase of 2,953, or 
about 17| per cent over the previous year. Of these notices, 
7,674, concerning 7,680 individuals, were on account of persons 
too sick to be removed; 3,318 notices, concerning 3,318 in- 
dividuals, were on account of persons sick with dangerous 
diseases; 1,608 notices, concerning 7,670 individuals, were for 
cases of wife-settlement; and 7,305 notices, covering 32,056 
individuals, were for temporary aid and transportation. Of 
the total number of notices above mentioned, 4,176, concerning 
13,357 individuals, were cases on account of which a previous 
notice had been received during the year. 

(a) Cases of Sick State Poor. — The 7,674 notices of sick 
State poor were sent by 172 cities and towns, concerning 7,680 
persons, who wete represented as too ill to be removed. This 
number shows a net decrease in the number of notices from the 



176 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

previous year of 171, or about 2 per cent, and, as compared 
with the official year, 1912-13, an increase of 535, or about 
7f per cent. The largest number of notices received in any 
one month was 866 in April, and smallest, 492, in September. 
Of these 7,674 notices, 4,127, or about 54 per cent, were from 
the city of Boston, viz., 4,078 from the Boston City Hospital, 
20 from the institutions department and 29 from the Boston 
Lying-in Hospital. The number of visits made by the officers 
of the Board in the investigation of these 7,674 notices was 
18,168. As a result of these investigations, the overseers of the 
poor were directed to discontinue aid in 1,869 cases, on account 
of the recovery of the patient sufficiently to permit of his 
removal to the State Infirmary. In 382 cases aid was refused 
because at the time of the application the patient could have 
been removed without danger. Out of the 5,766 cases investi- 
gated by the visitors, settlements were found in 84, covering 84 
persons. Among those reported as sick there were 535 deaths. 

(b) Cases of Dangerous Diseases. — The number of notices 
received was 3,318 from 105 cities and towns, concerning 3,318 
persons, all patients. These figures show a net increase of 126, 
or about 4 per cent over the previous year, and, as compared 
with the year 1912-13, an increase of 891, or 37 per cent. 
Of these 3,318 notices, 1,017, or about 30f per cent, were 
from the city of Boston. The following diseases were reported : 
anterior poliomyelitis, 7; anthrax, 4; cerebrospinal meningitis, 
10; chicken-pox, 14; diphtheria, 856; dog bite, 4; dysentery, 4; 
leprosy, 1; malaria, 5; measles, 186; mumps, 6; ophthalmia 
neonatorum, 107; scarlet fever, 725; septic sore throat, 3; small- 
pox, 21; suppurative conjunctivitis, 41; tetanus, 1; tuberculosis, 
1,012; typhoid fever, 284; whooping cough, 27. The number of 
visits made by the officers of the Board in these cases was 7,173, 
and of 2,471 new cases investigated, settlements were found in 
270, covering 270 persons. 

(c) Cases of Wife-settlement. — The number of notices re- 
ceived was 1,608 from 93 cities and towns, concerning 7,670 
persons, of whom 617 were sick. These figures show a net 
increase in the number of notices as compared with the pre- 
vious year of 541, or about 51 per cent, and as compared with 
the year 1912-13 an increase of 842, or about 110 per cent. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 177 

Of these 1,608 notices, 791, or about 51 per cent, were from the 
city of Boston. As these 1,608 notices represent men whose 
families have settlements in some city or town within the 
Commonwealth, and 11 of these men were found to have a 
settlement, the total number aided by the State was 1,597, of 
whom 394 were sick. The number of visits made in these 
cases was 1,672. As a result of the visits, the local authorities 
were advised to discontinue aid in 3 cases. 

(d) Cases of Temporary Aid. — The number of notices re- 
ceived was 7,305, concerning 32,056 persons from 202 cities 
and towns. The largest number of notices received in any 
one month was 2,468 in January, and the smallest number 
222 in September. The whole number shows a net increase, 
as compared with the preceding year, of 2,457, or about 50f 
per cent, and with the year 1912-13 an increase of 4,174, or 
about 133 per cent. Of these notices, 1,109, or about 15 per 
cent, were received from the city of Boston. The number of 
visits made under these notices w^as 8,695. There were 2,695 
new cases investigated by the agents of the Board, and 352 
settlements were found, covering 1,528 persons. As a result of 
visitation, aid was discontinued in 651 cases, and in 25 cases 
aid was refused. 

Transportation has been furnished during the year to 276 
persons; of these, 83 were sent to European countries, viz., 
Azores, 17; England, 13; Finland, 4; Greece, 1; Ireland, 3; 
Italy, 25; Scotland, 20; 42 to Canada and other British 
Provinces; 145 to other States, viz., California, 3; Connecticut, 
20; Illinois, 7; Maine, 5; Michigan, 6; Minnesota, 3; New 
Hampshire, 6; New Jersey, 3; New York, 61; North Carolina, 
1; Ohio, 12; Pennsylvania, 17; Rhode Island, 2; Vermont, 1; 
Virginia, 4 (Revised Laws, chapter 81, section 21). 

Transportation has also been provided for 7 shipwrecked 
seamen from Chatham to Boston (Revised Laws, chapter 66, 
section 7). 

Cost. 

The number, amount and allowance of the bills examined 
by the Board, on account of cases of sick State poor, wife- 
settlement, dangerous diseases, temporary aid and burials 
are shown in the following tabulation. It is to be noted that 



178 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



the total shown in this table may vary somewhat from the 
total paid out of the treasury during the fiscal year from the 
appropriation in question. This possible variance arises from 
the fact that bills audited by this Board are in some cases not 
actually paid during the year for which the audit is shown. 
For actual expenditures out of these respective appropriations 
see page 221, post. 



Classes of Cases 


Bills 


Claims 


Allowance 


Deduction 


Sick State poor: — 

Boston City Hospital 

Other cases 

Wife-settlement 

Dangerous diseases: — 

Boston City Hospital 

Other cases 

Temporary aid 

Mothers with dependent children . 
Burial 


2.645 
1,888 
1,208 

659 
1,256 
5,218 
4,576 

680 


S34,502 14 
32,180 90 
12,060 94 

22,835 29 

49,395 20 

133,962 14 

254,111 61 

8,191 73 


S27,354 14 
25,817 39 
11,828 30 

20.399 29 

39,600 38 

124,993 63 

249,999 62 

6,999 91 


S7,148 00 

6,363 51 

232 64 

2,436 00 
9,794 82 
8,968 51 
4,111 99 
1,191 82 


Totals 


18,130 


S547,239 95 


S506,992 66 


§40,247 29 



The item for temporary aid in the above tabulation includes 
$3,993.30 expended for transportation of the 276 State paupers 
above referred to, and $16.70 for the conveyance of the 7 
shipwrecked seamen. 



Classes of Cases 


Cases 
investigated 


Settlements 
found 


Persons 
settled 


Sick state poor 

Dangerous diseases 

Wife-settlement 

Temporary aid 

Burial . 


5,766 
2,471 

556 
2,695 

550 


84 
270 

11 
352 


84 

270 

11 

1,528 


Totals 


12,038 


717 


1,893 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



179 



Settlement Work. 
The following table is a summary of the work done during 
the year, in the examination and in the investigation of settle- 
ments of inmates of the State institutions : — 



Instittttions 


o 
a 


3 
1 

o 


i 


a 

1 
1 


CI 

1 


-:3 


State Infirmary 


4.674 


906 


488 


182 


106 


776 


State Farm 




5,323 


176 


72 


38 


18 


128 


Lakeville State Sanatorium . 




396 


223 


186 


18 


- 


204 


North Reading State Sanatorium 




256 


179 


156 


11 


- 


167 


Rutland State Sanatorium , 




475 


342 


302 


19 


- 


321 


Westfield State Sanatorium . 




218 


167 


144 


11 


- 


155 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 




42 


42 


35 


9 


- 


44 


Norfolk State Hospital 




1,254 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Oflfice 




271 


: 


: 


~ 


2 




School for Feeble-minded . 




2 


Foxborough State Hospital . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Monson State Hospital . 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Westborough State Hospital 




- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Totals 


12,909 


2,035 


1,383 


288 


132 


1.803 



Cases pending November 30, 1914 
Cases pending November 30, 1915 



590 
822 



Removals. 
The Board is charged with the duty of removing sane paupers 
to cities or towns within the State or, when not belonging in 
Massachusetts, to the State or place where they belong. The 
following table shows the removals made during the year : — 



180 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 







Removed 


FROM — 




REMOVED TO- 


State 
Infirmary 


State 
Farm 


Local 
Office 


Totals 


Other countries: — 










Canada 


20 


2 


15 


37 


Finland 


2 


- 


_ 


2 


Great Britain 


12 


_ 


14 


26 


Greece 


12 


1 


- 


13 


Italy 


20 


- 


9 


29 


Portugal (Azores) 


4 


- 


- 


4 


Sweden 


5 


_ 


_ 


5 


West Indies 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Discharged to United States Commis- 
sioner of Immigration for deportation 
to various countries .... 


27 


. 


. 


27 


Totals 


102 


3 


39 


144 


Other States: — 










Colorado 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Connecticut 


11 


- 


3 


14 


District of Columbia .... 


2 


- 


6 


8 


Florida 


1 


_ 


2 


3 


Illinois 


3 


- 


3 


6 


Indiana 


1 


- 


2 


3 


Iowa 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Maine 


18 


3 


29 


50 


Maryland 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Michigan 


- 


1 


2 


3 


New Hampshire 


47 


7 


10 


64 


New Jersey 


4 


- 


11 


15 


New York 


23 


6 


38 


67 


North Carolina . . . . 


2 


- 


- 


2 


Ohio 


2 


- 


3 


5 


Pennsylvania 


6 


- 


9 


15 


Rhode Island 


17 


14 


13 


44 


South Carolina 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Vermont 


9 


- 


4 


13 


Virginia 


1 


- 


3 


4 


West Virginia 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Totals 


149 


32 


141 


322 


Town of residence 


2,278 


4,743 


71 


7,092 


Grand total ....". 


- 


- 


- 


7,558 



Summary of Removals. 





1913 


1914 


1915 


To other countries 

To other States 

To town of residence 


178 

225 

6,529 


201 

242 

6,838 


144 

322 

7,092 


Totals 


6,932 


7,281 


7,558 



Part I.] GENERAL \YORK OF THE BOARD. 181 

The After-care of Women and Children discharged by 
THE Board from the State Infir^l^ry. 

The necessity for this after-care work, which has been very 
carefully developed during the past four years, is now ap- 
parent. Its social value is as important as its economic prob- 
lem. So vital is this social aspect that perfunctory discharge 
of this class of cases from any institution should never be 
permitted. The need of co-operation from private organiza- 
tions and individuals is always urgent, as the Board must 
make some disposition of every case that becomes a public 
dependent, whereas the private society may select such cases 
as come within the scope of the work it designs to do. 

During the year consideration has been given to 234 women 
admitted with 137 children, in addition to 46 women with 37 
children who were inmates at the beginning of the year. Of 
the admitted cases 146 women were pregnant, accompanied 
by 22 children, and 8S were not pregnant, accompanied by 
115 children. 

One hundred thirty eight of these women were unmarried, 
and may be classified as follows : — 

Pregnant for first illegitimate child 73 

Pregnant for second illegitimate child (accompanied by 6 first 

illegitimate children) 19 

Pregnant for third illegitimate child (accompanied by 4 illegitimate 

children) 5 

Xot pregnant (accompanied by 29 first illegitimate children) . . 29 

Not pregnant (accompanied by 11 second illegitimate children) . 9 

Not pregnant (accompanied by 2 third illegitimate children) . . 2 

Not pregnant (accompanied by 2 fourth illegitimate children, twins) 1 

138 

The 96 married women may be classified as follows : — 

Pregnant for illegitimate children 13 

Pregnant for legitimate children 29 

Pregnant for legitimate children (accompanied by 12 legitimate 

children) 7 

Xot pregnant (accompanied by 4 illegitimate children) ... 4 

Not pregnant (accompanied by 67 legitimate children) ... 43 

96 



182 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

There were 120 births (35 legitimate and 85 illegitimate). 

The total number of deaths was 37 (seven women and 30 
children), 6 of whom were premature births, whose mothers 
were syphilitic; 10 were tubercular; and 2 had congenital 
syphilis. All the women were given an examination for gon- 
orrhoea, and the Wassermann test for syphilis, resulting in 25 
positive Wassermanns; 10 doubtful; and 56 cases of gonorrhoea, 
— a total of 91 cases. Thirty-four per cent of the women 
admitted, therefore, showed a positive diagnosis of disease, 
an increase of 14 per cent over last year's average. 

Twenty-one of the 50 women observed for feeble-mindedness 
were adjudged by the alienist as proper cases for institutional 
care. Owing to lack of accommodations at the schools for 
feeble-minded, many of these cases have been continued as 
inmates of the State Infirmary. 

The birthplaces of the women were as follows: — 

Ireland 55 

llDited States (including 9 colored) 39 

Poland 33 

France 23 

Italy 21 

Canadian Pro\ances 16 

Greece 12 

England 11 

Sweden 7 

Portugal 5 

Syria 5 

Russia 3 

Armenia 2 

Scotland 1 

Belgium 1 

Sixty-nine were employed at general housework; 55, mill 
and factory operatives; 25, waitresses; 14, miscellaneous occu- 
pations; 18, single; and 53, married or deserted women at 
home. 

The number discharged during the year was 220 women 
and 219 children, disposed of as follows: — 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



183 



Where sext 



Women 



Children 



To relatives 

To friends 

Deported 

Discharged to United States Commissioner of Immigration for 

deportation. 
Sent to other States 

Discharged to overseers of the poor of the city or town of legal 

settlement. 
Committed to Wrentham State School 

Committed to Division of State Minor Wards .... 

Referred to private societies 

Placed at housework 

Absconded 

Totals 



81 


91 


8 


4 


19 


20 


7 


7 


4 


3 


10 


11 


7 


- 


- 


17 


36 


27 


39 


38 


9 


1 


220 


219 



Fifty cases were referred to our law* clerk for legal consid- 
eration, resulting in the commitment of 7 women to the 
Wrentham State School and court action in 15 other cases. 
A continuing order of support for the child was secured in 8 
cases; 4 lump sum settlements made and 2 cases referred to 
authorities in other States. In 8 cases prosecution was deemed 
inadvisable, and in 11 cases we were unable to locate the 
alleged father. Although probation officers in the respective 
courts have quite generally taken upon themselves the duty 
of collecting the money which the court orders the defendant 
to pay, and forwarded it directly to the mothers of the children 
for whom the support was intended, a considerable amount 
($1,566.32) has been referred to this division. In this way 13 
new bank accounts were opened by the superintendent acting 
as trustee. 

The follow-up work is one of the most important phases 
of this undertaking and should be further extended. The 
need of an additional visitor is urgent. The amount of work 
accomplished has been made possible by our volunteers who 
have given most efficient service. One hundred two women 
are under our immediate supervision, which includes 36 at 
housework with their babies; 15 doing mill or shop work, their 
babies boarding in homes where the mothers live; 28 with 



184 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

relatives; 17 paying their babies' board to the Division of 
State Minor Wards or private societies, who are obliged to 
visit the children frequently; and 6 in various employments, 
all of whom have lost their babies by death. The separation 
of mothers from their babies is always disapproved, unless the 
mother is found to be unfit to give proper care. Eight mar- 
riages have been arranged and 43 women replaced. 

Forty-six applications made to this division, relating to 
women in the community but who were not inmates of the 
State Infirmary, who have applied for assistance were disposed 
of as follows : — 

Referred to private charities 19 

Sent to relatives or friends 18 

Referred to overseers of the poor of the city or town of legal settle- 
ment 4 

Sent to the State Infirmary 5 



46 



Children in the Care and Custody of the Board. 
By reference to the tables on page 196, et seq., it appears 
that at the beginning of the last official year, December 1, 
1914, there were 5,604 children in the care and custody of the 
Board, — 328 delinquent children, 42 wayward children, 3,068 
neglected children and 2,166 dependent children. There were 
1,008 children received during the year, viz., 148 delinquent 
children, 12 wayward children, 418 neglected children and 
430 dependent children. The total number under care during 
the year was, therefore, 6,612. There were 674 discharged, viz., 
146 delinquent children, 13 wayward children, 303 neglected 
children and 212 dependent children. At the close of the 
year, November 30, 1915, there remained in charge of the 
Board, therefore, 5,942 children, classified as: delinquent chil- 
dren, 330; wayward children, 41; neglected children, 3,183; 
and dependents, 2,384. Of the 6,612 children under care, 
6,118 were over three years of age and were cared for as fol- 
lows: in places receiving wages, 710; in places free of expense 
to the State for board, 594; in places partly supported by the 
State, 129; in places fully supported by the State, 3,438; at 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 185 

the State Infirmary and other institutions not penal, subject 
to care and treatment, 471; married, 19; and whereabouts 
unknown, 163.^ 

Children under Three Years of Age. 

The total number of infants in charge of the Board at the 
beginning of the official year, December 1, 1914, was 376; the 
number received during the year was 291, making the whole 
number supported by the State, 667. There remained at the 
close of the official year, November 30, 1915, 408 infants. Of 
the 667 infants supported, 10 were legally adopted, 173 were 
transferred, having reached the age of three years; 31 were 
discharged to parents or relatives, 4 to places of settlement, 
5 to courts and 36 died. Twenty-six of the remaining 408 were 
in free homes. 

Sixty-three of the 291 infants received were committed by 
the overseers of the poor and 12 by the superintendent of the 
State Infirmary, under the provisions of section 20, chapter 
83 of the Revised Laws. Twenty-two of this number were 
foundlings, and the remainder were indigent infants having no 
known settlement in the Commonwealth. 

One hundred thirty-five children were received under section 
36, chapter S3; 1 was received under section 13, chapter 83; 
8 were removed from unsuitable boarding places under section 
26, and 4 under section 17, chapter 83; and 68 were committed 
as neglected under the provisions of chapter 334, as amended 
by chapter 131 of the Acts of the year 1909. 

The medical visitor and his assistants made 6,322 visits. 
This number includes visits to infant wards boarded in families, 
investigation of homes of applicants for infant wards to board, 
and inspection of homes of applicants for licenses to board 
infants; also, physical examination of children at this office, 
at the Nursery and at the temporary home on Charles Street. 

1 In addition to these 5,942 children the Board had under supervision and visitation November 
30, 1915, 47S inmates of the Lyman School for Boys; 264 inmates of the State Industrial School 
for Girls; 245 inmates of the Industrial School for Boys; 1,249 boys and 391 girls in the custody of 
the Trustees for Massachusetts Training Schools outside of the schools; 160 boys and 110 girls, 
inmates of the Massachusetts Hospital School; 144 boys and 149 girls, inmates of the four State 
sanatoria; 68 boys and 125 girls, inmates of the State Infirmary, who are either young infants 
with their mothers, or else under hospital treatment; 386 inmates of the county training schools, 
and 1,239 children supported at the expense of the cities and towns, making, approximately, a 
total of 10,950 children in the care and custody and under the supervision of the Board. 



186 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

There were 314 children admitted to the Nursery. 

The percentage of mortality for the year, for the whole 
number supported, was 5.39. 

One hundred ninety-seven of the 667 infants supported 
during the year were under one year of age, though some of 
these reached the one year mark before November 30. Twenty- 
one of this whole number died, making the percentage of deaths 
for infants in this group 10.65. 

Of the 21 deaths 5 were among those who had become one 
year old in the course of the year, thus making the actual 
number of deaths of infants under one year, 16, and the per- 
centage 8.12. 

There has been a gradual decrease in the mortality rate. 
From 1894 to 1905 the average rate was 10.4 per cent. From 
1905 to 1915 it was 7.5. The decrease is more noticeable in 
the last five years. From 1905 to 1910 the average rate was 
10.05, and from 1910 to 1915 it was 5.98. This year, 1915, it 
was 5.39, the lowest since the boarding-out system was adopted 
in 1880. 

Of the 36 deaths, 9 died at the State Infirmary; 3 of these 
died of congenital syphilis. 

There were 22 foundlings received during the year, 3 less 
than last year. In 4 cases the parentage has been found. 

Children under three years of age are under the direct care 
of three registered nurses, who visit and report their condition 
at least once a month. They also visit and report on the 
homes of applicants for infants to board and licensed boarding 
houses for infants. To these duties there has been added during 
the year the work formerly done by the inspector of private 
boarding houses for infants. 



Children over Three Years of Age. 
A review of the work of this department for the past year 
shows a gradual increase in the number of our wards, with 
correspondingly increased duties in every branch of the work. 
The total number of children over three years of age in charge 
of the Board November 30, 1914, was 5,530, 2,279 girls and 
3,251 boys, — an increase of 302 children for the year; 1,008 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 187 

new children were admitted during that period, which is 91 
more than the number received in 1914. 

One of the most important changes denoting progress was 
made at the beginning of the year by the appointment of 
four additional visitors to older boys. Previous to this time 
each visitor had in charge a group of boys altogether too large 
to allow adequate supervision. The addition of four men to 
the staff has made it possible to lessen the territory and 
decrease the number of boys assigned to each visitor. As a 
result, more frequent visitation has been secured, thus making 
for better individual work and efficiency. There are 1,631 boys 
over twelve years of age in this group, and 1,184 are above the 
age of fourteen years. Of this latter number, 353, or 29 per 
cent are attending school under the following conditions: 12 
receiving wages, 58 free of expense, 33 partly free, 223 boarded 
and 27 on parole, and 94 at college or high school. One hun- 
dred boys, or 8.4 per cent are learning trades. One hundred 
seventy-three boys at farm work average $9.89 and board 
monthly; the average weekly wage of 202 boys at other em- 
ployment is 87.89. 

In the older girls' department there are 953 girls twelve years 
of age and over. The average number in care of each visitor 
is 73. Each of these girls presents a separate problem, and 
makes many demands upon the time and attention of her 
visitor. It is only by untiring personal service on the part of 
the visitors that a thorough understanding of the girl can be 
obtained and plans made for a solution of her problem. Six 
hundred thirty-two of these girls are above the age of fourteen 
years. Of this number, 296, or 46 per cent, are attending 
school, 15 receiving wages, 123 in free or partly free school 
homes, 155 boarded and 3 with parents; 101 girls, or 16 per 
cent of the number over fourteen years of age, are at high 
schools or colleges; 47 are learning trades. 

When possible, it is the practice of this department to place 
members of a family in the same foster home, and to en- 
courage worthy parents in providing suitable homes to which 
the children may be returned. It is often considered advisable 
to release a child on parole instead of discharging from custody. 
By this method the child is allowed the benefit of family life 



188 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

in his own home, and the burden and privilege of caring for 
him is given to those to whom it naturally belongs. He still 
remains under the protection and supervision of this depart- 
ment, until, the object of commitment having been fully 
accomplished, it seems advisable to discharge from custody. 
Many cases are discharged at the end of one year of parole, 
but several have been kept under supervision for two and three, 
or even four, years. This releasing on parole makes extra 
demands on the visitors' time, but is a saving to the Common- 
wealth in other ways, of which the most important are main- 
taining the family unity and placing responsibility where it 
belongs. 

During the past year w^e investigated 324 applications for 
release, with the result that 185 children were returned to their 
homes. Seventy-four of these were released conditionally or 
on parole, our supervision not being relinquished, and 139 
cases refused; 89 applications are now awaiting investigation. 



Investigating Department. 

The year has been one of serious financial depression, and 
though there has been no appreciable increase in the number 
of applications received by the investigating department, the 
disposition of cases has been much more difficult. In conse- 
quence, the number of children received shows a considerable 
excess over the past year. 

One especial type of case has been so common as to be 
worthy of mention, viz., the foreign-born widower, by occu- 
pation an unskilled laborer, left with several small children.. 
Unemployment and the lack of funds to pay for support make 
it impossible to get relatives or friends to help out. This sort 
of man, even if employed, cannot afford or even obtain a 
suitable housekeeper, and no other course seems possible than 
for the Board to break up the family, receive the children and 
collect from the father that which he is able to contribute. 

The lack of adequate provision for the care of the mentally 
defective is also responsible for many applications which do not 
properly belong to this department. So far as it is possible, 
these children are left in the community, and the attention of 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 189 

the authorities and the need of more accommodations for 
the feeble-minded emphasized. When this condition is the sole 
cause of forcing an otherwise independent and self-supporting 
family to ask for aid, the only relief is for this Board to re- 
ceive the child as dependent and, obviously, dependency is not 
the real reason for the application. When there is a settlement 
and the local almshouse does not offer proper facilities, for 
cases of this kind the B(5ard receives the child with the under- 
standing that the town of settlement reimburse the actual cost 
of support at the State Infirmary. 

The following statistics are self-explanatory: — 

Statistics of Investigating Department. 
Applications (chapter 83, section 36, Revised Laws) pend- 
ing December 1, 1914 436 

New applications (chapter 83, section 36, Revised Laws) 1,337 



1,773 



Disposition as follows : — 

Applications withdrawn 100 

Assumed by relatives 374 

Assumed by public agencies : — 

Mothers' aid (4 families) 12 

Other public agencies 371 

Assumed by private agencies 253 

Received (chapter 83, section 36, Revised Laws) . . 305 

Received (chapter 83, section 13, Revised Laws) . . 1 
Pending December 1, 1915 . . . . . . .357 

Applications for discharge pending December 1, 1914 . . 88 

New apphcations December 1, 1914, to December 1, 1915 . 46 

Disposition as follows : — 

Discharged 48 

Discharge refused 13 

Applications withdrawn 55 

Pending December 1, 1915 18 

After-care. 

Pending December 1, 1914 . 54 

New cases December 1, 1914, to December 1, 1915 . . 83 

Closed 84 

Pending December 1, 1915 . . . . . . . .53 



1,773 



134 



134 



137 



137 



190 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Support. 

As in past years, every effort has been made to place as 
much responsibility for support on the parents as possible. 
Regular payments, even though small, are urged, and the 
investigators endeavor to keep in touch with the families to 
see that these payments are kept up. During the year, from 
parents and relatives, $2,904.64 has been received. 

In the case of settled children such arrangements are made 
between the relatives and the overseers of the poor, and no 
child with a legal residence in the State is received under 
section 36, chapter 83 of the Revised Laws without written 
agreements from the overseers to reimburse the Board for 
partial support. The amount received towards the support of 
settled children during the year was $16,943.09. 

A better understanding by public officials of the differentia- 
tion between dependency and neglect has been furthered by 
an important decision rendered by the Supreme Court in the 
case of Commonwealth v. Wm. Dee, reported in 222 Mass. 184. 
This decision in effect precludes the bringing of a child into 
court on a complaint under the "neglect" law (Acts of 1903, 
chapter 334; Acts of 1909, chapter 181) unless it can be shown 
that the parents are unfit to have custody. In the Dee case 
a three-year-old child, whose mother was a widow with a baby, 
w^as committed to the State Board as dependent upon public 
charity by reason of the neglect of his parents, the sole reason, 
as later found by the court, being that the mother was too 
poor to support both children. The court held that the de- 
pendence upon public charity alleged in the complaint must 
have been caused not by the poverty of the mother, but by 
her neglect; and that the Legislature used the term "neglect" 
in a sense which imports some kind of culpability on the part 
of the parent. 

This decision will tend to prevent the breaking up of families 
by court order for poverty only, and will afford strong encour- 
agement to the preservation of the family intact where tem- 
porary assistance from local relief officials would meet the 
emergency. The complete decision is as follows : — 



Part I.l GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 191 



Commonwealth v. William Dee. 

Complaint, received and sworn to in the Central District Court 
of Worcester on May 15, 1912, under St. 1903, c. 334, as amended 
by St. 1909, c. 181, by the clerk of the overseers of the poor of 
the city of Worcester, charging that the defendant, a boy under 
sixteen years of age, by reason of the neglect of his parents, was 
dependent upon public charity, and praying that he might be 
dealt with according to law. 

The Central District Court of Worcester found that the de- 
fendant was a neglected child and ordered that he be committed 
to the State Board of Charity. That Board, in behalf of the 
defendant, appealed from the order of the Superior Court under 
St. 1903, c. 334, § 6. 

In the Superior Court the case was heard by Aiken, C.J., who 
found the facts which are stated in the opinion. He found that 
the defendant was not a neglected child within the meaning of 
the statute, and ordered that the complaint be dismissed. There- 
upon the chief justice reported the case for determination by 
this court. If the finding was in accordance with St. 1903, c. 
334, as amended by St. 1909, c. 181, the finding and the order 
dismissing the complaint were to be affirmed; otherwise, the 
order of the Central District Court of Worcester, committing 
the defendant to the custody of the State Board of Charity, was 
to be affirmed, or such other order was to be made as should 
be made. 

E. R. Sparroiv (H. C. Attwill, Attorney-General, with him on 
the brief), for the defendant and the State Board of Charity. 

E. H. Vanghan, for the Commonwealth, submitted a brief. 

DeCourcy, J. In January, 1912, a widow with two children, 
one of them twenty-one months and the other (this defendant) 
between three and four years old, after earnest but unavailing 
effort to get emploj-ment applied for aid to the overseers of the 
poor of Worcester. Thereupon they were placed in the alms- 
house until April, when a position was secured in a family for 
the mother with the younger child. Before January, 1912, she 
always had supported the children by doing work, and the chief 
justice of the Superior Court, in the trial of the present com- 
plaint, found that until going to the almshouse the defendant 
"was properly clothed and fed by the mother, and affectionately 
cared for, and there was nothing in the case to indicate that the 
child suffered by reason of any failure on the part of the mother 
to do what a mother should." 

The question raised by the report is whether the finding of 
the court, that the defendant was not a neglected child, was in 
accordance with St. 1903, c. 334, as amended by St. 1909, c. 



192 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

181. The first section of the statute, so far as material to the 
present inquiry, reads as follows: — 

Section 1. A police, district or municipal court or a trial justice, 
upon a complaint made by any person that any child under sixteen years 
of age within its or his jurisdiction, by reason of orphanage or of the neg- 
lect, crime, crueltj", insanity or drunkenness, or other vice of its parents, is 
growing up without education or without salutarj^ control, or without 
proper physical care, or in circumstances exposing him to lead an idle and 
dissolute life, or is dependent upon public charity, may issue a precept 
to bring such cliild before said court or trial justice, and shall issue a 
notice to the state board of charity and shall also issue a summons re- 
quiring the board or person to whom such notice or summons is directed 
to appear before said court or trial justice at the time and place stated in 
the notice and summons, to show cause why such child should not be 
committed to the state board of charity, or be otherwise provided for. 

The complaint alleges that William Dee, "by reason of the 
neglect of his parents, is dependent upon public charity." The 
complainant recognizes that mere dependence upon public charity 
does not bring a child within the operation of the statute, but 
that it must further appear that such dependence was caused 
by "the neglect, crime, cruelty, insanity or drunkenness, or other 
vice of its parents." It does contend, however, that the de- 
fendant's dependence upon public charity, show^n to exist in this 
case, was due to his mother's "neglect," when she in fact failed 
to support him, regardless of whether her failure was wilful and 
intentional or was due to inability on account of her poverty. 

If the word "neglect" were the exact symbol of an unchange- 
able idea, the meaning of the statute would be too clear for con- 
troversy. But this word, like very many in the language, is sus- 
ceptible of a variety of significations. This is apparent not only 
from the definitions in the standard dictionaries, but from the 
decisions of various courts, w^here it has been necessary to con- 
sider the sense in which the word was used in different statutes. 
(See 5 Words and Phrases, 4740; 3 Words and Phrases (2d 
series), 551, and cases cited.) Its meaning in the statute under 
consideration must be determined by examining the context, and 
the history and purpose of this "neglect" law. 

It seems plain from the entire text that the Legislature used 
the word in the sense which imports some kind of culpability in 
the conduct of, or at least an intentional nonperformance of 
duty by, the parent from whose custody the child is to be taken. 
"Neglect" is used in connection with "crime, cruelty, insanity 
or drunkenness, or other vice" on the part of the parents, and 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 193 

"insanity" was not embodied in the original act. Xoscitur a 
sociis. 

The history of the statute confirms this view. The language 
above quoted, as to what children may be committed, is sub- 
stantially the same as that of the original enactment (St. 1866, 
c. 2S3), except that the clause "or is dependent upon public 
charity" was first embodied in the law by St. 1SS2, c. 181. (See 
Sts. 1898, c. 496, § 35; 1900, c. 397, § 2.) In the original act 
it was provided that the child might be restored to its parents 
whenever it should be satisfactorily proved that they "shall have 
reformed and are leading orderly and industrious lives, and are 
in a condition to exercise salutary parental control over their 
children, and to provide them with proper education and em- 
ployment." (St. 1866, c. 283, § 4.) This provision was con- 
tinued in the Pub. Sts., c. 48, § 21, and appears again in St. 
1894, c. 498, § 29. It strongly indicates that the purpose of the 
"neglect law," as it usually is designated, was to provide for the 
removal of children from those parents who are undesirable and 
unfit, and not from parents who are merely poor; and while the 
clause in controversy has not been before this court for inter- 
pretation, this statute was involved in the case of Purinton v. 
Jamrock, 195 Mass. 187, and the following language in the 
opinion by Sheldon, J., is significant: — 

The ven.' complaint upon wliich the adjudication was made charges not 
the poverty of the mother, but her "neglect, crime, drunkenness or other 
vice." It rested upon what must now be taken to have been her " volun- 
tary acts and omissions" (at page 199). And again (at page 201): "Xor 
has this mother been discriminated against by reason of her poverty. It 
appears that she was employed in a cotton mill; and there is nothing to 
overcome the presumption that she was able to support her child. The 
custody of her child was taken from her by reason of her misconduct." 

If further confirmation were needed for our interpretation of 
the word "neglect," it would be found in the distinction long 
recognized by the Legislature in its classification and treatment 
between pauper or dependent children on the one hand and 
neglected children on the other. The original of this very stat- 
ute was entitled "An Act relating to indigent and neglected chil- 
dren." (St. 1882, c. 181.) While the third section provided for 
the commitment of neglected children, using the word in the 
same sense as in the present statute, the second section dealt 
with poor and indigent children, and it is to be noted that under 
its provisions "neglected" children were to be committed by 
order of the court, while the State Board was authorized to 
commit pauper children. The same distinction appears in St. 



194 STATE BO.\RD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

1900, c. 397, § 1, providing for children dependent upon public 
charity, and § 2 (as subsequently amended), being the neglect 
law now under consideration. Later we find the same distinction 
embodied in R. L., c. 83, §§ 36, 37, respectively. The provisions 
for the care of "pauper children" now appears as St. 1911, c. 
490, § 2, while that with reference to "neglected children" is 
St. 1909, c. 181, here in question. 

And this differentiation in classification and treatment be- 
tween destitute or dependent children and those who are neg- 
lected or are delinquent or wayward is but a recognition of the 
fundamental difference in fact. Whether considered from the 
standpoint of the dependent child, or of the parent entitled to 
its custody and care, but temporarily and unavoidably disabled 
from providing for its support, a grave injustice would be done to 
such innocent victims of poverty by bringing them into court with 
its stigma of criminality. (See, as to delinquent and wayward 
children, St. 1906, c. 413; and as to truants, R. L., c. 46, § 11.) 

The facts here disclosed present a case for relief by public 
agencies. It is not for us to suggest what provisions of the 
statutes were applicable to these facts, as that question is not 
before us for determination. In accordance with the report, the 
finding for the defendant and the order dismissing the complaint 
must be affirmed. 

So ordered. 

Nonsupport Proceedings . 

During the year ending November 30, 1915, the sum of 
84,862.83 was collected from parents of children or other rela- 
tives by means of court proceedings brought under Acts of 
1911, chapter 456, known as the "uniform desertions act", or 
through agreement entered into with the parents to avoid court 
action. To compel parents to assist the Board in supporting 
their children results often in a reformation of the parents 
and the return of the children to the home, with a consequent 
saving to the State. 

This amount is in addition to the sum mentioned in the 
section entitled "Support", and represents the amount obtained 
by the special agent of the Board. 

Adoptions. 
At the beginning of the year there were 21 applications for 
children for adoption awaiting investigation. During the year 
162 new applications have been received. Twenty-eight appli- 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 195 

cations have been withdrawn, 18 disapproved without investi- 
gation and 118 investigated. Of this number, 39 have been 
disapproved and 79 approved, and there are now 19 applica- 
tions awaiting investigation. In the 79 homes approved, 60 
children have been placed. 

Seventy children have been adopted during the year, 56 
girls and 14 boys, the oldest child adopted being a girl eighteen 
years of age and the youngest a girl nineteen months old. 
There are now 72 children on trial for adoption. 

Of the applications received, one came from Quebec, one 
from Xew Jersey, and all others from New England, one being 
from Rhode Island, one from Connecticut and one from Xew 
Hampshire. 



196 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



197 



Summary of Children under Three Years of Age in Custody of the Board. 





D 


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EGLECTED 




Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


Number December 1, 1914 .... 

Received December 1, 1914, to November 30, 
1915. 


156 
113 


122 
110 


278 
223 


48 
30 


50 

38 


98 
68 


Total number in charge 

Number transferred to the Department for 

Children over three years of age. 
Number discharged 


269 
61 
40 


232 
56 

28 


501 
117 

68 


78 

29 

6 


88 
27 
12 


166 
56 
18 


Number December 1, 1915 .... 


168 


148 


316 


43 


49 


92 



198 



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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



199 



Disposition of Children over Three Years of Age in Custody of the Board 
during the Year ending November 30, 1915. 





Girls 


Boys 


In homes, receiving wages 

In homes, free of expense to State 

In homes, clothing only pro\-ided 

In homes, board and clothing provided 

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Married 

To United States service 

Whereabouts unknown 


281 

184 

89 

1,429 

247 

13 

36 


429 

410 

40 

2,009 

224 

6 

6 

127 


Total number in charge November 30, 1915 .... 

Died 

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9 

73 

50 
45 


3,251 

18 

83 

23 

5 

10 
271 


Total number in custody of the Board during the ofl&cial year 


2,457 


3,661 



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25 


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200 



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Part I. 



GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



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202 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Disposition of Children held in Custody of the Board on Temporary Mittimi, 
pending Further Order of the Court. 





Pending 
Decem- 
ber 1, 
1914 


Re- 
ceived 
dxiring 

the 
Year 


Perma- 
nently 
com- 
mitted 


Bailed 
or sur- 
rendered 
to 
Court 


Sent to 
Indus- 
trial 
Schools 


Died 


Pending 
Decem- 
ber 1. 
1915 


Neglected 
Delinquent 
Wayward . 


37 
11 


.12 
107 

8 


38 
15 

4 


73 
77 
2 


19 

1 


1 


37 

1 


Totals . 


48 


227 


57 


152 


20 


I j 4. 



Localities from which New Children were received. 













Neg- 
lected 


Delin- 
quent 


Wayward 


Under Revised Laws, 
Chapter 83 




c 
c 

i 
1 


>> 

1 


1 


1 

a 

1 


c 
o 

I 


1 

1 


C 

.2 

1 


G 

.s 

"S 




a 
.2 

1 


Abington 

Acton . 

Adams . 

Amesbury 

Arlington 

Athol . 

Attleboro 

Barnstable 

Beverly . 

Boston . 

Bourne . 

Bridgewater 

Brockton 

Cambridge 

Carver . 

Chelmsford 

Chelsea . 

Chicopee 

Dedham 

Dracut . 

Egremont 

Fall River 

Fitchburg 

Foxborough 

Framingham 

Franklin 

Gardner 

Gloucester 

Great Barring 

Greenfield 

Hanover 

Harwich 

Haverhill 

Hingham 

Holyoke 

Ipswich 

Lakeville 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Lexington 

Lowell . 

Ludlow 

Lynn 


;ton 








6 

3 
2 
4 
2 
3 
1 
2 
17 

10 
4 

1 

2 
2 

1 
8 
5 
2 
4 
6 

4 

8 

1 
9 
7 
2 
2 
1 
12 
1 

5 

11 


62 

1 

1 
2 

4 

1 

- 
_ 


11 

8 

1 

1 


73 

8 
12 

- 

2 

1 
1 


1 

2 


7 
1 


1 


1 

- 

41 

1 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
3 

2 

2 

1 

- 

I 

5 


1 

4 

~ 

I 
_ 

_ 
- 


2 

3 

2 
153 

7 
3 

t 

1 
9 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 
2 
1 

5 

1 
10 

1 
10 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



203 



Localities from which Xeic Children were received — Concluded. 





j Neg- 
lected 


Delix- 

QUEXT 


V.'aywahd 


UxDEP. Revised 
Chapter S3 


Laws, 




c 
1 


1 


! i 

' 1 


Temporary 
I'ermanont, 


Temporary 
Section 13 
Section 20 




9 
'T, 


Maiden . 

Marlborough 

Mavnard 

Mediord 

Melrose . 

Methuen 

Middleboroug 

Mihord . 

Millburj- ' 

Natick . 

Needham 

New Bedford 

Newburj-pKjrt 

Newton 

North Adams 

Northampton 

Norton . 

Norwood 

Orange . 

Peabody 

Pelham . 

Pittsfield 

Pl\-mpton 

Pro%-incetown 

Quincy . 

Raynham 

Reading 

Revere . 

Rochester 

Rockland 

Salem . 

Sandisfield 

Sandwich 

Saugus . 

Sharon . 

Sherbom 

Shirley . 

Shrewsbury- 

Somer\-ille 

Southbridge 

Springfield 

Stoneham 

Sutton . 

Taunton 

Templeton 

Tewksbury 

Wakefield 

Waltham 

Ware 

Warren . 

Watertown 

WeUesley 

Westborough 

Westfield 

West Xewbui 

West Stockbr 

We\-mouth 

Whitman 

Williamsburg 

William stown 

Wilmington 

Winchester 

Woburn 

Worcester 

Yarmouth 


h 

fdge 






i I 

1 

3 
3 

19 
3 
3 

13 

2 
i 

1 

15 

1 

4 
1 

2 
6 
5 

4 

1 

6 

5 
2 

] 

1 
2 
2 

24 


8 

7 
5 

i 

C 

2 
2 

1 
2 

1 


I 

_ 

I 

1 
2 

2 

1 

4 

1 

1 
5 

' 1 


4 

1 
1 

I 

- 
2 


_ 

1 

i - 

1 


_ 

: 

I 

_ 

_ 


- 
- 

: 

- 
- 
_ 

- 

_ 

1 I 

\ ~ 


5 
1 

2 

i 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

~ 

14 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
5 


5 

- 
3 


3 

1 
7 
1 
4 

1 
8 
3 

2 

2 

1 
1 
2 
2 

1 
1 

1 

4 

1 

17 

1 

1 

1 
1 
2 

8 


Totals . . . . 


306 


112 


41 


1 ''' 


4 


1 5 


1 


111 


13 


305 



204 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Licensed Boarding Houses for Infants. 

During the last official year 388 licenses to maintain boarding 
houses for infants were granted by the Board under the pro- 
visions of section 2, chapter 83, Revised Laws, in 63 cities and 
towns, in addition to the 360 licenses in force at the expiration 
of the previous year; 326 licenses expired, by the one-year 
limitation; 62 were revoked, 58 on account of change of resi- 
dence, 2 for neglect of infants and 2 by death; and 360 licenses, 
permitting the boarding of 754 infants in 63 cities and towns, 
remained in force November 30, 1915. These represent the 
licensed homes not only of infants supported by the Com.- 
monwealth, but of those placed out by parents and many 
private agencies. 

The following table shows the number of licenses issued, the 
number of cities and towns where licensees reside, the number 
of licenses expired and revoked, the whole number in force, 
etc., for the year ending November 30, 1915, and twenty-three 
preceding years : — 



Year ending 


T3 

§ 

s 




-a 
£ 
'5. 

X 


1 

> 


8 

C3 




> 




1 


September 30 








>- 






2 


o 


























M 


^ 


rn 


m 


M 


ft! 


■g 


^ 


-2 




f3 


S 


a 


r* 


a 


a 


Q 


C 


^ 












o 




























>^ 


^ 


^ 


►J 


-a 


;3 


« 




hH 


1892 


127 


34 


- 


5 


122 


9 


972 


398 


272 


1893 


199 


39 


155 


16 


139 


20 


1,800 


768 


374 


1894 


173 


42 


120 


32 


159 


49 


2,997 


1,156 


382 


1895 


182 


50 


134 


52 


155 


68 


2,701 


1,125 


429 


1896 


154 


39 


135 


32 


142 


57 


2,972 


1,235 


483 


1897 


189 


43 


123 


42 


166 


38 


3,343 


1,376 


549 


1898 . . . . . 


209 


43 


150 


48 


177 


25 


3,075 


1,355 


630 


1899 


222 


43 


155 


60 


184 


43 


3,269 


1,347 


513 


1900 


228 


41 


157 


59 


196 


19 


3,117 


1,337 


528 


1901 


258 


44 


174 


52 


228 


23 


3,525 


1,395 


601 


1902 


271 


48 


191 


58 


250 


8 


3,176 


1,384 


557 


1903 


253 


47 


221 


62 


220 


12 


3,111 


1,319 


572 


1904 


276 


48 


197 


43 


256 


24 


3,751 


1,543 


685 


1905 


285 


47 


236 


43 


262 


7 


3,737 


1,704 


674 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



205 









? 


1 


, 


, 


1 


c 
1 


"H 


Year endixg 


S 


H 

"S 


a 


> 


^ 








« 


November 30 




8 




1 






OQ 


i 


2 






c 




c 








c 


c 




?^ 




fi 


8 


g 


§ 


O 


a 


^ 






z 


•"^ 


'►J 


^ 


^ 


:i 


^ 


- 


1906 


400 


51 


295 


66 


301 


15 


4,926 


1,942 


718 


1907 


373 


56 


271 


62 


341 


10 


4,712 


1,925 


817 


1908 


442 


59 


311 


87 


385 


18 


5,370 


2,215 


896 


1909 


411 


62 


351 


70 


375 


20 


4,642 


2,272 


880 


1910 


410 


60 


350 


64 


371 


30 


4,459 


2,099 


800 


1911 


362 


64 


350 


39 


344 


17 


4,025 


2,078 


790 


1912 


373 


68 


308 


60 


349 


23 


4,622 


2,103 


891 


1913 


405 


64 


323 


48 


383 


24 


5,047 


2,263 


963 


1914 


391 


61 


358 


56 


360 


33 


4,923 


2,136 


934 


1915 


388 


63 


326 


62 


360 


48 


4,928 


2,212 


916 



The State nurses have visited 1,616 infants, under the super- 
vision of societies and private parties. 



206 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Ci 



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Part LI GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



207 



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MasHachuseits Parole Department 

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Hampden County Children'H Aid Society . 

Salvation Army lloscuo League . 

OvcrHeor,s of the poor of Lynn 

Door of Hope, Worcester .... 

Ovornccrs of the poor of Beverly 





210 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 






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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



211 



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212 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 






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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 213 



Licensed Lying-in Hospitals. 

Licenses in force November 30, 1914 (in 78 cities and towns) 181 

Expired during the 3'ear 51 

Surrendered before expiration 9 

Revoked 1 

— 61 

Continuing in force 120 

New issues 38 

Reissues 51 

Licenses in force November 30, 1915 (in 87 cities and tovrns) . . 209 

Licensees November 30, 1915: — 

Corporations 84 

Physicians 39 

Registered nurses 25 

Overseers of the poor 10 

Other persons 51 

Total . 209 



One license was revoked by vote of the Board for violation 
of the regulations for lying-in hospitals. 

One hundred fifty visits of inspection of lying-in hospitals 
were made during the year ending November 30, 1915. 

Special effort is made in inspection work to see that hos- 
pitals keep complete records of their maternity patients. It 
is quite easy for a patient to be admitted to some of the 
larger hospitals under an assumed name, and in consequence 
the birth is reported under that assumed name. Some of the 
progressive hospitals have a social service department to in- 
vestigate all suspicious cases, to see that patients do not conceal 
their identity. 

Rule 8 of the regulations for lying-in hospitals, requiring 'the 
use of 1 per cent solution of silver nitrate or some other prep- 
aration approved by the State Department of Health in the 
eyes of new-born infants for the prevention of ophthalmia 
neonatorum, is uniformly carried out and is producing good 
results. 

Three hundred eighty-five notices of the discharge from 
lying-in hospitals of cases of "sore eyes'' were received during 



214 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

the year in accordance with Rule 9 of the regulations for 
lying-in hospitals. Rule 9 is as follows: — 

A licensee shall send notice in writing to the State Department 
of Health, Boston, within six hours after the discharge from his 
lying-in hospital, of an infant whose eyes show or have shown 
the presence of ophthalmia neonatorum, stating the destination 
of said infant. A duplicate of the notice shall at the same time 
be sent to the State Board of Charity, Boston. 

Most hospitals report, however, any sort of infection in an 
infant's eyes; so the above number of notices does not repre- 
sent positive cases of ophthalmia neonatorum. The purpose 
of these notices is to give the State Department of Health 
immediate notice of the discharge from the various hospitals 
of infants who have or have had "sore eyes," and to enable 
the inspectors of the State Department of Health to follow 
up the cases and see that the treatment is followed out after 
the patients leave the hospital. The 385 notices were received 
from 36 hospitals having a total of 7,080 births per year. These 
figures show that "sore eyes" develop in 5H per cent of the 
births of these hospitals. The following table shows in detail 
the reports received from lying-in hospitals, in accordance with 
Rule 9, for the period from December 1, 1914, to November 30, 
1915: — 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



215 



Total 
Yearly 
Births 


SS. ' o^23§S|?^§|g|S|| 


Prophylactic used in Infant's Eyes at Birth 


Argyrol, 25 per cent 

S. D. II. 1 silver nitrate 

S. D. II. silver nitrate 

S. D. H. silver nitrate and 25 per cent argyrol 

S. D. H. silver nitrate 

S. D. H. silver nitrate 

Argyrol, 10 per cent 

Argyrol, 25 per cent 

S. D. II. silver nitrate 

Argyrol, 20 per cent 

S. D. II. silver nitrate 

S. D. H. silver nitrate and argyrol, 25 per cent 

Argyrol, 20 per cent 

Argyrol, 25 per cent 

S. D. II. silver nitrate 

Protargyrol, 20 per cent 

Sophol, 5 per cent 


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Name of Lying-in Hospital 


Boston Lying-in Hospital 

Brockton Hospital 

Gary Hospital 

Clinton Hospital Association • _ i • 
Gushing Hospital, Parker Hill Road, Boston . 
Doylo, M. E., Winthrop Street, Roxbury . 

Fall River City Hospital 

Franklin County Hospital, Greenfield 

Frost Hospital, Chelsea 

Goddard Hospital, Brockton 

Haverhill City Hospital 

Holyoke City Hospital 

House of Mercy Hospital, Springfield 

Lawrence General Hospital 

Long Island Hospital, Boston 

Lowell Corporation Hospital 

Lowell General Hospital ...... 

Lynn Hospital . 



216 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



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II 



Part LI GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



217 



Tuition of Children under the Care and Control of the 

Board. 

Section 4 of chapter 44 of the Revised Laws provides that, 
"For the tuition in the public schools in any city or town of a 
child between the ages of five and fifteen years who shall be 
placed elsewhere than in his own home by the state board of 
charity ... or kept under the control of . . . said board in 
said city or town, the commonwealth shall pay to said city or 
towm . . . fifty cents for each week of five days, or major part 
thereof, of attendance of every such child in the public schools, 
or, if the school committee of said city or town so desires, an 
amount equal to the average expense for each pupil of such 
school during the preceding year, for a period equal to the 
time during which the child so attends. For the transportation 
to and from a public school of any child whose tuition is pay- 
able by the commonwealth . . . the commonwealth . . . shall 
pay to the city or town furnishing such transportation, for each 
week of five days or major part thereof, an amount equal to 
the average amount for each child paid by said city or town 
per week for the transportation of children to and from school 
over the route by which such child is conveyed." 

Under the operation of this law bills received from 228 cities 
and towns for the tuition and transportation of 2,952 children, 
amounting to 848,257.19, — viz., schooling, $44,228.91; trans- 
portation, $4,028.28, — were audited by the Board and paid 
by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth during the last ofiicial 
year, as follows : — 





Number 


Number of 


Cost of 
Schooling 


Cost of 




Cities and Towns 


of 


Weeks' 


Transpor- 


Total Cost 




Children 


Schooling 


tation 




Abington 


8 


169 


S84 50 


•548 00 


$132 50 


Acton . 












7 


146 


73 00 


85 60 


158 60 


Agawam 












1 


9 


4 .50 




4 50 


Amesbury 












21 


447 


339 29 


55 25 


394 54 


Amherst 












26 


672 


336 00 


25 90 


361 90 


Andover 












13 


444 


222 00 


38 50 


260 50 


Arlington 












19 


701 


350 50 




350 50 


Ashfield 












9 


177 


186 66 


_ 


186 66 


Ashland 












6 


228 


114 00 


22 80 


136 80 


Athol . 












34 


1,041 


520 50 


78 50 


599 00 


Attleboro 












1 


39 


29 25 




29 25 


Avon . 















14 


7 00 


_ 


7 00 


Ayer . 












4 


116 


58 00 


29 00 


87 00 



218 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1' 





Number 


Number of 


Cost of 

Schooling 


Cost of 




Cities and Towns 


of 
Children 


Weeks- 
Schooling 


Transpor- 
tation 


Total Cost 


Barre 


5 


163 


$S1 50 




881 50 


Becket 








7 


192 


96 00 


- 


96 00 


Bedford 








2 


77 


38 50 


_ 


38 50 


Belchertown 








26 


762 


381 00 


- 


381 00 


Bellingham . 








4 


86 


43 00 


$17 50 


60 50 


Belmont 








5 


95 


69 94 


_ 


69 94 


Berkley 








16 


348 


174 00 


- 


174 00 


Berlin . 








9 


181 


90 50 


25 


90 75 


Bernardston 








3 


107 


53 50 




53 50 


Beverly 








28 


597 


298 50 


- 


298 50 


Blandford . 








7 


233 


116 50 


- 


116 59 


Boston 








156 


3,843 


3,862 16 


- 


3.862 16 


Braintree . 








12 


306 


153 00 


_ 


153 00 


Brewster 








4 


113 


113 00 


56 50 


169 50 


Bridgewater 








7 


182 


91 00 


28 00 


119 00 


Brimfield . 








15 


475 


361 77 


179 00 


540 77 


Brockton 








35 


909 


454 50 


- 


454 50 


Brookfield . 








10 


241 


120 50 


_ 


120 50 


Buckland 








3 


51 


25 50 


- 


25 50 


Cambridge . 








75 


2,099 


1,049 50 


- 


1,049 50 


Canton 








11 


254 


127 00 


- 


127 00 


Carlisle 








7 


166 


83 00 


83 00 


166 00 


Charlemont 








7 


173 


86 50 


- 


86 50 


Charlton 








5 


129 


64 50 


- 


64 50 


Chatham 








4 


130 


130 00 


- 


130 00 


Chelmsford 








11 


275 


137 50 


3 00 


140 50 


Chelsea 








8 


258 


129 00 


- 


129 00 


Cheshire 








2 


8 


4 00 


_ 


4 00 


Chester 








13 


339 


169 50 


- 


169 50 


Chesterfield 








8 


138 


125 43 


- 


125 43 


Chicopee 








15 


280 


140 00 


2 00 


142 00 


Clinton 








2 


64 


32 00 




32 00 


Cohasset 








1 


27 


13 50 


_ 


13 50 


Colrain 








13 


335 


167 50 


- 


167 50 


Concord 








2 


78 


70 77 


40 95 


111 72 


Conway 








20 


364 


182 00 




182 00 


Cummington 








19 


532 


573 84 


82 00 


655 84 


Dalton 








8 


110 


55 00 


- 


55 00 


Dana . 








1 


26 


13 00 


- 


13 00 


Danvers 








15 


495 


247 50 


- 


247 50 


Dedham 








24 


604 


524 16 


_ 


524 16 


Deerfield 








3 


84 


42 00 


- 


42 00 


Dennis 








2 


25 


25 00 


_ 


25 00 


Dighton 








4 


115 


57 50 


- 


57 50 


Douglas 








6 


216 


108 00 


- 


108 00 


Dover . 








1 


38 


46 53 


19 00 


65 53 


Dracut 








14 


501 


250 50 


44 00 


294 50 


Dudley 








5 


134 


67 00 


- 


67 00 


Duxbury 








6 


215 


107 50 


17 50 


125 00 


East Bridgewater 






14 


405 


202 50 


22 00 


224 50 


East Longmeadow 






10 


186 


224 27 


5 50 


90Q 77 


Easton 






10 


251 


125 50 


- 


125 50 


Enfield 








52 


1,372 


686 00 


30 50 


716 50 


Essex . 








3 


108 


54 00 


14 40 


68 40 


Everett 








17 


383 


191 50 


- 


191 50 


Falmouth . 








3 


128 


64 00 


128 00 


192 00 


Fitchburg . 








9 


217 


108 59 


43 75 


152 25 


Foxborough 








12 


369 


1S4 50 


6 00 


190 50 


Framingham 








52 


1,241 


620 50 


- 


620 50 


Franklin 








17 


456 


228 00 


- 


228 00 


Gardner 








9 


216 


lOS 00 


- 


108 00 


Georgetown 








30 


747 


485 55 


447 11 


932 66 


Gill 








15 


392 


196 00 


- 


196 00 


Gloucester . 








6 


92 


46 00 


- 


46 00 


Goshen 








4 


92 


81 88 


_ 


81 88 


Granby 








9 


185 


92 50 


71 55 


164 05 


Granville . 








1 


16 


8 00 


- 


8 00 


Greenfield . 








13 


338 


169 00 


- 


169 00 


Greenwich . 








5 


152 


76 00 


76 00 


152 00 


Grot on 








3 


113 


56 50 


- 


56 50 


Hamilton 








1 


35 


17 50 


- 


17 50 


Hampden . 








15 


369 


184 50 


- 


184 50 


Hanover 








6 


162 


81 00 


35 25 


116 25 


Hardwick . 








3 


114 


57 00 


57 00 


114 00 


Harwich 








6 


150 


150 00 


- 


150 00 


Haverhill . 








13 


330 


165 00 


- 


165 09 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



219 





Number 


Number of 


Cost of 
Schooling 


Cost of 




Cities axd Towns 


of 
Children 


Weeks' 
Schooling 


Transpor- 
tation 


Total Cost 


Hawley 


26 


603 


$301 50 




$301 50 


Hinsdale 








16 


448 


477 32 


_ 


477 32 


Holbrook . 








6 


125 


62 50 


_ 


62 50 


Holland 








5 


115 


57 50 


_ 


57 50 


HoUiston 








11 


372 


186 00 


_ 


1S6 00 


Hopkinton . 








37 


1,116 


558 00 


S197 80 


755 80 


Huntington 








6 


93 


46 50 


- 


46 50 


Ipswich 








1 


28 


14 00 


14 00 


2S 00 


Kingston 








6 


182 


91 00 




91 00 


LawTence 








4 


102 


77 74 


_ 


77 74 


Leominster . 








8 


214 


107 00 


4 00 


111 00 


Leveret t 








3 


82 


41 00 


- 


41 00 


Lexington 








10 


279 


139 50 




139 50 


Leyden 








10 


279 


139 50 


_ 


139 50 


Ludlow 








11 


264 


132 00 


70 19 


202 19 


Lunenburg . 








2 


72 


36 00 




36 00 


Lynn . 








43 


926 


463 00 


9 00 


472 00 


Lynnfield . 








4 


134 


67 00 


4 00 


71 00 


Maiden 








44 


849 


424 50 


_ 


424 50 


Mansfield . 








4 


83 


41 50 


_ 


41 50 


Marion 








4 


130 


131 10 


_ 


131 10 


Marlborough 








19 


471 


367 51 


32 25 


399 76 


Medfield 








6 


183 


91 50 


17 55 


109 05 


Medford . 








66 


1,752 


876 00 




876 00 


Medway 








22 


676 


338 00 


178 50 


516 50 


Melrose 








36 


575 


504 55 


_ 


504 55 


Mendon 








4 


128 


64 00 


32 00 


96 00 


Merrimac 








11 


211 


105 50 


16 75 


122 25 


Methuen 








4 


107 


53 50 




53 50 


Middleborough 








48 


1,124 


562 00 


8 35 


570 35 


Middlefield . 








14 


255 


127 50 




127 50 


Middleton . 








5 


156 


78 00 


4 40 


82 40 


Miliord 








26 


743 


371 50 




371 50 


Millbury . 








1 


65 


32 50 


_ 


32 50 


Monson 








27 


631 


664 33 


37 75 


702 OS 


Montague . 








5 


130 


65 00 




65 00 


Nahant 








1 


18 


9 00 


_ 


9 00 


Natick 








41 


1,384 


692 00 


8 50 


700 50 


Needham . 








5 


97 


48 50 




48 50 


New Bedford 








4 


114 


57 00 


_ 


57 00 


New Salem . 








12 


301 


150 50 


_ 


150 50 


Newbury 








15 


332 


166 00 


17 25 


183 25 


Newburyport 








8 


230 


115 00 


20 00 


135 00 


Newton 








26 


635 


317 50 




317 50 


North Adams 








2 


35 


17 50 


_ 


17 50 


North Attleboroufeh 






4 


131 


65 50 


_ 


65 50 


North Brookfield 






16 


448 


224 00 


_ 


224 00 


North Reading . 






1 


21 


10 50 


5 25 


15 75 


Northampton 








6 


180 


90 00 




90 00 


Northbridge 








5 




38 50 


_ 


38 50 


Northfield . 








1 


86 


43 00 


_ 


43 00 


Norton 








14 


419 


209 50 


70 50 


280 00 


Norwell 








21 


548 


274 00 


130 00 


404 00 


Norwood 








14 


434 


322 97 


47 23 


370 20 


Oakham 








2 


34 


17 00 




17 00 


Orange 








19 


441 


220 50 


68 00 


288 50 


Oxford 








23 


612 


306 00 


85 00 


391 00 


Palmer 








32 


966 


483 00 


88 75 


571 75 


Peabody 








22 


544 


277 00 


21 75 


298 75 


Pelham 








25 


661 


330 50 




330 50 


Pembroke . 








29 


513 


256 50 


_ 


256 50 


Peru 








7 


97 


197 88 


_ 


197 88 


Phillipston . 








2 


61 


30 50 


_ 


30 50 


Pittsfield . 








6 


171 


85 50 


_ 


85 50 


Plainfield . 








8 


208 


330 71 


_ 


330 71 


Plympton . 








2 


74 


37 00 


_ 


37 00 


Prescott 








27 


673 


336 50 


9 00 


345 50 


Quincy 








34 


835 


417 50 




417 50 


Randolph . 








24 


593 


296 50 


» _ 


296 50 


Raynham . 








3 


42 


21 00 


_ 


21 00 


Reading 








9 


251 


125 50 


5 00 


130 50 


Rehoboth . 








11 


308 


154 00 




154 00 


Revere 








11 


223 


111 50 


_ 


111 50 


Rockland . 








9 


180 


90 00 


_ 


90 00 


Rowe . 








14 


274 


137 00 


_ 


137 00 


Royalston . 








16 


452 


226 00 


- 


226 00 



220 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 





Number 


Number of 


Cost of 
Schooling 


Cost of 




Cities and Towns 


of 
Children 


Weeks' 
Schooling 


Transpor- 
tation 


Total Cost 


Russell 


1 


29 


$14 50 




$14 50 


Rutland 










9 


211 


105 50 


$129 11 


234 61 


Salem . 










7 


164 


82 00 


24 00 


106 00 


Salisbury . 










5 


119 


59 50 




59 50 


Sandwich . 










6 


165 


82 50 


■ _ 


82 50 


Saugus 










27 


745 


529 07 


1 50 


530 57 


Savoy . 










2 


61 


30 50 




30 50 


Seekonk 










4 


144 


72 00 


_ 


72 00 


Sharon 










4 


75 


37 50 


18 75 


56 25 


Shelburne . 










3 


86 


43 00 


19 00 


62 00 


Sherborn 










5 


78 


39 00 




39 00 


Shirley 










3 


85 


42 50 


34 00 


76 50 


Shutesbury . 










10 


99 


49 50 


_ 


49 50 


Somerville . 










30 


680 


510 08 


_ 


510 08 


South Hadley 










9 


219 


109 50 


27 50 


137 00 


Southborough 










9 


265 


132 50 


57 30 


189 80 


Springfield . 










17 


324 


162 00 




162 00 


Sterling 










1 


12 


6 00 


_ 


6 00 


Stoneham . 










16 


272 


136 00 


- 


136 00 


Stoughton . 










18 


537 


268 50 


- 


268 50 


Stow 










2 


44 


22 00 


_ 


22 00 


Sturbridge . 










2 


72 


36 00 


6 25 


42 25 


Sudbury 










1 


20 


10 00 


10 00 


20 00 


Sunderland . 










6 


137 


68 50 


41 10 


109 60 


Sutton 










8 


228 


114 00 




114 00 


Swampscott 










5 


125 


62 50 


- 


62 50 


Taunton 










30 


809 


404 50 


6 00 


410 50 


Templeton . 










11 


281 


140 50 


- 


140 50 


Tewksbury . 










3 


108 


54 00 


- 


54 00 


Topsfield . 










6 


75 


37 50 


- 


37 50 


Townsend 










4 


53 


26 50 


45 05 


71 55 


Tyngsborough 










3 


63 


31 50 




31 50 


Upton . 










9 


232 


116 00 


17 00 


133 00 


Wales . 










3 


72 


36 00 




36 00' 


Walpole 










7 


126 


63 00 


14 25 


77 25 


"Waltham 










10 


277 


296 59 


_ 


296 59 


Ware . 










25 


707 


353 50 


47 75 


401 25 


Wareham 










4 


213 


129 90 


27 00 


156 90 


Warren 










3 


33 


16 50 


18 00 


34 50 


Warwick 










3 


51 


25 50 




25 50 


Washington 










13 


224 


260 56 


- 


260 56 


Watertown . 










35 


831 


656 02 


- 


656 02 


Wayland . 










21 


421 


362 12 


57 00 


419 12 


West Bridgewater 










11 


224 


112 00 


9 50 


121 50 


West Newbury 










11 


264 


132 00 


9 50 


141 50 


Westborough 










10 


246 


123 00 


56 00 


179 00 


Westfield 










17 


397 


198 50 


22 25 


220 75 


Westminster 










15 


426 


213 00 


- 


213 00 


Weston 










12 


356 


456 31 


70 90 


527 21 


Westport 










3 


36 


18 00 




18 00 


Weymouth . 










14 


398 


199 00 


- 


199 00 


Whitman 










37 


863 


431 50 


8 25 


439 75 


Wilbraham . 










19 


320 


160 00 


9 00 


169 00 


Williamsburg 










27 


605 


445 83 


6 75 


452 58 


Williamstown 










8 


256 


300 46 


74 24 


374 70 


Wilmington . 










6 


164 


82 00 


4 25 


86 25 


Winchendon 










14 


352 


176 00 


61 00 


237 00 


Winchester . 










41 


1,233 


616 50 


_ 


616 50 


Woburn 










42 


1,400 


700 00 


- 


700 00 


Worcester 










13 


231 


115 50 


- 


115 50 


Worthington 










8 


125 


146 86 


- 


146 86 


Wrentham . 










1 


38 


19 00 


- 


19 00 


Yarmouth . 










2 


72 


72 00 


- 


72 00 


Totals (228 cities and towns) 


2,952 


74,979 


S44,228 91 


$4,028 28 


$48,257 19 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



221 



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222 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



The expenses for the fiscal year December 1, 1914, to Novem- 
ber 30, 1915, were as follows: — 



Expenses of the Board .... 

Division of State Adult Poor . 

Division of State Minor Wards 

Transportation of State paupers 

Support of indigent and neglected children 

Support of pauper infants 

Tuition of State children .... 

Auxiliary visitors 

Support of sick State paupers . 

Burial of State paupers .... 

Temporary aid of State paupers 

Mothers' aid 

Dangerous diseases . . ... 

Penikese Hospital 

Annual report 



$22,827 36 
78,029 94 
14,574 65 
16,848 15 

522,481 43 

60,770 93 

48,257 19 

248 76 

64,999 83 

6,999 91 

124,989 75- 

249,999 62 

59,999 67 

28,949 98 

2,614 17 



Total $1,382,591 34 



DETAILS. 



EXPENSES OF THE BOARD. 



Salaries: 



Robert W. Kelso, Secretary 

Louise S. Kolb, Assistant to Secretary .... 

Harry H. Pray, Examining Visitor of Institutions 

Amy F. Acton, Chief Inspector of Incorporated Charities 

Caroline J. Cook, Inspector of Incorporated Charities 

Alice M. Mclntire, Inspector of Incorporated Charities 

Marion H. Nay lor. Stenographer 

Isa M. Dempsey, Stenographer 

Augusta Hawley, Chief Accountant 

Jennie I. Gurney, Statistical Clerk 

Mary E. Callahan, Clerk . 

Annie G. Carpenter, Clerk 

Matilda V. Hall, Clerk . 

Florence G. Dickson, Clerk 

Ethel S. Greene, Clerk 

Mary M. Coakley, Clerk . 

Mary B. Crotty, Clerk . 

Ellen A. Flynn, Clerk 

Jeannette H. Mann, Clerk 

Amount carried forward 



$4,000 00 


1,300 00 


2,000 00 


1,600 00 


1,216 67 


1,369 89 


900 00 


739 92 


1,000 00 


750 00 


750 00 


800 00 


750 00 


750 00 


750 00 


182 26 


150 00 


150 00 


100 00 


. $19,258 74 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



223 



Amount brought forward S19,258 74 

Margaret D. MacDonald, Clerk 100 00 

Norah C. McSweeney, Clerk 95 16 

Frances M. Sheehan, Clerk 75 81 

Sara L. Shure, Clerk 125 83 

Total sauries 819,655 54 

Traveling expenses of members 723 44 

Other traveling expenses : 

Robert W. Kelso 8145 09 

Harry H. Pray 248 96 

Amy F. Acton 54 37 

Alice M. Mclntire 64 01 

Caroline J. Cook 112 57 

625 00 

Printing 385 09 

Postage 379 14 

Stationery and office expenses 824 28 

Telephone and telegraph 37 29 

Extra service 29 00 

Assistance 6 18 

Publications 150 65 

Miscellaneous ^. 11 75 

Total 822.827 36 

DIVISION OF STATE ADULT POOR. 

Frank W. Goodhue, Superintendent $2,S75 00 



Subdivision of Indoor Poor 
Frederic L. Kelley, Superintendent's Assistant 
Francis Bardwell, Inspector of Almshouses . 
Edward F. Morgan, Settlement Examiner 
Arthur C. Briggs, Transportation Officer 
George S. Dubois, Transportation Officer 
Clarke S. Gould, Transportation Officer 
Edouard C. Mailloux, Transportation Officer 
Edward H. O'Brien, Transportation Officer . 
William G. Peterson, Transportation Officer 
James H. Quigley, Transportation Officer 
Mary J. Ross, Transportation Officer 
Harry G. Taft, Transportation Officer . 

Amount carried forward .... 



1,818 81 


2,000 00 


1,700 00 


1,000 00 


1,100 00 


520 17 


366 67 


145 75 


55 00 


326 61 


800 00 


366 67 


$13,074 68 



224 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Amount brought forward 813,074 68 

Flora E. Burton, Visitor for Maternity Cases at State 

Infirmary 997 57 

Sabina Marshall, Visitor for Maternity Cases at State 

Infirmary 55 55 

Ruth A. Beebe, Visitor for Maternity Cases at Statb 

Infirmary 777 78 

INIary G. Curmiff, Visitor for Maternity Cases at State 

Infirmary 432 25 

Archie A. Ashley, Visitor 1,500 00 

Roy D. Merchant, Visitor 1,025 00 

Edward J. McDonough, Visitor 1,276 49 

James B. Kerrigan, Stenographer 262 09 

Lauretta M. Moran, Stenographer 750 00 

Lillian Gaffey, Stenographer 750 00 

Arthur L. Stevenson, Clerk 900 00 

Margaret E. O'Connell, Clerk 750 00 

Henry A. Mclntyre, Clerk 437 50 

James J. OToole, Clerk 850 00 



Subdivision of Outdoor Poor. 
George B. Tufts, Deputy Superintendent 
Willard D. Tripp, Visit or-at-large and Examiner 
Ehzabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor of Aid to Dependent 

Mothers 

Edward Hitchcock, INI.D., IMedical Visitor 

Joseph W. Proctor, M.D., Medical Visitor 

Morton E. Cummings, ]\I.D., IMedical Visitor 

G. Arthur Bodwell, Visitor 

Lila C. Crapo, Visitor 

James H. Cunningham, Visitor 

Lilhan F. Foss, Visitor 

John B. Gallagher, Msitor 

Frederick F. Green, Visitor 

William Healey, Visitor 

Henriette M. Heinzen, Visitor 

John W. Henderson, Visitor 

William J. Hinchcliffe, Visitor 

William Hopewell, Visitor 

Louis R. Lipp, Visitor 

Mary A. IMullowney, Visitor 

Margaret A. Murphy, Visitor 

Susana T. O'Connor, Visitor 

Amount carried forward 



2,000 00 


1,800 00 


1,800 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


200 00 


1,200 00 


1,000 00 


1,500 00 


1,000 00 


1,203 89 


1.203 89 


1,500 00 


892 48 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


274 19 


293 01 


666 67 


350.373 04 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 225 

Amount brought forward S50,373 04 

Fred J. Rice, Visitor 1,500 00 

Anna Russell, Visitor , . 1,000 00 

Annie A. McBride, Examiner 1,262 50 

Robina A. Morison, Settlement Clerk 1,100 00 

Justine D. Ferris, Accountant 1,000 00 

Annette E. Barnes, Stenographer and Statistician . . 1,100 00 

Lillian F. Connell, Stenographer 108 07 

Dorothy H. Downey, Stenographer 137 30 

Rose V, Eagan, Stenographer 900 00 

Sophia S. Finklestein. Stenographer 750 00 

May F. Fuller, Stenographer 750 00 

Winifred C. Gilbody, Stenographer 750 00 

Frances Little, Stenographer 62 50 

Joseph P. Mahoney, Stenographer 40 00 

Theresa McDonald, Stenographer 20 00 

Sadie G. Proudman, Stenographer 506 05 

Mary^ C. IMcLain, Clerk . 750 00 

Mary G. Shaughnessey, Clerk 750 00 

Alice C. Taylor, Clerk 560 71 

Alfred B. Greene, Clerk 28 39 

Trueman G. Morison, Clerk 98 63 

Herbert L. Keeble, Clerk 541 66 

Total salaries S64,088 85 

Printing 969 56 

Postage 963 90 

Stationery and office expenses 1,532 08 

Publications 282 62 

Telephone and telegraph 853 66 

Assistance 426 79 

Miscellaneous expenses 265 92 

Traveling expenses: 

Frank W. Goodhue S124 12 

Wilham J. Hinchcliffe 149 52 

Edward F. IMorgan 581 39 

Wilham Hopewell 450 25 

Francis Bardwell 611 37 

Louis R. Lipp . . . . . . . 485 10 

William Healey 555 04 

Joseph W. Proctor 469 63 

Edward Hitchcock 1,199 27 

John W. Henderson 499 35 



Amounts carried forward .... 85,12504 869,38338 



226 STATE BO 


AR] 


3 C 


IF ( 


:m 


.RITY. 


[P. D. 17. 


Amounts brought forward .... $5,125 04 


869,383 38 


Traveling expenses — concluded. 




Archie A. Ashley 228 60 




James H. Cunningham 










. 316 34 




Fred J. Rice 










125 38 




Flora E. Burton . 










75 83 




Henry A. Mclntyre . 










108 36 




Edward J. McDonough 










109 30 




Ruth A. Beebe . 










237 65 




Frederick F. Green . 










96 45 




Lila C. Crapo 










208 80 




John B. Gallagher 










781 91 




Lillian F. Foss . 










78 13 




Anna Russell 










285 63 




G. Arthur Bodwell . 










212 79 




Henriette M. Heinzen 










163 88 




Susana T. O'Connor . 










92 11 




Arthur L. Stevenson . 










48 89 




Elizabeth F. Moloney 










38 43 




Sabina Marshall . 










4 96 




Mary G. Cunniff 










87 05 




Roy D. Merchant 










69 16 




Mary A. Mullowney . 










37 06 




Margaret A. Murphy 










37 18 




Morton E. Cummings, M.D. 








77 63 








8,646 56 




Total 


$78,029 94 


DIVISION OF STATE MINOR WARDS. 




Salaries: 




James E. Fee, Superintendent 












$4,000 00 



Subdivision of Children. 

Winifred A. Keneran, Deputy Superintendent . . . 1,833 33 

Lucy B. Hancock, Visitor-at-large of Boarded Children . 1,100 00 

WiHiam A. Bailey, Visitor 1,200 00 

Ruth A. Baker, Visitor 928 49 

Clifford B. Ballard, Visitor 1,250 00 

Anna H. Bartlett, Visitor 1,000 00 

Metta Bean, Visitor 1,000 00 

Bertha I. Berger, Visitor 845 84 

Roswell D. Blandy, Visitor 1,500 00 

Amount carried forward $14,657 66 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 227 

Amount brought Joncard 814,657 66 

Edward W. Bowker, Visitor 1,500 00 

Emily F. Brennan, Visitor 1,000 00 

Mary R. Cady, Visitor 900 00 

Timothy J. Carey, Visitor 1,500 00 

Florence :M. Carpenter, Visitor 1,000 00 

Nathan Coe. Visitor '. . . . 750 00 

J. Arthur Colburn, Visitor 1,200 00 

Sophia T. Cole, Visitor 920 83 

Katharine C. Collins, Visitor 173 33 

Mary A. Cotter, Visitor 118 28 

Anna F. Craddock, Visitor 847 78 

A. Gertrude Daley, Visitor 733 33 

G. Frederic Davis, Visitor 1,500 00 

Mary T. Dwyer, Visitor • . . 1,000 00 

Henry' L. Gardner, Visitor 1,500 00 

Marion L. Gerould, Visitor 1,000 00 

Joseph W. Grautstuck, Visitor 1,333 34 

Jennie L. Harris, Visitor 1,000 00 

Sarah M. Hayes, Visitor 417 20 

Geraldine S. Jones, Visitor 1,000 00 

Ruth Lissner, Visitor 1,000 00 

Eugenia Locke, Visitor 1,000 00 

Ehzabeth B. Loomis, Visitor 36 56 

H. Gardner Lund, Visitor 600 00 

Emily ^l. :\IacDonald, Visitor 1,000 00 

Gladys G. MacDonald, Visitor 800 00 

Joseph P. :McIntyre, Visitor 1,500 00 

Ehzabeth McKeough, Visitor . 704 30 

Mary F. Mooney, Visitor 1,000 00 

Harriet M. Mulry, Visitor 800 00 

Ehzabeth K. Myles, Visitor 841 67 

Arthur E. Newcomb, Visitor 1,500 00 

Marion G. Noyes, Visitor 435 49 

Charlotte C. Perkins, Visitor ....... 996 50 

Frederick G. Southmayd, Visitor 1,500 00 

Edna G. Spitz, Visitor 847 78 

James H. Taylor, Visitor 1,200 00 

Marion S. Tewksbury, Visitor . 920 S3 

Emma I. Thomas, Visitor 800 00 

Millie H. Tileston, Visitor . - 920 83 

E. ^Vlabel Tyler, Visitor 1,000 00 

Marie I. Williams, Visitor 400 00 

Amount carried forward S53,855 71 



228 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



Amount brought forward 



James J. Winston, Visitor 

Agnes E. Brennan, Stenographer 

Susie L. Glynn, Stenographer . 

Florence M. Hagerty, Stenographer 

Lillian F. Hayes, Stenographer 

Anna G. Kiley, Stenographer . 

Mary T. KilHon, Stenographer 

Mary A. Murphy, Stenographer 

Dorothy Olin, Stenographer 

Alice G. O'Mealey, Stenographer 

LiUian D. Parks, Stenographer 

Casalena M. Sleeper, Stenographer 

Mildred S. Stenberg, Stenographer 

Lucy F. Sullivan, Stenographer 

Mary J. Sullivan, Stenographer 

Alice A. Page, Chief Accountant 

Emma W. Kelley, Accountant 

Catherine E. Smith, Chief Clerk 

Mary E. Weston, File Clerk . 

Lilla D. Baker, Clerk 

Alice S. Bennett, Clerk . 

Agnes F. Brown, Clerk 

Marion L. T. Bucknam, Clerk 

Maude A. McLean, Clerk . 

Anna E. Murphy, Clerk . 

Joseph E. Quinn, Clerk 

Frances M. Sheehan, Clerk 

Francis J. Turcotte, Transportation Officer 

Louis Feldman, Messenger 



Subdivision of Infants. 
Ed\s-in F. Cummings, M.D., Medical Visitor 
Frederick A. Burt, Visitor to Infants 
Edwin R. Sparrow, Inspector of Lying-in Hospitals 
Mary J. McCormack, Inspector of Infant Boarding Houses 
Abigail F. Barrett, Investigating Visitor 
Helen F. Horan, Investigating Visitor . 
Mary T. McCann, Investigating Visitor 
Elizabeth J. McDermott, Investigating Visitor 
S. Eleanor Merrill, Investigating Visitor 
Eunice A. Miller, Investigating Visitor . 
Beatrice K. Quinn, Investigating Visitor 



Amount carried forward 



[P. D. 17. 


S53,855 71 


1,200 00 


140 00 


750 00 


750 00 


750 00 


850 00 


227 42 


750 00 


108 97 


944 44 


534 68 


850 00 


147 04 


750 00 


750 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


500 00 


900 00 


146 51 


750 00 


800 00 


750 00 


750 00 


800 00 


287 63 


824 17 


40 71 


1,700 00 


1,700 00 


1,500 00 


75 00 


■ 800 00 


932 26 


858 33 


333 33 


926 07 


1,000 00 


800 00 


883,532 27 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 229 

Amount brought forward S83,o32 27 

Gertrude O'Connor, Investigating Visitor .... 293 34 

Sarah E. Rawson, Investigating Visitor 912 90 

Annie F. Merrill, Accountant 1,000 00 

Marie T. Connors, Clerk 650 00 

Georgiana C. Faden, Clerk 900 00 

Eugenie Goss, Clerk 83 87 

Georgiana M. ]Maheu, Clerk 750 00 

Annie B. McNeil, Clerk 750 00 

Frances J. Love, Clerk 500 00 

Total salaries S89,372 38 

Extra service 58 53 

Printing 924 26 

Postage 1,762 00 

Stationery and office expenses 1,234 55 

Telephone and telegraph 1,143 73 

Publications 26 25 

Superintendent's travel 6 95 

Miscellaneous expenses 46 00 

Total S94.574 65 

TEANSPORTATION OF STATE PAUPERS. 

Traveling expenses of officers: 

Harry G. Taft S241 82 

George S. Dubois 304 88 

Edouard C. Mailloux 262 01 

Arthur C. Briggs 1,257 27 

Mary J. Ross 548 07 

Clarke S. Gould 199 72 

Edward H. O'Brien 65 38 

James H. Quigley 204 52 

Total S3,083 67 

Foreign fares 2,282 68 

Inland fares 7,764 71 

Carriage and express 749 45 

Food and lodging 719 57 

Expenses of parole visitors ....... 103 87 

Expenses of branch office 200 01 

Assistance 828 74 

Transportation to State Infirmary 789 32 

Miscellaneous expenses 326 13 

Total S16,848 15 



230 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



INDIGENT AND NTIGLECTEI 


> CHILDREN. 




Board and travel of wards 


8363,605 51 


Clothing 




93,627 95 


Schooling 




48 78 


Physicians, medicine, hospital care, etc. 




26,990 62 


Expenses, Charles Street Temporary Home 




5,567 56 


Expenses, Wellesley Temporan 


' Home . 




6,747 65 


Assistance and miscellaneous 


. 






6,416 18 


Traveling expenses of visitors: 










Frederick G. Southmayd 






. 8392 57 




Nathan Coe . 










. 342 89 




Henry L. Gardner 










. 559 74 




Timothy J. Carey 










. 421 88 




Edward W. Bowker 










82 77 




G. Fred. Davis . 










. 632 99 




Arthur E. Newcomb 










. 423 03 




Joseph P. McInt\Te 










. 764 18 




Joseph W. Grautstuck 










. 237 43 




Roswell D. Blandy 










. 459 84 




Francis J. Turcotte . 










. 310 88 




Clifford B. Ballard . 










. 645 65 




William A. Bailey 










. 631 05 




J. Arthur Colburn 










. 405 55 




James H. Taylor 










. 522 22 




James J. Winston 










. 700 89 




Lucj^ B. Hancock 










. 262 13 




Mary F. IVIoonej' 










. 713 64 




Geraldine S. Jones 










. 372 70 




Jennie L. Harris . 










. 231 11 




Florence M. Carpentei 










. 602 80 




Mary T. Dwyer . 










. 276 85 




Winifred A. Keneran . 










. 106 86 




Emily F. Brennan 










. 389 70 




Ruth Lissner 










. 376 28 




Anna H. Bartlett 










. 485 78 




Marion L. Gerould . 










. 460 61 




Anna E. Murphy 










. 123 01 




Emily M. Mac Donald 








. 552 81 




EHzabeth IMcKeough 








. 362 19 




Metta Bean 








. 804 90 




Marion G. Noyes 








. 122 62 




Eugenia Locke . 








. 364 02 




Charlotte C. Perkins . 








. 273 79 




Amounts carried forward .... 


S14,415 36 


8503,004 25 



Part LI GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



231 



Amounts brought forward 



S14,415 36 8503,004 25 



Traveling expenses of visitors 
Ruth A. Baker . 
Marion S. Tewksbury 
Sophia T. Cole . 
Millie H. Tileston 
E.Mabel Tyler . 
Anna F. Craddock 
Bertha I. Berger . 
Edna G. Spitz . 
Elizabeth K. Myles 
Florence A. Blanchard 
Elizabeth B. Loomis 
Gladys G. MacDonald 
Harriet M. IMulry 
Mary A. Cotter . 
Emma I. Thomas 
A. Gertrude Daley 
^Lary R. Cady . 
James E. Fee 
H. Gardner Lund 
Marie I. Williams 
Sarah M. Hayes . 
Katharine C. Collins 



concluded. 



308 92 


418 88 


289 30 


371 36 


450 28 


287 42 


317 86 


254 19 


2 05 


11 28 


316 54 


147 07 


7 18 


245 37 


383 83 


231 63 


119 39 


194 73 


155 00 


149 53 


93 41 



19,477 18 



Total S522.481 43 

PAUPER INFANTS. 

Board $45,151 49 

Clothing 6,025 97 

Nursery expenses 1,867 67 

Physicians, medical attendance, hospitals, etc. . . 3,495 17 

Miscellaneous, assistance, express, etc 753 42 

Traveling expenses of officers: 

Edwin F. Cummings S78 36 ^ 

Frederick A. Burt 331 05 

Eunice A. Miller 280 87 

Ed^-in R. Sparrow 203 29 

Helen F. Horan ....... 512 54 

S. Eleanor Merrill 467 36 

Sarah E. Rawson 297 21 

Mary T. IMcCann 455 68 

Abigail F. Barrett 235 41 



Amounts carried forward 



82,861 77 857,293 72 



232 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Amounts brought forward 



$2,861 77 S57,293 72 



Traveling expenses of oflficers — concluded. 

Mary J. McCormack 39 69 

Gertrude O'Connor 150 47 

Beatrice K. Quinn 256 63 

Elizabeth J. McDermott 168 65 



Total 



3,477 21 
$60,770 93 



TUITION OF STATE CHILDREN. 



City and town bills $48,257 19 



AUXILL\RY VISITORS. 



Traveling and other expenses of auxiliary visitors 
Traveling and other expenses of almshouse visitors 

Total 



$48 10 
200 66 



S248 76 



SUPPORT OF SICK STATE PAUPERS. 

City and town bills of 1910 

" " " " " 1911 

" " '' " " 1912 . . ' . 

'' '' " " " 1913 

" " '' " " 1914 

" '' " '' " 1915 



Total 



$27 15 

71 41 

846 72 

2,145 28 

31,552 88 

30,356 39 

S64,999 83 



BURIAL OF STATE PAUPERS. 

City and town bills of 1912 

'' '' " " " 1913 

u (I a a a 1Q14. 

'' " " '' " 1915 

Total 



$19 15 

532 00 

3,372 36 

3,076 40 

86,999 91 



TEMPORARY AID OF STATE PAUPERS 

City and town bills of 1909 

U U U U U ;^9^Q 

U U U U U J9JJ 

u u u u u 1912 

u u u u u 1913 

u u u u u 1914 

" '' " " '' 1915 
Total city and town bills 
Amount carried forward 



$3 15 


102 92 


287 39 


958 44 


8,478 08 


86,762 64 


25,404 60 


$121,997 22 


$121,997 22 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 233 

Amount brought forward S12L997 22 

Physician's service 5 00 

Foreign fares 2,548 81 

Inland fares 406.01 

Express 32 71 



Total $124,989 75 

AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN. 

City and town bills of 1913 $10,268 78 

" '' " " " 1914 29,308 84 

" " " " '' 1915 210,422 00 



Total $249,999 62 



DANGEROUS DISEASES. 

City and town bills of 1910 $205 86 

" '' " " " 1911 118 00 

" " " " " 1912 453 31 

'' " '' '' " 1913 5,171 09 

" " " " " 1914 37,064 59 

" '' " " '' 1915 16,951 82 



Total city and town bills $59,964 67 

Inland fares 35 00 



Total $59,999 67 

PENIKESE HOSPITAL. 

Salaries : 

Frank H. Parker, Superintendent 

James A. Honeij 

Samuel F. Bryant . . . . . 

Edith Huntress 

LewtiM. Tufts 

Melvin A. Nason • . 

Eugene L. Douglass 

Allec Baltes 

John Baltes 

John Trebalacus 

Emma Thomas 

Mary I. Farnsworth 

Cory don F. Hicks 



$2,500 00 


2,500 00 


570 00 


583 34 


75 00 


945 83 


605 00 


245 00 


210 00 


210 00 


66 67 


725 90 


277 00 



Amount carried forward $9,513 74 



234 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Amount brought forward . . . . '. . . $9,513 74 

Mary E. Hicks '. . . . 238 91 

William Kennedy 11226 

Charles M. Lougee 79 04 

Edward Quint 67 75 

Peter Ryan 47 46 

William Young 47 46 

Total salaries $10,106 62 

Extra wages and labor 2,730 56 

Food 3,504 88 

Clothing and material 656 56 

Furnishings 1,000 11 

Heat, hght and power 1,352 16 

Repairs and improvements 3,040 00 

Farm, stable and grounds 2,114 52 

Religious services 10 00 

Miscellaneous 4,434 57 

Total $28,949 98 

ANNUAL REPORT. 

Printing annual report $2,614 17 

The above details may be classified as follows : — 

Salaries $173,321 86 

Travel of members 761 97 

Other travel 35,360 24 

Printing 2,288 91 

Stationery and office expenses 9,985 79 

Support of State wards 608,555 16 

Transportation . . . ■ 16,274 73 

Support of State outdoor poor 504,478 53 

Penikese Hospital . . . ' 28,949 98 

Printing annual report 2,614 17 



Total $1,382,591 34 



In order to insure greater efficiency and larger effort in 
service, and also to prevent the necessity of frequent con- 
sideration of special petitions for increase in salary, the Board 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 235 

has for many years maintained a graded system of increases 
operating automatically in the several grades of its employees. 
By chapter 605, Acts of 1914, the Commonwealth substantially 
enacted this system into its statutes, though the minimum 
amounts to be paid under the new law are materially higher 
than those allowed under the Board's system. As applied to 
all branches of the Board's service, other than clerical positions 
falling under the law above mentioned, the system is as fol- 
lows: — 

Men. — Visitors: first two years, 81,200; third year, $1,300; 
fourth year, 81,400; thereafter, 81,500. Transportation officers 
holding special District Police commissions: first two years, 
8900; third and fourth years, 81,000; thereafter, 81,100. Other 
transportation officers: first two years, 8700; third year, 8800; 
fourth year, 8900; fifth year, 81,000; thereafter, 81,100. 
Medical visitors of State adult poor: first two years, 81,200; 
third year, 81,350; fourth year, 81,500; fifth year, 81,650; 
thereafter, 81,S00. Medical visitors of infants: first two years, 
$1,200; third year, 81,275; fourth year, 81,350; fifth year, 
81,425; thereafter, 81,500. Assistant visitors: first two years, 
8600; third year, 8700; fourth year, 8S00; fifth year, 8900; 
thereafter, 81,000. Messengers: first two years, $250; second 
two years, 8300; thereafter, 8400. 

Wo?jien. — Transportation officers: first two years, 8600; 
third year, 8650; fourth year, 8700; fifth year, 8750; there- 
after, 8S00. Visitors: first two years, 8S00; third year, 8900; 
thereafter, 81,000. Visitor-at-large of boarded children: first 
two years, 8800; third year, 8S75; fourth year, 8950; fifth 
year, 81,025; thereafter, 81,100. 

Under the graded system salaries are increased during the 
present fiscal year as follows: Ruth A. Beebe, December 1, 

1915, to 81,000; Mary G. Cunniff, December 1, 1915, to 81,000; 
Mary R. Cady, January IS, 1916, to 81,000; G. Arthur Bod- 
well, February 2, 1916, to 81,300; Edward J. McDonough, 
February 24, 1916, to 81,400; Mary T. McCann, May 1, 1916, 
to 81,000; Abigail F. Barrett, May 25, 1916, to 8900; Arthur 
C. Briggs, June 6, 1916, to 81,100; Anna F. Craddock, June 9, 

1916, to 81,000; Edna G. Spitz, June 9, 1916, to 81,000; 
Bertha I. Berger, June 16, 1916, to 81,000; Joseph W. Grant- 



236 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

stuck, August 1, 1916, to $1,500; Beatrice K. Quinn, November 
12, 1916, to S900; John B. Gallagher, November 17, 1916, to 
$1,400; Frederick F. Green, November 17, 1916, to $1,400; 
William A. Bailey, November 18, 1916, to $1,300; Gladys G. 
MacDonald, November 23, 1916, to $900; James H. Taylor, 
November 23, 1916, to $1,300; James J. Winston, November 
23, 1916, to $1,300; Harriet M. Mulry, November 23, 1916, to 
$900. 

Under the provisions of chapter 605, Acts of 1914, above 
mentioned, certain salaries in the Board's clerical force were 
automatically increased as follows: Mary E. Callahan, Decem- 
ber 1, 1915, to $800; Annie G. Carpenter, December 1, 1915, 
to $850; Isa M. Dempsey, December 1, 1915, to $800; Florence 
G. Dickson, December 1, 1915, to $800; Ethel S. Greene, 
December 1, 1915, to $800; Jennie I. Gurney, December 1, 
1915, to $800; Matilda V. Hall, December 1, 1915, to $800; 
Sophie E. Finklestein, December 1, 1915, to $800; May F. 
Fuller, December 1, 1915, to $800; Lillian G. Gaffey, December 
1, 1915, to $800; Winifred C. Gilbody, December 1, 1915, to 
$800; Mary C. McLain, December 1, 1915, to $800; Lauretta 
M. Moran, December 1, 1915, to $800; Margaret E. O'Connell, 
December 1, 1915, to $800; James J. O'Toole, December 1, 
1915, to $900; Agnes F. Brown, December 1, 1915, to $800; 
Marion L. T. Bucknam, December 1, 1915, to $850; Marie T. 
Conners, December 1, 1915, to $700; Susie L. Glynn, December 
1, 1915, to $800; Florence M. Hagerty, December 1, 1915, to 
$800; Anna G. Kiley, December 1, 1915, to $900; Frances J. 
Love, December 1, 1916, to $550; Georgiana M. Mahew, 
December 1, 1915, to $800; Maude A. McLean, December 1, 

1915, to $800; Anna E. Murphy, December 1, 1915, to $800; 
Mary A. Murphy, December 1, 1915, to $800; Casalena M. 
Sleeper, December 1, 1915, to $900; Lucy F. Sullivan, Decem- 
ber 1, 1915, to $800; Mary J. Sullivan, December 1, 1915, to 
$800; Marion H. Naylor, February 1, 1916, to $950; Sadie G. 
Proudman, March 29, 1916, to $800; Mary T. Killion, July 15, 

1916, to $650; James B. Kerrigan, July 26, 1916, to $800; 
Alice S. Bennett, August 16, 1916, to $550; Alice C. Taylor, 
October 1, 1916, to $800; Herbert L. Keeble, October 1, 1916,. 
to $800. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 237 

The Auxiliary Visitors of older girls placed out, 1915-16, are: 
Ella M. Bacall, Newton Highlands; Martha B. Bishop, North 
Brookfield; Mrs. Sanford Boice, South Ashfield; Alice T. S. 
Brewster, Pittsfield; Elizabeth R. Bridgman, Belchertown; 
Mary E. Brown, West Roxbury; ]\Iabelle L. Butler, Franklin; 
Sarah Alden Burt, West Tisbury; Ellen T. A. Callahan, 
Worcester; Anne M. Chapin, Springfield; ]\Irs. Arthur W. 
Carr, Bridgewater; Agnes M. Cornwell, Maiden; Margaret E. 
Costello, Franklin; Florence S. A. Davis, Quincy; Emma L. 
Dickinson, Baldwinville; Rev. Sarah I. Dixon, Tewksbury; 
Mrs. Frank S. Field, Shattucksville; Elvira . M. Gorham, 
Bellows Falls, Vermont; Flora R. Greely, Athol; Ellen M. 
Hartwell, Littleton Common; Rose Boyle Herbert, Worcester; 
Lucy A. Hitchcock, Palmer; Cora Huse, Wakefield; Florence 
W. Hutchinson, Pepperell; Elizabeth H. Kelley, Falmouth; 
Amanda T. C. King, Thompsonville, Conn.; Sara G. Knight, 
Worcester; M. Edna Larabee, Melrose; Margaret Mclntyre, 
Worcester; Mary K. Morton, Hatfield; Mary Lawlor Murphy, 
Boston; Abigail F. Nims, Greenfield; Mary Quirk, South 
Boston; Helen Russell, Plymouth; Katherine V. Shinners, 
Dorchester; Sabra C. Snell, Amherst; Florence Stowe, Bel- 
mont; Mary B. Townsley, Springfield; Bertha L. Turner, 
Watertown; Ellen H. Underwood, South Dennis; Mary E. 
Veber, Charlemont; Alice E. Wetherbee, Fall River; Abbie M. 
White, Farnumsville; Harriet J. Williams, Wellfleet. Mrs. Ada 
E. Shefiield of Cambridge, INIiss Mary Byers Smith of Andover, 
Miss Mary Goodell and Miss Hazel Hanchette of Lowell, and 
Miss Katherine Delaney of Dorchester are volunteer visitors to 
the State Infirmary. 

The Parole Visitors of prisoners released from the State Farm, 
1915-16, are: Albert Arnold, Boston; Daniel W. Bates, West- 
field; Cornelius Buckley, Natick; Rev. Eugene Carney, Rox- 
bury; Peter Carr, Lawrence; Rev. Clark Carter, Lawrence; 
Chester L. Clark, Milford; James H. Conley, Charlestown; 
William F. Dineen, North Adams; Rev. Timothy J. Fahey, 
Roxbury; Joseph M. Fitzgerald, Pittsfield; Frank E. Flaherty, 
Somerville; William Forsberg, Worcester; Rev. Thomas Gil- 
hooly, Roxbury; Edward A. Hall, Springfield; George L. 
Harris, Northampton;' Harold C. Haskell, Brookline; Joseph 



238 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. Part I. 

H. Ladd, South Framingham; J. Fred Leslie, Woburn; Rev. 
Oscar Lindegren, East Boston; Joseph P. Love, Webster; John 
E. Lynch, Boston; Peter J. Lynch, Melrose; Oswald J. 
McCourt, West Newton; Thomas J. McEneaney, LawTence; 
John J. McGaffigan, Boston; John J. McGrath, Amesbury; 
John F. Mitchell, Marlborough; Rev. William G. Mullin, 
Lowell; Rev. Frank V. Murphy, Roxbury; William H. O'Neil, 
Salem; Artemus Packard, Cambridge; Moses J. Perrault, 
Fitchburg; Frederick W. Robinson, Boston; Thomas B. 
Rounds, Somerset; D. W. Stowell, Huntington; Michael 
Sweeney, Fall River; John W. Trehy, Chicopee; Rev. John B. 
Whiteman, Greenfield; Edward B. Wilbur, Taunton; John A. 
Winn, Charlestown; Capt. James A. Wright, Beverly. 

MEETINGS OF THE BOARD. 

During the official year ending November 30, 1915, the Board 
held twenty-six meetings, viz., twenty-three regular meetings 
and three adjourned and special meetings. The attendance of 
members at these meetings was as follows: Mr. Lincoln, nine- 
teen meetings; Miss Curtis, fifteen; Mr. Adams, twenty-five; 
Mr. Tilley, fifteen; Mr. Johnson, twenty-four; Mr. Ratshesky, 
fifteen; Mr. Brackett, eighteen; Mr. Downey, seven; Mrs. 
Sheffield, two; Miss Barr, twenty; Dr. Merrick, eight; Mrs. 
Guild, four. There were, in addition, frequent meetings of the 
Standing Committees. 

The results of all these meetings are embodied in the fore- 
going report. 



INDEX TO PART I. 




of incorpo 



Acts of Legislature affecting the Board, 1915 
Administration, duties of . 
Adoptions . . . . . 

Law affecting notice of . . , 

After-care of women and children discharged from 
Almshouses, minor children in . 
Application for mothers' aid, form of . 
Appropriation for reimbursement in mothers' aid 
Appropriations for State charitable institutions 
Auxiliary visitors ..... 

Board of patients at the State sanatoria 

Boarding houses for infants, licensed . 

Bridgewater. See State Farm. 

Bridgewater State Hospital, act relative to support of State charges in 

By-laws of the Board .... 

Canton. See Massachusetts Hospital School. 
Capacities of State charitable institutions 
Charitable corporations, recommendation of Board's approval 
ration ...... 

Charitable funds, law requiring report of instruments creating 
Children in care and custody of the Board , 

Adoptions of .... . 

Over three years of age 

Tuition of . 

Under three years of age 
City and town hospitals, recommendation of increase in reimbursements to 
Cities and towns furnishing mothers' aid 

Penalty for failure to make pauper returns . 

The settled poor ...... 

Committees of the Board, standing 
Commonwealth v. Dee ..... 

Cost of maintaining the State charitable institutions 
County training schools, the .... 

New buildings for Hampden County 
Dangerous diseases, cases of ... . 

Dee, Commonwealth v. .... . 

Dependent minor children in almshouses 
Destitute parents, children must support 
Dipsomaniacs, law affecting commitment of . 
Discharge from State training schools, law affecting 
Duties of the Board ...... 

Employees of the Board, numbers 

Employment of minors ..... 

Essex County Training School .... 



PAGE 

12 

7. 175 
194 
13 
181 
155 
170 
174 
133, 135 



11 

12 

184 

194 

186 

217 

185 

12 

160 

156 

152 

3 

191 

23, 137 

146 

17 

176 

192 

155 

18 

13 

16 

6, 175 

3 

15 

146 



240 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Executive officers of the Board . 

Expenditures of the State charitable institutions . . . 23, 29, 

Expenses of the Board ..... 

Families, the settled poor in ... . 

Feeble-minded, recommendation of third school for 

Finances of the Board ..... 

Financial administration of institutions 

Foundlings, law affecting notice in adoption of 

Functions of the Board ..... 

Graded system of salaries, the .... 

Hampden County Training School 

New buildings for ..... 

Hospital Cottages for Children, Baldwinville 
Hospital for sick State wards, recommendation for 
Industrial School for Boys ..... 
Industrial School for Girls ..... 
Infirm prisoners, act relative to transfer of . 
Insane persons, act relative to service of warrants 
Institutions, the State charitable 
Inventory of State charitable institutions 
Investigating department of the Minor Wards Division 
Lakeville State Sanatorium .... 

Lancaster. See Industrial School for Girls. 
Laws affecting the Board passed in 1915 
Legislation, recommendations for 
Lepers, care and treatment of, in Massachusetts . 

Penikese Hospital for ..... 
Licensed boarding houses for infants . 
Lying-in hospitals, licensed . . . 

Lyman School for Boys ..... 
Maintenance of the State charitable institutions . 
Massachusetts Hospital School .... 
Massachusetts Training Schools, act further defining powers of trustees of 
Meetings of the Board .... 

Members of the Board, past and present 
Middlesex County Training School 
Minor children in almshouses 
Minor wards in care and custody of the Board 

Adoptions of .... . 

Disposition of .... . 

Localities from which received 

Support of . 

Tuition of . 
Minors, law affecting school attendance and employment of 

law affecting reimbursement for schooling of 

in custody, earnings of . . . 

Mother and baby cases discharged from State Infirmary, after-care of 
Mothers' aid .... 

Appropriation for 

Cities and towns furnishing . 

Form of application for 

Policies of the Board relating to 

Rules relative to 

Work of the visitors 
Narcotics, law affecting commitment of persons addicted to use of 



PAGE 

3 

122, 133 

222 

153 

9 

221 

116 

13 

6 

234 

146 

17 

20 

9 

48 

51 

19 

18 

20 

116 

188 

67 

12 
9 

74 

73 

204 

213 

44 

23, 123 

54 

16 

4,238 

vi 

146 

154 

184 

194 

199 

202 

190 

217 

15 

14 

17 

181 

157 

174 

160 

170 

165 

168 

174 

13 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OE THE BOARD. 



:4i 



Net cost of State charitable institutions 
Net per capita cost of State charitable institutions 
Non-support proceedings ..... 
Norfolk, Bristol and PljTnouth Union Training School 
Norfolk State Hospital 

Law affecting commitments to . . . 

North Reading State Sanatorium 
Numbers in State charitable institutions 
Organization, of the Board .... 

Of the report ...... 

Of the staff 

Parents, children must support destitute 

Parole visitors ....... 

Pauper returns, penalty for failure to make . 
Pay roll, analysis of State charitable institutions . 
Penikese Hospital ...... 

Separate board of trustees for, recommended . 
Per capita cost of State charitable institutions 
Policies of the Board relating to mothers' aid 
Poor, the State outdoor ..... 

Cost of reimbursement on account of 

Removals of ..... . 

Population of the State charitable institutions 
Presentation of the report ..... 

Prisoners, act relative to transfer of infirm . 

Receipts of State charitable institutions 

Receipts of State sanatoria for board of patients . 

Recommendations for legislation 

Reimbursement for local sick aid, change in amount of, recommended 

Removals of poor persons . 

Rules of the Board relative to mothers' aid 

Rutland State Sanatorium . 

Sanatoria. See State Tuberculosis Sanatoria. 

School attendance of minors, change in reimbursement for 

School attendance of minors, law affecting , 

School for the feeble-minded, recommendation regarding 

Secretary of the Board, duties of 

Settled poor, the .... 

Shirley. See Industrial School for Boys. 

Sick State poor, the . 

Staff, organization of . 

Standing committees of the Board 

State charitable institutions, the 

Appropriations for 

Capacity of 

Expenditures of . 

Financial administration of 

Inventory of 

Maintenance cost of 

Movement of population and expenses of 

Numbers in 

Net cost of 

Receipts of 

Special appropriations for 
State Farm, the 



242 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. Part I. 



State Infirmary, the ...... 

Act relative to support of state charges in 

After-care of women and children discharged from 
State institutions. See State Charitable Institutions. 
State minor wards ..... 

Recommendation of State Hospital for . 

Support of . 

Tuition for schooling of . . . 

State outdoor poor, the .... 

Cost of reimbursement on account of 
State training schools, the .... 

Act affecting discharges and transfers from 
Superintendent of State Adult Poor, duties of 
Superintendent of State Minor Wards, duties of 
Supervision, duties of .... 

Support of destitute parents 
Temporary aid, cases of . . . . 

Tewksbury. See State Infirmary. 
Training schools, the county 

The State 

Transfers of infirm prisoners, act relative to . 

Truant schools. See County Training Schools. 

Trustees of the several State charitable institutions 

Tuberculosis, the State, sanatoria 

Tuition for schooling of State minor wards . 

Visitors to mothers' aid cases, work of 

Warrants for commitment of insane persons, service of 

Westfield State Sanatorium .... 

Widows' pension. See Mothers' Aid. 

Wife-settlement, cases of . 

Women and children discharged from the State Infirmary, after-care of 

Worcester County Training School 



PAGE 

30 

19 

181 

184 

9 

190 

217 

175 

177 

43 

16 

5 

5 

6,7 

18 

177 

146 
43 
19 

20 
58 
217 
174 
18 
70 

176 
181 
146 



REPORT 

OF THE 

State Bo-\ed of Ohaeity 



Part II 



Chaeitable Oorpoeations 



CHAEITABLE COEPORATIOXS. 



Investigation of Charitable Organizations seeking Incorporation. 

Chapter ISl of the Acts of 1910 requires the Board to in- 
vestigate, give public hearing and report its findings to the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth in all cases of charitable 
organizations which seek incorporation. The text of the act 
is as follows : — 

Acts of 1910, Chapter ISl. 

Section 1. Before making and issuing a certificate for the incorpora- 
tion of a charitable corporation the secretary of the commonwealth shall 
also forward such statement as is described in the preceding section to 
the state board of charity, which shall immediately make an investiga- 
tion as to the persons who have asked to be incorporated and as to the 
purposes of the incorporation, and any other material facts relative 
thereto, and shaU give them a pubhc hearing, notice of which shaU be 
published once a week for three successive weeks in some paper pub- 
lished in the county in which the corporation is to have its principal 
ofl5ce or rooms, and if said office or rooms are to be in Boston, in some 
Boston daily paper, the last publication to be at least three days before 
the day set for the hearing, and shall forthwith report to the secretary 
of the commonwealth all the facts ascertained by it. If it appears to 
the secretarj' of the commonwealth from said report or otherwise that 
the probable purpose of the formation of the proposed corporation is 
to cover any illegal business, or that the persons asking for incorporation 
are not suitable persons, from lack of financial abihty or from any other 
cause, he shaU refuse to issue his certificate. If he refuses to issue his 
certificate, the persons asking to be incorporated may appeal to the 
superior court, which shall hear the case and finally determine whether 
or not the certificate of incorporation shaU be issued. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

During the year ending November 30, 1915, 53 applications 
for charters have been referred by the Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth to this Board, which has investigated, given hear- 
ings and reported upon the -16 applications noted below. In 



iv STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

the 7 other eases the petitions were withdrawn from this Board 
before report. 

Associated Charities of Attleboro, Mass., Inc., Attleboro. 

Beth David and Linath Hazedek Association, East Boston. 

Boston Chiropodists, Inc., Boston. 

Charity Brotherhood of the Holy Ghost of the North End of New Bedford, 

Mass., Inc., New Bedford. 
Congregation Anshai Scheptowka, Boston. 
Congregation Sons of Abraham of Boston, Boston. 
DooUttle Universahst Home for Aged Persons, Inc., Foxborough. 
Economic Foundation, Inc., Boston. (Withdra\^Ti.) 
First Pentecostal Church and The Non-Sectarian Rescue Home, Boston. 

(Refused.) 
Franklin Playground and Garden Association, Franklin. 
French Benevolent and Relief Association, Boston. 
Friends of Liberty Club, Boston. 
Girls' Club Association of Maiden, Inc., Maiden. 
Hebrew Chesed Shel Emas of the South End of Boston, Boston. 
Hebrew Ladies' Loan Association, Boston. 
Holden Visiting Nurse Association, Inc., Holden. 
Irreproachable Beneficial Association of Greater Boston, Boston. 
Jan Sobieski Brotherly Aid Association of Springfield, Springfield. 
King's Daughters' Circle of '86, Inc., Needham. 
Knights of Columbus Building Association of Greater Boston, Boston. 
Maiden Anti-Tuberculosis Society, Inc., Maiden. 
Massachusetts Branch of the Shut In Society, Inc., Boston. 
Massachusetts Pythian Sisters' Home Association, Boston. 
Missionary- Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate Conception, Ne^sion. 
Moslem Mutual Benefit Association in America, Peabody. 
Mount Moriah Hebrew School of Dorchester, Inc., Dorchester. 
Mussulmans Benevolent Society, Inc., Quincy. 
New England Grenfell Association, Boston. 
Newton Welfare Bureau, Inc., Newi:on. 
Norwegian Old Peoples Home and Charitable Association of Greater 

Boston, Boston. 
Olympia Theatres Association, Boston. 
Portuguese Immigrant Aid Society of the United States of America, Inc., 

Boston. 
Quincy Women's Riverside Club, Quincy. 
Roxbury Ladies' Bikur Cholim Association, Roxbury. 
Rufus F. Dawes Hotel Association, Boston. 
Society of the Franco- American Dispensary of Worcester, Mass., 

Worcester. 
Sons and Daughters of Scotland bearing the Sub-title Comunn nan Al- 

bannach America (Scots National League of America), Saugus. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. v 

Students Protective Home Association, Boston. (Withheld.) 

Union Beige, Incorporated, Boston. 

Union Labor Temple Associates, Inc., of Worcester, Mass., Worcester. 

Wakefield Firemen's ReHef Association, Wakefield. (Withheld.) 

Whitinsville Hospital, Inc., Northbridge. 

Winfred Goff Homoeopathic Hospital, New Bedford. 

Wood Memorial Home, Inc., Boston. 

Worcester Free Loan Association, Worcester. 

Working Man's Social Club, Incorporated, Pittsfield. 

Forty-two of the above petitions have been granted and 
charters issued, while 3 have been refused. One w^ithdrew its 
application after investigation. 

During the five years and nine months which have elapsed 
since the passage of the law (March 7, 1910, to November 30, 
1915) the Board has reported upon 315 applications for charters, 
261 of which w^ere granted, 53 refused, w^hile 1 withdrew after 
investigation. In 46 other cases the applications were with- 
draw^n before investigation. 

During the year 3 charters were surrendered, as follow^s: — 

Christian Endeavor Home for Seamen at Nagasaki, Japan. 
Gwynne Temporary Home for Children, Boston. 

United States Volunteer Life Saving Corps of Volunteer Life Savers, 
Boston. 

Inspection of Charitable Corporations. 

Chapter 379 of the Acts of 1909 requires the State Board of 
Charity to make annual inspection of charitable corporations 
which consent to said inspection. The text of the act is as 
follows: — 

Acts of 1909, Chaptee 379. 

Section 1. The state board of charity, upon the request or with the 
consent of a charitable corporation wliich, imder the provision of section 
fourteen of chapter eighty-four of the Revised Laws, as amended by 
chapter four hundred and two of the acts of the year nineteen hundred 
and three, is required to make an annual report to said board, shall, at 
least once in every year, visit and inspect the institution or investigate 
the work of such corporation. 

Section 2. Tliis act shall take effect upon its passage. 

In the five years since the work of inspection was begun, 
1,102 visits of inspection have been made to charitable corpora- 



vi STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

tions in all parts of the Commonwealth, including 274 inspec- 
tions during the past twelve months. 

In the past year there have been 268 inquiries in regard to 
particular agencies by persons not connected with them as 
officers or members, and 447 inquiries on general matters con- 
nected with the field of private charity. 

In consequence of visits of inspection, 56 conferences were 
had with representatives of 37 different agencies. Two of the 
societies with which conferences have been held have engaged 
trained workers and 1 other is planning to do so as soon as 
sufficient funds are raised. The friendly conference between 
a society and the Board's inspectors, following a careful study 
of the particular agency, is intended to be a discussion of 
standards of charitable work set by the best managed societies. 

Through the co-operation of the Boston Associated Charities 
and the Boston Chamber of Commerce, both of which formerly 
visited incorporated charities, this field of inspection has been 
left in the hands of this Board. Much duplication has thus 
been avoided. 

It becomes necessary to repeat that the Board, regardless of 
the known standing of the society in question, does not indorse 
charities seeking contributions from the public. Inspection 
does not mean approval, and no agency which has been in- 
spected is warranted in using the fact in such manner as to 
lead the public to believe that the Board has in fact approved 
its work. The results of inspection clearly indicate that such 
a conclusion cannot be drawn, for of the 274 visits made during 
the year to societies incorporated as charities, 6 were to agencies 
found to be non-charitable, while the remaining agencies varied 
greatly in their efficiency. 

The work of inspection shows that the vital need in all fields 
of charitable endeavor is to diminish poverty not by doles 
but by building up the individual to the point of self help. 
The private charitable agency to a somewhat greater degree 
than the public body is in a position to emphasize this phase 
of effort, since it may select its cases so as to exclude many of 
those who are permanently dependent, and may also, with 
less hindrance, employ educational methods for the betterment 
of the community. 



PartIL] CHAKITABLE CORPORATIONS. vii 

Important elements in any local movement having for its 
objects the reduction of poverty and the upbuilding of the 
family are co-operation among charitable agencies and indi- 
viduals and the avoidance of duplication of effort. This is 
an eflSciency test which, when applied to charitable work, will 
result in the establishment of a central organization for corre- 
lating charitable effort and preventing waste of energy. Such 
agency may be known as a charity organization society or 
associated charities, but its object should be, through good 
case work with needy families, to reduce poverty, to prevent 
pauperism and to focus all constructive effort for community 
betterment touching needy families. 

In the following discussion of standards in charitable effort 
the group of charity organization societies is chosen for the 
purpose of illustration, for although they are but 25 in number 
— a relatively small group — the field of their activity is so 
important and their work, if well done, so vital, that the con- 
sideration of standards as applied to them is doubly pertinent. 

The foremost need of a society for organizing charity is an 
active and representative board of directors who realize the 
opportunities and responsibilities attending the direction of such 
work. Their duties include an intelligent knowledge of the 
problems involved; the shaping of policies; the raising of neces- 
sary funds to finance the organization; and the employment 
of a staff of well-trained workers. Several of the societies in 
this group have boards of directors who are inclined to leave 
everything to the paid worker, who not only carries a heavy 
burden of case work, but is often overtaxed with the raising of 
funds and other duties which should be performed by the 
directors. The worker in such case lacks the inspiration and 
the backing which a sympathetic and helpful board can give. 

The agents in charge of the work of such a society need to 
be persons with special training and mature judgment, who 
are endowed with what may be termed constructive imagina- 
tion and are able to diagnose and relieve both individual and 
social causes of distress. They need to be expert in dealing 
with family problems. Their aim is, by their good case work 
and ability to enlist the co-operation of the different individuals 
and organizations for social betterment, to preserve the self- 



viii STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

respect of each needy applicant and in due time restore him 
to independence. 

To accomplish this it is necessary to form constructive plans, 
and these, in turn, require for their basis an intelligent and 
sympathetic investigation of the applicants and their circum- 
stances, with a view to discovering the causes of their need. 

Instances are known w^here regular aid has been given to a 
family whose breadwinner was unable to work because of physi- 
cal infirmity, yet no medical assistance was furnished. 

The charity organization societies which fail to measure up 
to good standards of work do so largely because their directors 
and agents do not realize that their best function is not to 
furnish or to procure material relief, but to remove causes of 
dependence. 

A number of applicants will be found on preliminary in- 
vestigation to be in need of interim aid. Although the charity 
organization society may not itself aim to furnish such relief, 
it should be in a position to organize all the natural resources 
of the community, both public and private, to procure it when 
it is needed. These may include the family itself, relief so- 
cieties, medical agencies, churches, fraternal organizations, 
employers, benevolent individuals, relatives and others. 

It is not always possible, especially in the smaller communi- 
ties, with fewer charitable funds upon which to draw, to get a 
prompt response to sudden calls for relief, in which case the 
society itself may be obliged to raise each year a special fund 
from which interim aid may be provided. 

It may also be necessary for the organization to initiate 
various other activities which are lacking, and to support them 
until a favorable opportunity for placing them in other hands 
occurs. Thus, the charity organization society may need to 
inaugurate anti-tuberculosis work, district nursing or baby 
hygiene clinics, as well as to raise funds for various forms of 
material relief. 

Appeals to the public for money should clearly indicate that 
contributions to the general funds are for administration and 
the work of organizing charity, while funds for relief or other 
special purposes are separately administered. Unless this 
distinction is made, the public mind is confused by the fact 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. ix 

that the society gives material aid, and assumes that it is a 
relief society only. A number of the charity organization socie- 
ties in this Commonwealth lend color to this belief on the part 
of many persons by doing little constructive work and con- 
fining their efforts largely to the giving of grocery orders, old 
clothing, etc. 

The practice of taking a portion of a busy worker's time to 
secure positions for those who are not in any sense handi- 
capped and who should obtain work through the regular 
channels is not uncommon and diverts time and energy from 
the main purpose of the society. 

A problem which looms large in every department of chari- 
table endeavor is the question of duplication of effort, with its 
attending waste. Needy families are in danger of being visited 
and interrogated by more than one individual; of getting 
relief from several sources which are not in touch with one 
another, — with the result that family pride and independence 
are weakened, and no coherent plans are made. Much of the 
duplication which exists on every hand> comes from failure on 
the part of charitable societies and individuals to co-operate in 
exchanging information as to those whom they aid. A bureau 
of registration for recording the names and addresses of persons 
known to public and private charitable agencies, with the 
name of the organizations or individuals to whom they are 
known, should be established. Those who are called upon for 
aid might then ascertain whether the applicant is known to 
other agencies. Such precaution would tend to lessen the 
confusion which often attends the administration of relief. 
The case of the widow who received 5 turkeys at Christmas 
and had no fuel with which to cook the dinner finds its parallel 
in many instances. The associated charities, in its work of 
organizing community resources, will place special emphasis 
on the development of a bureau for the confidential exchange 
of information as an efficient means of bringing about good 
co-operation in the interest of needy persons. 

Much assistance may be given to the agent of the organiza- 
tion by volunteer friendly visitors to families. These are 
especially valuable where there are children or where regular 
relief is given. Such a plan cannot be successfully carried on, 



X STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

however, unless the agent is able to devote sufficient time to 
keep in close touch with the visitors and direct their activities. 
A study class for volunteers will be found of great assistance in 
familiarizing visitors with their functions. 

The work of a charity organization society is much strength- 
ened by a case conference, meeting at regular intervals, and 
attended by friendly visitors and representatives of the public 
and private charities and civic bodies. Such conference should 
consider plans for families and individuals who are referred for 
aid. Matters brought up in the conference should be treated 
as confidential, and should not be discussed with persons who 
are not directly interested in helping the needy persons. 

The society's agents should be given regular and sufficient 
clerical assistance to manage the office part of the work effi- 
ciently. A good system of case records of families known to 
the society is indispensable. These should show the facts re- 
vealed by investigation, the plans made on the basis of such 
study, the interplay of co-operating agencies and individuals in 
carrying out such plans, and the after-care given. 

The records, if well kept, are usefid, not only in working with 
the families to which they refer, but in making studies of 
causes of need, under proper safeguards against personal pub- 
licity, with a view to their eradication from the family and the 
community. This latter is the reason for all constructive work. 

With this end in \'iew, a diagnosis of each family situation 
should be attempted. The presence of mental or physical 
disability, delinquency, intemperance, nonsupport, low wages, 
poor housekeeping, bad housing, and other causes which 
brought the family to the attention of the charity organization 
society, should be indicated. The problems involved may then 
be attacked, not only through the case work but in co-opera- 
tion with other agencies which are interested in community 
improvement. 

The well-organized society, with sufficient funds and ex- 
perienced workers, is in a position to digest its cases and to 
use them as a basis for campaigns for good housing, the pre- 
vention of infant mortality, the employment of school nurses 
and the better enforcement of laws, such as those relating to 
fire prevention and contagious disease. 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. xi 

The smaller society, with a worker whose time is fully occu- 
pied with the recurring family problems, cannot undertake 
successfully all the diverse activities of the organization with 
a larger corps of agents. If, however, it is sufficiently well 
organized to secure good investigations, to make intelligent and 
constructive plans, and to work in harmony with the public 
and private agencies and individuals in the community, it is 
on a sound footing of usefulness and may initiate many needed 
movements which others will further. 

Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations. 

The law provides that the Board shall receive annual reports 
of all charitable corporations whose personal property is exempt 
from taxation, and for the dissolution of corporations which 
fail for two consecutive years to report to this Board. The text 
of the law is as follows (Revised Laws, chapter 84, section 14, 
amended by Acts of 1903, chapter 402, amended by Acts of 
1913, chapter 82): — 

A charitable corporation whose personal property is exempt from taxa- 
tion under the provisions of clause three of section five of chapter twelve 
shall annually, on or before the first day of November, make to the state 
board of charity a written or printed report for its last financial year, 
showing its property, its receipts and expenditures, the whole number 
and the average number of its beneficiaries and such other information 
as the board may require. If any corporation subject to the provisions of 
this act shall fail for two successive years to file the said report, the su- 
preme judicial court, upon application by the state board of charity, after 
notice and a hearing may decree a dissolution of the corporation. 

Section 2. This act shall take eftect upon the first day of November 
in the year nineteen hundred and thirteen. 

Of the 862 corporations whose returns were called for during 
the last official year, 55 failed to respond. The remaining 807 
corporations filed reports, 51 of them for the first time. The 
names of the delinquent corporations follow: — 

Association for Independent Co-operative Living, Boston. 
Benoth Israel Sheltering Home, Boston. 
Beverly Hebrew Ladies' Association, Beverly. 
Bikor Cholim Society, Worcester. 
Bishop Stang Day Nursery, Fall River. 



xii STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Boston Atlantic Marine Benefit Association, Boston. 

Boston Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston,. - 

Boston Work Horse Parade AssociatioanBoston. 

Brigham Hospital, Boston. ,i 

Carolina Industrial School, Boston. L 

Chevra Chesed Shel Emas, Worcester. 

Chicopee Boys' Club, Chicopee. 

County Sligo Benevolent and Protective Association of Greater Boston, 

Boston. 
Co-Worker's Fraternit^^ Company, Boston. 
Daughters of Jacob, Fall River. 
East End Hebrew Gemilath Chassodim Association of Fall River, Fall 

River. 
Fall River Hebrew Women's Charitable Institution, Fall River. 
Female Charitable Society of West Boxford, Boxford. 
Free Home for Consumptives in the City of Boston, Dorchester. 
Gloucester Female Charitable Association, Gloucester. 
Harvard Legal Aid Bureau, Cambridge. 

Harvard University (Collis P. Huntington Memorial Hospital), Boston. 
Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Association, Chelsea. 
Hebrew Ladies' Helping Hand Society of Fall River, Fall River. 
Holy Child Day Nursery, Charlestown. 
Imperial Japanese Benevolent Association, Boston. 
International Working People's Educational Center, Boston. 
Ladies' Gmeloos Chasodem Association, Lowell. 
Lynn Hebrew Ladies' Helping Hand Society, Lynn. 
Lynn Home for Children, Ljmn. 
Massachusetts Lying-in Hospital, Boston. 
Massachusetts Prison Association, Boston. 
Methuen Humane Society, Methuen. 
Musicians' Aid Society, Boston. 

Newburyport Howard Benevolent Society, Newburyport. 
New England Helping Hand Society, Boston. 
North End Dispensary, Boston. 
Particular Council Society, St. Vincent de Paul of the City of Boston, 

Boston. 
Polish National Alliance Immigration Aid Society, Boston. 
Roslindale Boys' Club, Roslindale. 
Salem Seamen's Bethel Society, Salem. 

Society St. Vincent de Paul, Particular Council of Lynn, Lynn. 
Somerville Boys' Club, Somerville. 

Somerville Young Men's Christian Association, Somerville. 
Springfield Association for the Prevention of Tuberculosis, Springfield. 
Syrian Burial Society, Boston. 
United Sisters Biker-Chaihm Association, Boston. 
Wood Memorial Home, Boston. 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. xiii 

Worcester Hebrew Gmiled Chased Society, Worcester, 

Worcester Ladies' Chevra Kadisha of Worcester, Worcester. 

Young Men's Christian Associa'"on of Middleborough, Middleborough. 

Young Men's Christian Associa^on of Milford, Milford. 

Young Men's Christian Association of Nahant, Nahant. 

Young Men's Christian Association of North Adams, North Adams. 

Young Men's Educational Aid Association, Boston. 

Reports. 

Abstracts of reports of corporations for the last financial 
year available are given on the following pages. The reports 
are arranged by towns, in alphabetical order under each town. 

Reports from 180 corporations which do not fall strictly 
within the scope of the Board's publication are pn file but are 
not here printed. Their names will be found in the alpha- 
betical list of reporting corporations. 

A list of homes for the aged throughout the State and other 
classified groups for greater Boston will be found at the end. 



REPORTS 



Adams. 

SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE (GREYLOCK REST), East St., Adams. (In- 
corporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Rt. Rev. Thomas D. Beaven, D.D., President; Sister Mary 
Agatha (Ellen McKenna), Secretary; Mother Mary of Provi- 
dence (Catherine Horan), Treasurer; Sister M. Consilii, Superin- 
tendent. 

Care and treatment of chronic, convalescent, and nervous 
patients (insanity excluded). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 397, viz., 320 paying, 56 partly 
paying, 21 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 

Total current receipts , 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$13,563 99 
772 62 

$14,336 61 

48 43 



$14,385 04 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$1,206 08 


Printing, postage, and 


office 




supplies 




365 45 


Provisions and supplies 




6,520 25 


Heat, light, and power 




1,310 23 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . 




1,816 88 


Payment on mortgage 




1,000 00 


Interest and insurance 


. 


1,949 61 


Miscellaneous . 




87 87 


Total current expenses 


$14,256 37 


Cash on hand . 




128 67 




$14,385 04 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$37,000; mortgage on same, $36,000; value of investments, 
$5,000. 

Amesbuky. 

AMESBURY AND SALISBURY HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 276 Main St., 
Amesbury. (Incorporated 1874.) 

Report for year ending May 27, 1915. 

Mrs. Marie W. Sargent, President; Mrs. Frances B. Clement, 
Secretary; x\lfred C. Webster, Treasurer; Mrs. Jessie F. Wells, 
Superintendent. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Home for aged women, Protestants, at least sixty years of age, 
inhabitants of Amesbury or Salisbury for five years. Admission, 
$100, and conveyance of property to home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2 (and 1 part time). 

Number aided during year, 9. 



Dr. 




Cr. 




Inventory 


. $42,373 34 


Salaries and wages . 


. SI, 596 00 


Admission fees 


200 00 


Heat, light, and power 


207 12 


Membership fees 


125 00 


Furnishings and incidental re- 


Income from investments . 


1,763 65 


pairs .... 


161 12 


Miscellaneous . 


287 62 


Nursing .... 


165 00 






Medicines 


33 02 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


372 43 




. $2,534 69 






Inventory 


. 42,214 92 




$44,749 61 


$44,749 61 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000; value of investments, $42,214.92. 



LADIES' CHARITABLE SOCIETY OF AMESBURY, Amesbury. (Incor- 
porated 1887.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. Ella M. Childs, President; Helen E. H. Douglass, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 

To aid the Protestant poor of Amesbury. 
Number of families aided during year, 37. 



Dr. 



$468 95 



Cr. 



Income from investments 


. $355 70 


Provisions and supplies 


. $448 66 


Members' dues . 


51 50 


Income invested . 


20 29 


G. A. R. Post 122 


10 00 






Crown Theatre . 


5 00 






Church collections 


43 75 






Total current receipts 


. $465 95 




Cash on hand at beginning of y 


ear 3 00 







$468 95 



Value of investments, $9,305.29. 



Amherst. 

AMHERST HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, Pleasant St., North Amherst. 
(Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for j^ear ending January 1, 1915. 

Walter D. Cowls, President; Forester P. Ainsworth, Secretary; 
Caroline T. Hunt, Treasurer; Mrs. Mary Caroline Leach, 
Superintendent, 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Home for American women, not less than sixty-five years of 
age, residents of Amherst and Sunderland. Admission fee, $400. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 
Number aided during year, 8. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$400 00 

820 34 

1,298 64 

79 88 


$2,598 86 
46 72 


$2,645 58 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. $577 00 


Provisions and supplies 


588 63 


Heat, light, and power 


119 26 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 81 85 


Telephone 


33 16 


Taxes .... 


161 25 


Funeral expenses 


177 00 


Interest .... 


56 00 


Miscellaneous . 


278 49 


Total current expenses 


. $2,072 64 


Cash deposited . 


400 00 


Cash on hand . 


172 94 



$2,645 58 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,600; value of investments, $15,407.74. 



Andover. 
ANDOVER GUILD, 10 Brook St., Andover. (Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Lewis H. Homer, President; Mrs. Bernard M. Allen, Secretary; 
Frederic G. Moore, Treasurer; Frances E. Baier, Superintendent. 

Educational and philanthropic work in the town of Andover. 
Sewing, millinery, cooking, and dressmaking; sloyd and basketry; 
gymnasium. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number aided during year, 258, viz., 167 paying, 63 partly 
paying, 28 free; families aided, 18. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Relief work 
Membership fees 
Rent . . . " . 
Entertainments, sales, etc. . 
Miscellaneous . 


$2,627 05 

130 09 

135 87 

32 30 

280 17 

7 00 


Cr. 

Salaries and wages ... 
Printing, postage, and office 
supplies .... 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 

Relief 

Class and club work . 
Entertainments, etc. . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand .... 


$1,496 70 

82 96 
397 73 

94 41 
174 54 
762 41 
214 37 

11 08 


Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of yeai 


$3,212 48 
45 81 




$3,234 20 
24 09 




$3,258 29 


$3,258 29 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$9,000. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY 



[P. D. 17. 



ANDOVER HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE, 4 Punchard Ave., Andover. (In- 
corporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1915, 

Frederic S. Boutwell, President; Mrs. Ida M. McCurdy, Secre- 
tary; David Shaw, Treasurer; Mrs. Mary C. Lewis, Matron. 

Home for women, not less than sixty years of age, natives of 
Andover or residents of Andover for not less than ten years prior 
to application. Admission fee, $200. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 4. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 



S41 00 
2,394 10 



$2,435 10 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$877 03 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


6 75 


Pro-visions and supplies 


623 46 


Heat, light, and power 


250 35 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


83 50 


Miscellaneous .... 


314 13 


Total current expenses 


S2,155 22 


Income transferred to capital 


279 88 




S2,435 10 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,796.48; value of investments, S56,412.71. 



Arlington. 

ORDER OF ST. ANNE (ST. JOHN'S HOUSE FOR CHILDREN), 181 Apple- 
ton St., Arlington Heights. (Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for j-ear ending December 31, 1914. 

Sister Etheldred, President and Superintendent; ^Yilliam Odlin, 
Secretary; Sister Anne, Treasurer. 

Religious, charitable, and educational. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 25, viz., 7 paying, 7 partly paying, 
11 free. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,510 10 

Subscriptions and donations . 16,361 00 

From publication . . . 474 12 

From sales .... 550 52 

Total current receipts . . S18,895 74 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,142 96 



$21,038 70 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


Sl,076 60 


Printing, postage, and oflBce 


J 


supplies 


841 92 


Provisions and supplies 


3,146 29 


Carfare and express . 


174 51 


Heat, light, and power 


973 80 


Furnishings and incidental re 




pairs .... 


1,083 59 


Building fund . 


8,610 00 


Interest and taxes . 


738 59 


Clothing 


374 11 


Doctors and drugs . 


462 39 


Chapel and grounds . 


390 94 


Miscellaneous . 


19 66 


Total current expenses . 


$17,892 40 


Cash on hand . 


3,146 30 




$21,038 70 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate jpurposes, 
$32,946; amount of mortgage on same, $7,500. 



SYMMES ARLINGTON HOSPITAL, off Summer St., Arlington. (Incor- 
porated 1902.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

H. A. Phinney, President; E. A. Ryder, Secretary; J. L. 
Taylor, Treasurer; Miss Nora A. Brown, Superintendent. 

General hospital and training school for nurses. 

Number of paid employees, 14. 

Number aided during year, 284, viz., 58 paying, 204 partly 
paying, 22 free. 



Dr. 
Hospital earnings 
Interest .... 
Subscriptions and donations 



$11,132 25 

10 25 

4,168 65 



$15,311 15 



Cr. 



Operating expenses: 



Administrative expenses 


$764 28 


Professional care of patients . 


3,661 54 


Department expenses 


8,957 00 


Uncollectible accounts charged 




off 


564 20 


Corporation expenses 


56 48 


Total current expenses . 


$14,003 50 


Building, furniture, and fixtures . 


709 69 


Cash on hand .... 


597 96 




$15,311 15 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$45,886.53; value of investments, $200. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Attleboro. 

THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OP ATTLEBORO, INCORPORATED, 
Room 207, Bronson Building, Park St., Attleboro. (Incorporated 
1915.) 

Report for six months ending October 1, 1915. 

Clelland J. McClatchey, President; William L. King, Secretary; 
Charles C. Wilmarth, Treasurer; Margaret E. Todd, Superin- 
tendent. 

To aid in systematizing the charities of Attleboro, to check 
indiscriminate giving, and to restore families and individuals to 
a self-supporting basis. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of families aided during year, 77. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 



$2,960 15 



$2,960 15 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $499 98 
Printing, postage, office supplies, 

provisions, and supplies . . 103 62 

Rent 144 50 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 114 73 

Relief to families . . . 474 16 

Total current expenses . . $1,336 99 

Cash on hand .... 1,623 16 

82,960 15 



ATTLEBOROUGH HOSPITAL (OPERATING STURDY MEMORIAL HOS- 
PITAL), Park St., Attleboro. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending February 28, 1915. 

Joseph L. Sweet, President; F. G. Simmonds, Secretary; 
Edward L. Gowen, Treasurer; Miss G. G. Rice, Superintendent. 

General hospital. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number aided during year, 260, viz., 209 paying, 29 partly 
paying, 22 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Hospital receipts 
Miscellaneous . 


. $11,260 00 

. 16,823 63 

5,651 29 

. 6,938 64 

256 59 


Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 
supplies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 

Expense of new building . 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand .... 


$4,520 01 

55 25 
3,379 82 
1,217 32 


Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning c 
year .... 


. $40,930 15 

f 

. 2,706 87 


254 68 

18,043 06 

1,283 84 




$28,753 98 

12,375 80 

2,507 24 




$43,637 02 


$43,637 02 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 7 

Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$85,000; value of investments, $67,793.80. 



Avon. 

THE LUTHERAN ORPHANS' HOME BOARD, Main St., Avon. (Incor- 
porated 1906.) 

Report for year ending April 12, 1915. 

Rev. C. F. Johansson, President; Rev. H. Myreen, Secretary; 
C. W. O. Lawson, Treasurer; Miss Amalia Rabenius, Matron. 

Home for orphan and destitute children (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 45, viz., 6 paying, 2 partly paying, 
37 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Guardians .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$748 12 

4,766 99 

705 00 

$6,220 11 
462 69 



$6,682 70 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
Water rent 

Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Interest, insurance, and taxes 
Improvements . 
Traveling expenses and telephone 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$1,387 68 

394 60 
2,302 61 
135 79 
196 61 
560 56 
838 53 
365 91 
105 63 
348 81 



$6,636 73 
45 97 



$6,682 70 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$35,000; amount of mortgage on same, $9,500. 



Baldwinville. 

THE HOSPITAL COTTAGES FOR CHILDREN, Baldwinville. (Incor- 
porated 1882.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1915. 

Herbert S. Morley, President; Robert N. Wallis, Secretary; 
George L. Clark, Treasurer; Dr. H. W. Page, Superintendent. 

The care, training, and treatment of diseased, maimed, feeble- 
minded, destitute, and orphan children (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 47. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 111; number of 
free patients (excluding public charges), 11; total number of 
hospital days during year, 37,489; number of free days (ex- 
cluding those given to public charges), 3,358. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 


$2,995 24 


Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 


$16,574 86 


Payments by city, town, or State 


13.776 99 


Groceries and provisions . 


5,764 54 


Voluntary contributions . 


3,928 91 


Clothing .... 


369 76 


Interest, dividends, and rentals . 


15.381 58 


Heat, light, power, and water 


4,017 90 


Unrestricted legacies 


11.047 20 


Medicine, etc. . 


194 22 


Cash sales .... 


2,010 47 


General expenses 


1,625 94 






Hay and grain . 


2,241 12 






Total hospital receipts . 


$49,140 39 


Furnishings 


744 44 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Ordinary repairs 


790 32 


year ..... 


7,615 68 


Extraordinary repairs 


520 62 






Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital expenses . 


158 00 




$33,001 72 






Income invested 


5,200 23 






Legacies invested 


11,047 20 






Cash on hand . 


7,506 92 




$56,756 07 


$56,756 07 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$84,295; value of investments, $357,617.47. 



Barre. 
STETSON HOME, Barre. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

William A. Pevear, President and Treasurer; Frederic 
Pevear, Secretary; Charles L. Cutting, Superintendent. 
Home for orphan boys. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 
Number aided during 3^ear, 40. 



S. 



Dr. 




Cr. 






Income from investments . 


. $16,687 53 


Salaries and wages . 




$4,839 10 


Farm products 


1,689 89 


Printing, postage, and 
supplies 


office 


117 92 






Total current receipts . 


. $18,377 42 


Provisions and supplies 




1,593 18 


Cash on hand at beginning of 


Heat, light, and power 




612 10 


year .... 


. 7,442 99 


Furnishings and incidental re- 








pairs . 




1,441 25 






Clothing 




730 24 






Farm supplies . 




1,842 67 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 




1,047 54 




$12,224 00 






Income invested 




991 25 






Cash on hand . 




12,605 16 




$25,820 41 


$25,820 41 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$23,735; value of investments, $332,618.33. 



Part II.l 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Beverly. 

BEVERLY FEMALE CHARITABLE SOCIETY, Beverly. (Incorporated 

1836.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Miss Elizabeth D. Howe, President; Mrs. George A. Wood- 
bury, Secretary; Miss Louisa B. Kilham, Treasurer. 
To aid the deserving poor of Beverly. 
Number aided during year, 3L 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Rebate national bank tax . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



SlOl 00 

500 00 

181 40 

31 16 

S813 56 
195 60 

Sl,009 16 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies . . . . . 
Beneficiaries .... 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand .... 



SO 45 


275 


00 


S275 


45 


500 00 


233 


71 



Sl,009 16 



BEVERLY FUEL SOCIETY, 155 Cabot St., Beverly. (Incorporated 1888.) 
Report for year ending September 1, 1915. 

Patrick J. Lynch, President; Benjamin A. Patch, Secretary; 
Charles F. Lee, Treasurer. 

Distribution of fuel to the worthy poor of Beverly. 
Number aided during year, 92. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Income from investments 

Rebate bank tax . . . . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year. 



SllO 00 

365 00 

20 71 

$495 71 
151 54 

S647 25 



Cr. 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies SI 25 

Fuel . . . . '. . 511 34 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



S512 59 
134 66 



S647 25 



Value of investments, $9,300.85. 



BEVERLY HOSPITAL CORPORATION, corner Herrick and Heather Sts., 
Beverly. (Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

John L. Saltonstall, President; Roland W. Boyden, Secretary; 
Augustus P. Loring, Treasurer; Alice C. S. Cushman, R.N., 
Superintendent. 

General hospital. 

Number of paid officers or employees, oL 



10 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Number aided during year: in institution, 1,148, viz., 632 
paying, 58 partly paying, 458 free; outside institution, 482, viz., 
93 paying, 126 partly paying, 263 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 



$24,454 30 

21,003 66 

2,284 62 

2,867 75 


$50,610 33 



Cr. 

Administration . . , $19,766 39 

Department .... 2,176 72 

General house .... 8,823 49 

Provisions .... 13,883 85 

Medical and surgical supplies . 4,255 66 

Total current expenses . . $48,906 11 

Deficit at beginning of year . 1,704 22 

$50,610 33 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 

$173,239.78; value of investments, $78,231.28. 



FISHER CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 171 Cabot St., Beverly. (Incorporated 

1809.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

William R. Driver, President; Arthur K. Story, Secretary; 
Rodney C. Larcom, Treasurer. 

To aid the worthy poor of Beverly. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number aided during year, 126. 



Dr. 

Income from investments , 

Tax rebate on national 

stock . . . . 



bank 



Total current receipts . 
Loans to incom^ 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$2,647 79 



227 17 



$2,874 96 
27,911 66 



2,177 69 



$32,964 31 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Trustees' orders 

Bonds purchased 

Interest .... 

Beverly National Bank note 

Redeposited in banks 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$252 70 

1,793 55 

18,887 50 

297 03 

8,500 00 

225 39 

19 64 

$29,975 81 

527 56 

2,460 94 

$32,964 31 



Value of investments, $52,944.06. 



NEW ENGLAND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR DEAF MUTES, 283 Elliott 
St., Beverly. (Incorporated 1879.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Dudley L. Pickman, President; Albert Boyden, Clerk; Benja- 
min A. Patch, Treasurer; Louise Upham, Superintendent. 
Education of the deaf (boys and girls). 
Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 
Number aided during year, 34, all free. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



11 



Dr. 
State of New Hampshire . 
Subscriptions and donations 
State of Massachusetts 
Income from investments . 
Return premium insurance policy 
Collections 
Rent of farm . 
Tuition .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Temporary loans 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



$1,200 00 

1,428 50 

3,500 00 

2,319 47 

11 52 

994 75 

240 00 

50 00 

47 82 

$9,792 06 
2,450 00 

3 61 

$12,245 67 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $4,754 48 
Printing, postage, and office 

supplies . . . . 139 34 
Provisions and supplies . . 3,062 12 
Heat, light, and power . . 883 06 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 775 13 

Insurance . . . . 52 10 

Repaid loans .... 2,400 00 

Sewer and moth taxes . . 145 51 

Interest on loans . . . 27 12 

Total current expenses . . $12,238 86 

Cash on hand .... 6 81 

$12,245 67 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,000; value of investments, $75,846.23. 



OLD LADIES' 



HOME SOCIETY, 12 Lovett St., Beverly. 
1885.) 



(Incorporated 



Report for year ending May 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Lizzie F. Creesy, President; Mrs. Mary A. Norwood, 
Secretary; Edward S. Webber, Treasurer; Mrs. Hattie A. Shaw, 
Matron. 

Home for aged women, at least sixty years of age, residents of 
Beverly for ten years. Admission fee, $100. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 7. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$200 00 

604 20 

2,750 00 

1,472 43 

20 65 


$5,047 28 

200 00 

34 26 


$5,281 54 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Funeral charges 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$1,029 


32 


15 


51 


668 


20 


196 44 


397 


34 


196 


00 


108 


82 



$2,611 63 

2,500 00 

169 91 

$5,281 54 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,000; value of investments, $31,310. 



12 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Boston. 

ADAMS NERVINE ASYLUM, 990 Centre St., Jamaica Plain. (Incorpo- 
rated 1877.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Henry Parkman, President; Bernard C. Weld, Secretary; 
Edward W. Grew, Treasurer; Rachael Bourke, Matron and 
Superintendent of Nurses. 

Care and relief of indigent, debilitated, and nervous persons, 
not insane, inhabitants of Massachusetts, and of other persons 
not indigent. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 63. 

Number aided during year, 222, viz., 63 paying, 92 partly 
paying, 67 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$20,776 99 

38,248 02 

366 42 

$59,391 43 

5,953 46 



$65,344 89 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Water and ice . 
Medicine and apparatus . 
Stable .... 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$21,874 71 

162 87 

18,129 60 

6,213 98 

9,173 71 
1,301 01 

685 82 
1,285 75 

615 01 
1,974 31 

$61,416 77 
3,928 12 



$65,344 89 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$120,000; value of investments, $842,768.97. 



AMERICAN INVALID AID SOCIETY OF BOSTON, 73 Tremont St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1915. 

Hon. Louis C. Southard, President; Mrs. E. W. Waite, 
Secretary; A. B. Upham, Treasurer. 

To assist incipient consumptives, and others who are in danger 
of becoming tuberculous, to recover their health. Incurable 
cases are occasionally aided. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 153. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



13 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $2,110 44 

Income from investments . . 28 00 

Total current receipts . .. $2,138 44 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 287 87 



$2,426 31 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$530 00 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies 


78 60 


Rent 


371 25 


Telephone , . . . 


44 75 


Aid to invalids .... 


1.200 75 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


37 55 


Total current expenses 


$2,262 90 


Cash on hand . . . . 


163 41 




$2,426 31 



Value of investments, $291.38. 

ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE, 51 Carver St., Boston. (Incorporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Huntington Smith, President; Mrs. Arthur T. Cabot, 
Secretary; Livingston Gushing, Treasurer; Mrs. M. A. Kelly, 
Matron. 

The care of homeless and neglected animals. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 24. 

Number of animals aided during year, 43,690. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments and 
rents ..... 
Annual fair .... 
Bonds matured and sold . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 



year 



$3,950 50 
17,337 09 

2,231 25 
5,577 11 
3,675 83 
1,375 52 


$34,147 30 
7,987 90 


$42,135 20 



and office 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Taxes, water, etc. 
Repairs . 
Animal Rescue League branches 
Ambulance and cars 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Donations invested . 
Cash on hand . 



$18,055 34 

1,407 04 
1,039 36 
1,033 39 
961 94 
3,684 32 
1,324 48 
1,444 53 
1,782 10 

$30,732 50 
2,000 00 
9,402 70 

$42,135 20 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$62,585.09; value of investments, $47,159.54. 



ARMY NURSE ASSOCIATION OP MASSACHUSETTS, G. A. R. Head- 
quarters, State House, Boston. (Incorporated 1897.) 

Report for year ending June 1, 1915. 

Mrs. Fanny T. Hazen, President; Mrs. Margaret Hamilton, 
Secretary; Mrs. Lovisa B. Downs, Treasurer. 

To assist needy nurses in Massachusetts who served in the 
army hospitals during the civil war. 



14 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 
Cash on hand 
Subscriptions and donations 



$148 88 
121 00 



$269 88 



Cr. 



Aid . 
Miscellaneovis 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$122 33 
14 84 



$137 17 
132 71 



$269 88 



ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OP BOSTON, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1881.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

John F. Moors, President; Fred R. Johnson, Secretary and 
General Secretary; Henry B. Cabot, Treasurer. 

To raise the needy above relief, diminish pauperism, aid the 
poor to help themselves, secure harmonious action of the charities 
of Boston, etc. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 56. (Central office and 
18 districts.) 

Number aided during year, 4,847 families and 1,056 homeless 
men dealt with; expenditure from special relief account, $44,- 
057.60. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Ofl&ces sublet .... 
Directory of Charities 
^liscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 



$43,065 77 


1,000 00 


7,849 72 


1,071 00 


1,823 30 


425 69 


$55,235 48 


2,584 59 


$57,820 07 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $43,092 73 
Printing, postage, and office 

supplies .... 3,573 37 
Rent, care of offices, heat, light, 

and power .... 3,951 22 

Telephone .... 2,806 23 

Director^' of Charities . . 1,489 76 

Rent for offices sublet . . 1,071 00 

Miscellaneous .... 1,835 76 

$57,820 07 



Value of investments, $166,024.79. 



ASSOCIATION FOR THE WORK OF MERCY IN THE DIOCESE OF MAS- 
SACHUSETTS, 244 Townsend St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1895.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Miss Catherine A. Codman, President; Mrs. Malcolm Storer, 
Secretary; Leverett S. Tuckerman, Treasurer; Miss Mary H. 
Burgess, Head Worker. 

Rescue and relief of fallen women, and charitable work con- 
nected therewith. Without restriction or admission fees. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 50, viz., 15 pa\ing, 
24 partly paying, 11 free; outside institution, 36. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



15 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,098 01 

4,969 04 

748 29 

8 05 


$6,823 39 
800 00 
499 65 


$8,123 04 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




$2,037 04 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




plies .... 


. 


117 45 


Provisions and supplies 


. 


3.561 38 


Heat, light, and power 




552 85 


Interest on mortgage 




45 00 


Furnishing and incidental repairs 


407 88 


Insurance 


. 


301 39 


Outside work . 


• 


910 04 


Total current expenses . 


$7,933 03 


Income invested 


. 


139 29 


Cash on hand . 




50 72 



$8,123 04 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$17,250; value of investments, $16,929.19. 



ASSOCIATION OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH FOR 
WORKS OF MERCY, Baker St., West Roxbury. (Incorporated 1871.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Eev. Adolf H. Biewend, President; Rev. J. F. Pfeiffer, Secre- 
tary; Emil Reichenbach, Treasurer; Rev. Theo S. Keyl, Superin- 
tendent; Mrs. Theo S. Keyl, Matron. 

To aid orphans and half-orphans of three years and over 
(German Lutherans preferred), under the name of the Martin 
Luther Orphans' Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number aided during year, 39, viz., 11 partly paying, 28 free. 



Dr. 




Cr. 




From beneficiaries . 


$1,106 71 


Salaries and wages . 


$5,561 93 


Subscriptions and donations 


2,618 16 


Printing, postage, and office 




Income from investments . 


319 24 


supplies 


100 23 


Injcome from farm . 


1,115 86 


Provisions and supplies 


3,030 96 


Income from cemetery 


721 50 


Heat, light, and power 


649 04 


Income from printing depart- 




Furnishings and incidental re- 




ment 


4,688 94 


pairs .... 


297 96 


Board 


659 00 


Farm expenses 


506 11 


Miscellaneous .... 


254 88 


Printing department 


1,396 07 






Water taxes . 
Fire insurance . 


76 00 
83 30 


Total current receipts . 


$11,484 29 


Cash on hand at beginning of 


665 10 


Miscellaneous . 


145 79 


year ..... 








Total current expenses . 


$11,847 39 






Cash on hand . 


302 00 




$12,149 39 


$12,149 39 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$25,000; value of investments held by trustees for benefit of 
society, $14,164. 



16 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



ASSOCIATION OF THE HAWTHORNE CLUB, 3 and 4 Garland St., Boston. 
Hawthorne Club Country House, Weymouth. (Incorporated 1906.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Miss Lilian V. Robinson, President; Mrs. Robert Grant, 
Secretary; Charles E. Stratton, Treasurer; Miss Ellen Meehan, 
Superintendent of Country House. 

Educational and social work in the neighborhood (especially 
among children). Classes in industrial training, vacation for 
children, and maintenance of summer playground. 

Number of paid employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 200 in classes, 740 in playground. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $4,449 19 

Income from investments . . 164 93 

Checks cancelled . . . 60 00 

Total current receipts . . $4,674 12 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 3,032 45 



$7,706 57 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $816 39 

Printing 56 00 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,158 53 

Rent 875 00 

Heat and light . . . . 100 77 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 498 72 

Miscellaneous . . . . 127 00 

Total current expenses . . $3,632 41 

Cash on hand .... 4,074 16 

$7,706 57 



Value of investments, $1,443. 



AUXILIARY RELIEF BRANCH OF THE RUSSIAN AND POLISH JEWISH 
CENTRAL COMMITTEE AT JERUSALEM, 5 Stillman St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending September 26, 1915. 

Hyman Kaplan, President; Rabbi Solomon J. Friederman, 
Secretary; Isaac H. Schur, Treasurer. 
Assisting needy Russian and Polish Jews at Jerusalem. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 
Employs a collector on commission. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations . $5,808 98 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 143 32 



$5,952 30 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $1,777 53 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 31 60 

Forwarded to Jerusalem . . 3,900 00 

Traveling expenses . . . 170 90 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$5,880 03 
72 27 



$5,952 30 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



17 



BARNARD MEMORIAL, 10 Warrenton St., Boston. (Incorporated 1863.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1915. 

John S. Richardson, President; Edward A. Talbot, Secretary; 
Frank T. Vose, Treasurer; Rev. Paul H. Drake, Superintendent. 

Moral, religious, and industrial training of children by means 
of classes, meetings, and personal work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, about 125. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments 
Janitor service to city kinder 

garten .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$600 00 1 


147 


47 


251 


53 


5,192 


52 


300 00 


172 86 


$6,664 


38 


794 


44 


$7,458 


82 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies .... 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$2,585 08 

460 06 
513 56 
312 05 
61 07 
218 24 

$4,150 06 
2,072 35 
1,236 41 

$7,458 82 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
,000; value of investments, $116,925.94. 



BENEFICENT SOCIETY OF THE NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF 
MUSIC, New England Conservatory, Huntington Ave., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1885.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1915. 

Mrs. Charles H. Bond, President; Mrs, Chauncey B. Allen, 
Secretary; Mrs. Henry M. Dunham, Treasurer. 

To aid needy and deserving students of the conservatory by 
lending them money without interest. 

Number aided during year, 14. 



Dr. 

Returned loans . . . . $831 25 

Income from investments 239 01 

Annual dues and subscriptions 597 00 

Total current receipts . $1,667 26 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,662 94 



$3,330 20 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies $19 10 

Loans to beneficiaries . 1,689 00 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,708 10 
1,622 10 



$3,330 20 



Value of investments, $5,730. 



18 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



THE BERKELEY INFIRMARY, 44 Dwight St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1905.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Samuel Breck, Acting President; Adelaide E. Breck, Secretary; 
George H. Nutting, Treasurer; Annie I. Hollings, Superintendent, 

To care for the sick poor, irrespective of nationality or creed. 
To advance the knowledge of preventive medicine and of the 
care of disease among the poor. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 782, viz., 623 partly paying, 159 
free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Gushing Hospital, in account 
Associated Charities . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
First National Bank loan . 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



S891 40 

2,212 59 

82 00 1 

36 00 

12 25 


S3,234 24 
500 00 
200 80 

1 


S3,935 04 ! 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$1,506 15 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies .... 


173 35 


Telephone 


93 93 


House expense . 


243 03 


Heat, light, and power 


225 21 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


49 89 


Medicines and medical supplies 


848 12 


Instruments, etc. 


186 55 


Interest .... 


275 10 


Hospital and loan fund 


150 00 


:Miscellaneous . 


180 00 


Total current expenses 


$3,931 33 


Cash on hand . 


3 71 




$3,935 04 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
^,000; amount of mortgage on same, $5,500. 



BETHANY UNION FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 14 Worcester St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Arthur E. Mason, President; James H. Whitman, Secretary 
and Treasurer; Miss Ruth E. Hersey, Superintendent. 

To furnish a safe and comfortable home for Protestant young 
women earning small wages. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 62. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



19 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
On account of principal of notes 
received .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



Cr. 



$8,493 93 


Salaries and wages . 


$2,569 48 


1,543 59 


Printing, postage, and office 




276 09 


supplies .... 


77 75 




Provisions and supplies 


3,698 68 


100 00 


Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 


1,442 14 






$10,413 61 


pairs ..... 


1,150 65 




Laundry ..... 


232 12 


2,616 77 


Aid to outside beneficiaries 


265 00 




Interest on mortgage note 


150 75 




Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


164 79 




S9,751 36 




Paid on account of principal of 






mortgage .... 


700 00 




Cash on hand .... 


2,579 02 



$13,030 38 



$13,030 38 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$27,100; amount of mortgage on same, $3,000; value of invest- 
ments, $6,100. 



BOARD OF MINISTERIAL AID, 



14 Beacon St. 
1869.) 



Boston. (Incorporated 



Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Artkur H. Wellman, President; Arthur C. Farley, Secretary; 
Charles L. Ziegler, Treasurer. 

To aid aged, disabled, or needy ministers of the Orthodox 
Congregational denomination in the Commonwealth, and the 
widows and children of such ministers. 

Number aided during year, 52. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
From loan .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



S4,080 41 

3,141 42 

596 78 


S7,818 
1,532 


61 
29 


$9,350 90 



Cr. 



Printing, postage, and office sup- 




pUes ..... 


$237 12 


Grants in aid .... 


7,926 25 


Payment of loan and interest 


600 00 


Contributions to New York 




Society 


40 00 


Total current expenses . 


$8,803 37 


Cash on hand .... 


547 53 




$9,350 90 



Value of investments, $63,606.62. 



BOSTON ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS, 4 Joy St., Boston. (Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Arthur K. Stone, M.D., President; Miss Isabel F. Hyams, 
Clerk; Seymour H. Stone, Secretary; George S. Mumford, 
Treasurer. 



20 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



To promote a careful study of conditions regarding tuberculosis 
in Boston; to educate public opinion as to the causes and 
prevention of tuberculosis; to arouse general interest in securing 
adequate provision for the proper care of tuberculosis patients in 
their homes or hospitals and sanatoria. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 94, viz., 21 paying, 42 partly pay- 
ing, 31 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Laundry 

Carting and express . 
Red Cross seals 
Rent .... 
Massachusetts Anti-Tuberculosis 

League 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year .... 



$2,498 60 


7,927 


50 


472 


52 


2 


49 


1 


13 


2,077 99 1 


14 


59 


854 


66 


134 


60 


$13,984 08 


3,197 93 


$17,182 


01 1 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . . 


$6,202 50 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies . ., . 


1,801 20 


Provisions and supplies 


2,706 82 


Rent 


691 74 


Heat, light, and power 


379 68 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


388 32 


Red Cross seals 


553 50 


Massachusetts Anti-Tuberculosis 




League .... 


351 30 


Construction .... 


67 97 


Traveling expenses . 


100 00 



Miscellaneous .... 1,075 16 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$14,318 19 
2,863 82 

$17,182 01 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$23,797.89; value of investments, $7,542.25. 



BOSTON BAPTIST SOCIAL UNION, Ashburton PL, Boston. (Incorpo- 
rated 1900.) 

Report for year ending March 1, 1915. 

Henry W. Newhall, President; Ray Greene Huling, Secretary; 
William G. Burbeck, Treasurer. 

Mary Anna Home, Shirley, Mass., where summer vacations are 
given mothers and children. Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. 
work; also relief work and institutional work at Ruggles Street 
Baptist Church. Ford Hall Sunday evening meetings for work- 
ing men and their families and working women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 23. 

Number aided during year, 1,023; attendance at summer 
school, 4,297. 



PartlLl CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



21 



Dr. 
Income from investments . 
Trustees .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$490 13 
29,668 63 



$30,158 76 



885 18 



$31,043 94 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$13,140 03 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies 


189 85 


Provisions and supplies 


643 96 


Rent .... 


500 00 


Music .... 


1,937 00 


Heat, light, and power 


1,668 72 


Furnishings and incidental re 




pairs .... 


383 00 


Relief fund, etc. 


1,890 00 


Women's work 


80 00 


Y. W. C. A. . 


863 32 


Mary Anna Home, etc. 


1,591 48 


Ford Hall meetings . 


3,415 88 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$26,303 24 

3,950 57 

790 13 

$31,043 94 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$154,000; value of investments, $1,135,602.25. 



BOSTON BRANCH BARON DE HIRSCH FUND, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending January 27, 1915. 

Ferdinand Strauss, President; Edward E. Norton, Secretary; 
A. C. Ratshesky, Treasurer; Mrs, Martha M. Silverman, 
Superintendent. 

To instruct Jewish immigrants, assist them to obtain employ- 
ment, and to provide for their removal and settlement in places 
outside of Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 862, viz., 5 partly paying, 857 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Removal committee . 
Miscellaneous . 



$117 20 

600 00 

139 44 

150 00 

7 34 



Total current receipts . $1,013 98 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,031 71 



$2,045 69 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$128 04 


Printing, postage, and office sup 




pUes .... 


42 50 


Transportation . 


333 23 


Tools, furniture, etc. . 


91 38 


Aid 


457 20 


Treasurer's bond 


7 50 


Total current expenses 


$1,059 85 


Income invested 


539 44 


Cash on hand . 


446 40 



$2,045 69 



Value of investments, $3,727.53. 



22 



STATE BOAED OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON CHILDREN'S AID SOCIETY, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1865.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Horatio A. Lamb, President; J. Prentice Murphy, General 
Secretary; I. Tucker Burr, Treasurer. 

Provides for exposed, destitute, and wayward children; studies 
questions relating to children; promotes needed legislation and 
encourages co-operation among child-helping societies; takes 
juvenile offenders on probation; undertakes oversight of children 
in their own homes; places libraries in families. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 26. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 418; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in full, 
^0; in part, 162; not reimbursed, 187. Monthly average number 
of children under supervision in foster homes, 251. Number of 
placing-out visitors, 7 (2 giving half time). 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities 

Income from investments 
From charitable societies 
From overseers of poor 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 
Capital appropriated to income 



$8,907 


69 


26,989 


54 


2,950 00 1 


19,352 


19 


1,493 


76 


1,408 


56 


612 


95 


$61,714 69 


2,964 54 


$64,679 


23 1 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$25,003 55 


Printing and office supplies 


1,455 46 


Board, clothing, and medical care 


29,252 80 


Transportation 


3,382 70 


Heat, light, and care of office 


869 03 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs 


313 46 


Postage, express, telephone, and 




telegraph .... 


1,929 63 


Home libraries 


377 48 


Public accountant 


392 75 


Refunds and donations 


684 00 


Miscellaneous .... 


1,018 37 




$64,679 23 



Value of investments, $307,118.59. 



BOSTON CHILDREN'S FRIEND SOCIETY, 48 Rutland St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1834.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Costello C. Converse, President; Mrs. Frank R. Thomas, 
Clerk; William C. Chick, Treasurer; Carrington Howard, General 
Secretary. 

Needy and neglected children provided with home life in 
private families when impossible to readjust conditions at home;. 
children given oversight in their own homes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



23 



Number of children cared for in foster homes and schools for 
special training, 192; the society reimbursed for expense of these, 
exclusive of supervision: in full, 39; in part, 139; not reim- 
bursed, 14. Monthly average number of children under super- 
vision in foster homes, 134 J. Number of placing-out visitors, 3. 
Number of children supervised in their own homes, including 23 
returned to their homes from placing-out department, 74. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Entertainment 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Investments sold 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



S6,237 


66 


8,416 


98 


5,237 83 1 


1,292 


23 


103 


67 


S21,28S 


37 


4,000 


00 


2,996 


15 


1,614 


13 


$29,898 65 



Ct. 



Salaries and wages . 


S6,536 32 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies 


932 93 


Board and clothing of children 


15,031 19 


Furnishings and incidental re 




pairs .... 


80 95 


Travel of children and visitors 


1,226 23 


Medical and dental service 


456 37 


Telephone 


282 38 


Advertising 


253 20 


Miscellaneous . 


613 16 


Total current expenses . 


$25,412 73 


Income invested 


2,925 00 


Cash on hand . 


1,560 92 




$29,898 65 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$30,000; value of investments, $133,916.20. 



THE BOSTON CITY HOSPITAL, 818 Harrison Ave., Boston; the South 
Department for Contagious Diseases, 745 Massachusetts Ave., Boston; 
the ReUef Stations, Haymarket Sq., Boston, and 14 Porter St., East 
Boston; the Convalescent Home, 2150 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester. 
(Incorporated 1880.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1915. 

A. Shuman, President; Joseph P. Manning, Secretary; John J. 
Dowling, M.D., Superintendent and Medical Director. 

For the temporary relief of sick or injured persons. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 770. 

Number aided: in institution at beginning of year, 930; 
number received during year, 18,149; number leaving during 
year, 18,108; number at end of year, 971. Total number of 
ward patients aided during year, 19,079, viz., 6,061 paying and 
partly paying; 13,018 free. Number of out-patients treated, 
43,891, viz., 3,227 paying, 40,664 free. 



24 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

City appropriation . 

Transfer from reserve fund for 
Southampton wards 

Transfer from reserve fund 

State patients 

City and town patients . 

Private patients 

Insurance cases 

Orthopedic appliances 

Collection of board of health for 
contagious cases at hospital 

Interest from investments 

Gifts on account of patients 

Revenue from estate, Massa- 
chusetts Ave. and Northamp- 
ton St 

Sale of old material, including 
machinery, etc. . 

Interest .... 

Commission on automatic tele- 
phone .... 

Birth registration . 

Conscience money . 



$625,000 00 

10,000 00 
48.600 00 
35,035 50 
17,629 43 
30,757 57 
10,708 18 
226 85 

30,928 37 

1,964 00 

17 00 



720 27 

605 63 
67 30 

26 52 

21 00 

1 00 



Total current receipts . . $812,308 62 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,812 95 



$815,121 57 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies . 
Drugs and medicines 
Repairs and improvements 
Heating and lighting 
Printing, stationery, and post- 
age 

Total hospital expenses 
Paid to city collector i 



Unexpended balance carried for- 
ward to ensuing year: — 

Allowance for two 

ambulances . $7,000 00 

Allowance for new 
system of house 
records . 1,500 00 

Balance due on 

contracts . 3,805 37 



$298,305 57 

228,148 76 

55,851 94 

27,944 61 

53,449 57 

10,312 80 

$674,013 25 
128,802 95 

$802,816 20 



12,305 37 



$815,121 57 



Value of property owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$3,586,100; value of investments, $93,017.19. 



BOSTON COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, 47 Mt. Vernon St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Mrs. Arthur Berenson, President; Miss Anna S. Pelonsky, 
Secretary; Mrs. Max Mitchell, Treasurer. 

To further united efforts in the work of social betterment 
through religion, philanthropy, and education. Supplies two 
persons for probation work in Boston Juvenile Court and three 
persons for work among immigrants. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 705; juvenile court cases dealt 
with, 311. 



» These receipts, consisting of money from paying patients, revenue from estate, Massachu- 
setts Ave. and Northampton St., sale of old material, interest on bank deposits, commission on 
automatic telephone, birth registration fees, conscience money and the unexpended balance, 
amounting to $128,802.95, were paid to the city collector, and were not available for hospital 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



25 



Dr. 



Members' dues . 


$1,185 00 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,881 82 


Bequests .... 


200 00 


Benefit performance . 


2,570 55 


From sinking fund 


360 00 


Religious schools 


332 90 


Cake, cookbooks and guests 


12 70 


Interest .... 


15 13 



Total current receipts . $6,558 10 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 920 00 



$7,478 10 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$3,123 39 


I*rinting, postage, and oflBce sup- 




plies .... 


234 38 


Expense of benefit performance 


1,010 21 


Rent .... 


375 00 


Light .... 


9 50 


Religious schools 


655 77 


Board, clothes, and medical care 


182 87 


Delegate to national and New 




York conferences . 


100 00 


Members' meetings . 


128 63 


Telephone 


86 50 


Massachusetts State Federation 




dues .... 


22 45 


Boston City Federation dues 


2 00 


Conference of Charities and Cor- 




rection .... 


2 50 


Denver Hospital 


28 25 


Miscellaneous 


132 70 


Total current expenses 


$6,094 15 


Deposited in sinking fund . 


438 10 


Cash on hand . 


945 85 




$7,478 10 



BOSTON DISPENSARY, 25 Bennet St., Boston. (Incorporated 1801.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Edward R. Warren, President; Edward C. Streeter, M.D., 
Secretary; Ashton L. Carr, Treasurer; Michael M. Davis, Jr., 
Director. 

To afford medical advice and relief to the sick poor, provide 
medicines, and assist in educational and remedial efforts for the 
prevention of disease. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 107. 

Number of treatments given during year, 120,349; partly 
paying, 100,000; free, 20,000; individuals aided, about 35,000. 



Dr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$37,575 26 


Subscriptions and donations 


19,718 00 


Annuities and bequests to incomt 


; 2,950 00 


Income from investments . 


14,418 29 


Income from real estate 


300 00 


Payments for work done for othei 




agencies 


5,082 40 


Miscellaneous . 


126 53 


Total current receipts . 


$80,170 48 


Loans to income 


13,375 26 




$93,545 74 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$55,299 72 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies 




4,594 58 


Provisions and supplies 




16,444 61 


Heat, light, and power 




5,600 54 


Furnishings and incidental 


re- 




pairs .... 




2,676 18 


Drugs and chemicals 




8,349 18 


Miscellaneous . 




580 93 






$93,545 74 



26 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON EPISCOPAL CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 89 Franklin St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1784.) 

Report for year ending March 15, 1915. 

Francis W. Hunnewell, President; Charles E. Mason, Secre- 
tary; John S. Lawrence, Treasurer. 

The relief of persons who are or have been members of the 
society and their families, the widows and minor children of 
persons who at the time of their decease shall have been ministers 
of an Episcopal church in this Commonwealth, and of persons 
who belong to the Protestant Episcopal Church and are in- 
habitants of the city of Boston. 

Number of families aided, 58. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $6,640 47 

Cash on hand at beginning of j'ear 532 29 



$7,172 76 



Cr. 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
phes . . . . . 

Rent of safe . . . . 

Quarterly grants 
Special grants . . . . 

Total ciarrent expenses 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$6 25 

10 00 

5,570 00 

300 00 

55,886 25 

1,286 51 

S7,172 76 



Value of investments, $142,046.25. 

BOSTON FATHERLESS AND WIDOWS' SOCIETY, 1145 Old South Build- 
ing, Boston. (Incorporated 1837.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Mrs. Maria H. Gordon, President; Miss Emily L. Croswell, 
Secretary; Thomas J. Emery, Treasurer. 
To help widows and orphans. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number aided during year, 144. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $148 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,238 18 

Income from investments . 8,655 23 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$11,041 41 
2,766 56 



$13,807 97 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . $575 00 
Printing, postage, and office 

suppUes . . . . 54 50 
Box in Old Colony Safe Deposit 

vaults 20 00 

Accrued income on investments . 2 23 

Mortgage . . . 266 30 

To tnistees for distribution 9,506 00 

Miscellaneous . . . , . 3 42 

Total current expenses . . $10,427 45 

Cash on hand .... 3,380 52 

$13,807 97 



Value of investments, $154,125. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



27 



BOSTON FLOATING HOSPITAL, 54 Devonshire St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1901.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Edward W. Pope, Chairman of Trustees; William H. Brainerd, 
Clerk; George C. Lee, Treasurer; Miss Sarah A. Egan, R.N., 
Superintendent of Nurses. 

Care of children under five years suffering from summer dis- 
eases; instruction of mothers in care of children; training of 
doctors and nurses, and scientific study of children's diseases. 

Number of paid oflacers or employees, 142. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,356; total 
number of hospital days during year, 12,323, including 1,625 
mothers. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Voluntary contributions . 


. $44,652 74 


Administration 


Interest and dividends 


. 3,072 02 


Professional care of patients 


Miscellaneous . 


. 5,486 98 


Department expenses, general 
house and property expenses . 






Total receipts 


. $53,211 74 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




year . . ... 


. 1,802 63 


Total expenses 
Cash on hand . . . - . 




$55,014 37 





$8,281 52 
18,449 64 

20,234 58 
478 97 

$47,444 71 
7,569 66 

$55,014 37 



Value of investments, $99,560.63. 



BOSTON HEBREW LADIES' 
Boston. 



AID ASSOCIATION, 995 Washington St., 
(Incorporated 1898.) 



Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Annie Wilson, President; Julius Hirsch, Secretary; R. Bikofsky, 
Treasurer. 
To give pecuniary aid to the poor of the Hebrew faith. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number of families aided during year, 310. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
From raflBe .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$260 15 
97 80 



$357 95 
120 00 



$477 95 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies . . . . . 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . , . . 



$30 00 

20 00 

342 95 

35 00 

$427 95 
50 00 

$477 95 



28 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITi'. [P. D. 17 



BOSTON HOME FOR INCXTRABLSS, 2049 Dorchester At«., DorchesUr. 
(Incorporated 1884.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

E. Pierson Beebe, President; J. Grafton Minot, Secretary; 
Emor H. Harding, Treasurer; Miss L. Beatrice Merriman, 
Superintendent. 

A home for the care and treatment of women afflicted with an 
incurable disease. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 26. 

Number aided during year, 50. 



Dr. 




Cr. 






From beneficiaries 


$1,415 00 


Salaries and wages 




$10,351 79 


Subscriptions and donations 


1.392 SO 


Printing, postage, and office 




Annuities and bequests to income 


18,902 75 


supplies 




&S 68 


Income from investments . 


24,729 20 


Pro\-isions and supplies 




5,6^ 23 


Miscellaneous .... 


221 74 


Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental 


re- 


2,034 21 








Total current receipts 


$46,661 52 


pairs .... 




2,719 91 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Insurance 




139 07 


year 


72 58 


Advertiang 
Jtliscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 




218 93 
407 42 




$21,618 24 






Income invested 




2o.056 65 






Cash on hand . 




59 21 




$46,734 10 


$46,734 10 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
S52,700; value of investments, $536,248.80. 



BOSTON INDUSTRIAL HOME, 17 Davis St., Boston. (Incorporated 1877.) 
Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Rev. George Luther Cady, D.D., President; Robert W. 
Hastings, M.D., Secretary; Charles D. Bagnall, Treasurer; 
Oliver C. Elliot, Superintendent. 

To provide a home for worthy people out of employment until 
they can obtain situations. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 22. 

Number aided during year, 2,770, all partly paying. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



29 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Donations 

Income from home funds . 
Income from special funds 
Interest .... 
Sale of coal and wood 

Total current receipts 
Mortgage 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



$5,250 20 

205 80 

326 00 

1,450 45 

14 14 

36,160 60 

$43,407 19 
5,000 00 

1,609 22 



$50,016 41 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$5,117 08 


Labor paid to transients . 


1,562 00 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies 


264 59 


Provisions and supplies 


4,408 60 


For coal and wood . 


27,058 26 


Light .... 


739 33 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


782 67 


Special improvements 


3,769 49 


Stable maintenance . 


1,231 57 


Water rates and insurance 


279 65 


Advertising and telephone 


295 14 


Account special funds 


1,833 61 


Interest on loan account . 


627 22 


Miscellaneous . 


366 52 


Total current expenses . 


$48,335 73 


Cash on hand . 


1,680 68 




$50,016 41 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$52,300; amount of mortgage on same, $15,000; value of invest- 
ments, $6,136.07; special funds, $32,213.81. 



BOSTON LADIES' BETHEL SOCIETY, 8 North Bennett St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1886.) 

Report for year ending January 26, 1915. 

Mrs. Susie P. Tuckerman, President; Mrs. F. F. Gerrish, 
Secretary; Mrs. Sarah L. Jones, Treasurer; Mrs. Charles Allen, 
Superintendent. 

To assist in maintenance of worship in Baptist Bethel Church 
and provide a home for worthy seamen. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 1,134, viz., 600 paying, 70 partly 
paying, 464 free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$2,112 26 


Salaries and wages 




$642 22 


Subscriptions and donations 


32 00 


Printing, postage, and office 
pUes .... 


sup- 


6 53 






Total cuirent receipts 


$2,144 26 


Provisions and suppUes 




1,182 49 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


2 08 


Heat, Ught, and power 
Furnishings and incidental 

pairs .... 
Water rates ... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 


re- 


130 56 

53 11 

17 00 

100 18 




$2,132 09 






Cash on hand . 




14 25 




$2,146 34 


$2,146 34 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$9,000. 



30 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON LEGAL AID SOCIETY, 39 Court St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1900.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1915. 

Albert F. Bigelow, President; Richard H. Wiswall, Secretary; 
Dudley L. Pickman, Jr., Treasurer; Reginald H. Smith, Counsel. 

To provide legal aid for those who through poverty are other- 
wise unable to secure it. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 2,229, viz., 744 partly paying, 
1,485 free. 

Dr. ! Cr. 

From beneficiaries . $1,754 67 



Subscriptions and donations . 4,748 00 

Interest 13 20 

Miscellaneous . . 44 29 



Total current receipts . $6,560 16 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 158 25 



Salaries and wages . . . $3,766 34 
Printing, postage, and office sui>- 

plies 1,066 18 

Rent 592 50 

j Heat, light, and power . 16 08 

Annual report . . . 87 79 

Miscellaneous . . . 88 12 



$6,718 41 



Total current expenses . $5,617 01 

Cash on hand . . . .1,101 40 



,718 4 



BOSTON LYING-IN HOSPITAL, 24 McLean St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1832.) 

Report for j^ear ending December 31, 1914. 

William L. Richardson, President; Vvilliam D. Sohier, Secre- 
tary; James R. Hooper, Treasurer; Miss Charlotte W. Dana, 
Superintendent. 

The care of poor and deserving w^omen in childbirth. Regular 
charges for patients: residents of Boston, $30; nonresidents, $40; 
deserving needy persons, free. No charges for out-patient 
attendance. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 53. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 789, viz., 569 pay- 
ing or partly paying, 220 free; outside institution, about 2,256. 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



31 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Registration fees 
Refimd of fire loss 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$13,615 45 


Salaries and wages 


$13,946 97 


7,222 75 


Printing, postage, and office 




1,000 00 


supplies .... 


1,022 70 


15,650 19 


Provisions and supplies 


10,540 57 


685 00 


Heat, light, and power 


4,718 48 


106 00 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




238 87 


pairs 


1,688 20 




Medical supplies and instruments 


2,478 53 




$38,518 26 


Household supplies and tele- 






phone ..... 


2,200 67 


3,196 13 


Out-patient department . 
Special department at 4 McLean 


1,735 38 




St 


1,212 26 




Fire loss (refunded, contra) 


106 00 




Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


667 73 




$40,317 49 




Cash on hand .... 


1,396 90 


$41,714 39 


$41,714 39 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$168,181.64; value of investments, $352,558.31. 



BOSTON MARINE SOCIETY, Room 717, Chamber of Commerce Build- 
ing, Boston. (Incorporated 1754.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1915. 

Capt. Peter H. Crowell, President; Capt. Aberdeen H. Child, 
Secretary; Capt. Samuel Pray, Treasurer. 

To assist financially indigent members, or widows and minor 
children of deceased members. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 84. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 


$17,648 47 
13,587 32 


Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Beneficiaries 
Treasiirer's bond 
Safety deposit box 
Paid to principal fund 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 


. $1,800 00 

14,175 00 

125 00 

50 00 

. 5.066 00 

426 48 




. $21,642 48 
9,593 31 




$31,235 79 


$31,235 79 



Value of investments, $296,080. 



32 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



THE BOSTON MUSIC SCHOOL SETTLEMENT, 110 Salem St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Prof. Walter R. Spalding, President; Daniel Bloomfield, 
Associate Director; Mrs. A. Lincoln Filene, Treasurer. 

To give to children of limited means an opportunity to secure 
a good musical education under proper settlement influences. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 27. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Lessons 
Music sold 

Instruments and supplies 
People's orchestra 
Concerts . 

Summer outing fund . 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$2,151 


05 


1,406 99 


220 


43 


191 


00 


95 


10 


1,949 


37 


134 


52 


87 


37 


$6,235 


83 


2,756 


29 


$8,992 


12 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and oflace sup 

plies .... 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re^ 

pairs .... 
Music .... 
Instruments and supplies 
People's orchestra 
Concerts .... 
Summer outing fund . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$3,740 00 

157 00 
39 12 

67 85 
171 69 
219 64 

124 85 
1,908 36 

125 10 
533 71 

$7,087 32 
1,904 80 

$8,992 12 



Value of investments, $1,678.58. 



BOSTON NEWSBOYS' 



CLUB, 277 Tremont St., Boston. 
1909.) 



(Incorporated 



Report for year ending June 30, 1915. 

Nathan L. Amster, President; Alexander I. Peckham, Secre- 
tary; James J. Storrow, Treasurer; Edward R. Curran, Superin- 
tendent. 

To befriend in every possible way the newsboys and other boys 
of the city of Boston, without distinction as to race, color, or 
creed. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 617. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $6,075 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 260 99 



$6,335 99 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$3,821 60 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies . . . . . 


56 69 


Heat and light . . . . 


668 39 


Incidental repairs 


66 35 


Camps . . . . . 


685 45 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


543 52 


Total current expenses 


$5,842 00 


Cash on hand .... 


493 99 




$6,335 99 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



33 



BOSTON NORTH END MISSION, 712 Ford Building, Boston. Home, 
corner Bourne St. and Southbourne Rd., Roslindale. (Incorporated 
1870.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914, 

Charles W. Kidder, President; Albert D. Auryansen, Secre- 
tary; William H. Bain, Treasurer; Rev. C. L. D. Younkin, 
Financial Secretary; Harriet M. Hanson, Children's Secretary. 

Temporary home for care and training of destitute children; 
placing out; supervising; also some received under guardianship 
and custody for adoption or indenture. Religious but non- 
sectarian. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Total number cared for during year, 104, including 23 in 
Mount Hope Home. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Borrowed on treasurer's notes . 
Reimbursed account matron's 

last illness .... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$5,214 05 

3,866 55 

2,225 75 

110 75 

$11,417 10 
4,000 00 

277 00 

236 92 



$15,931 02 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$5,372 15 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


207 91 


Provisions and supplies 


3,559 58 


Rent 


251 92 


Heat, light, and power 


544 82 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs 


469 64 


Board and clothes of children in 




outside homes 


1,188 94 


Miscellaneous .... 


442 71 


Total current expenses . 


$12,037 67 


Payment of loans 


3,000 00 


Advanced, account matron's last 




illness 


277 00 


Taxes, repairs and water rates on 




real estate not used for cor- 




porate purposes . 


344 79 


Cash on hand . . . ^ 


271 56 




$15,931 02 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$16,000; value of investments, $42,674.60. 



BOSTON NURSERY FOR BLIND BABIES, l47 South Huntington Ave., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending October 11, 1915. 

Horace G. Allen, President; Miss Bessie J. Daniel, Secretary; 
Mrs. 'Marguerite S. Hopkins, Treasurer; Miss Jane A. Russell, 
Superintendent. 

Care and treatment of blind children under five years of age. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Number aided during year, 35, viz., 15 partly paying, 20 free. 



34 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$6,008 03 


Salaries and wages . 




$3,545 11 


Subscriptions and donations 


1.749 


84 


Printing, postage, and 


office 




Annuities and bequests to income 


5,000 


00 


supplies 




224 25 


Income from investments . 


4.714 


S5 


I*ro-vision3 and supplies 




2,106 11 


Bonds matured 


4,000 


00 


Heat, light, and power 




696 07 








Furnishings and incidental re- 












Total current receipts . 


$21,472 


72 


pairs . 




366 30 


Cash on hand at beginning of 






Telephone 




33 74 


year 


3.794 


55 


Water 
Advertising 
Taxes . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 




99 00 
155 40 

50 40 
131 15 




$7,407 53 








Income invested 




16,671 01 








Cash on hand . 




1,1SS 73 




$25,267 


27 


$25,267 27 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$36,400; value of investments, 876,000. 



BOSTON PILOTS' RELIEF SOCIETY, 41 Lewis Wharf, Boston. Incor- 
porated 1886. 

Report for year ending Januan.- 12, 191-5. 

James H. Reid, President; Charles E. Stearns, Secretary; 
Joseph W. Colby, Treasurer. 

To aid needy pilots holding licenses for the port of Boston, 
their widows, and minor children. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during vear, 23. 



Dr. 

Annuities and bequests to income $60<3 00 

Income from investment* . . 10, SSI 06 

Members' dues ... S4 00 

On account of mortgage . 500 28 

Total current receipts . . $12,065 34 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2.S57 95 



Cr. . 
Salaries and wages . 
I*rinting, postage, and office 
supplies .... 

To widows, orphans, and pilots . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand .... 



$14,923 29 



$300 00 

63 00 
5,730 00 

$6,093 00 
6,921 56 
1,90S 73 

$14,923 29 



Value of investments held by trustees for benefit of society, 
$178,330.62. 



BOSTON PORT AND SEAMEN'S AID SOCIETY, MANAGERS OF, 11 North 
Sq., Boston, vincorporated 1829 and 1867. 

Report for year ending January- 22, 1915. 

Rev. George A. Gordon, D.D., Preside?it; John A. Bennett, 
Secretary; Lewis R. Tucker, Treasurer; Capt. Joseph P. Hatch, 

Superintendent. 



Part III 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



35 



Improving the moral, religious, and general condition of sea- 
men and their families in Boston and its vicinity. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number aided during year, 12,689, viz., 9,953 paying, 66 
partly paying, 2,670 free; number of families aided, 7. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$11,183 41 


Salaries and wages . . . 


$7,824 72 


Subscriptions and donations 


5 00 


Printing, postage, and oflBcc 




Annuities and bequests to income 


1,800 00 


supplies 


975 31 


Income from investments . 


17,357 27 


Provisions and supplies 


7,695 25 






Telephone 


120 16 






Total current receipts . 


$30,345 68 


Heat, light, and power 


1,389 93 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Furnishings and incidental re 




year 


5,504 17 


pairs .... 


1,033 85 






Charity .... 


2,700 08 






Reading room . 


1,848 10 






Entertainments and Sundaj 








services 


646 91 






Taxes and insurance 


486 49 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


336 53 




$25,057 33 






Income invested 


5,915 50 






Cash on hand . 


4,877 02 




$35,849 85 


$35,849 85 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$39,500; value of investments, $367,047. 



BOSTON PROVIDENT ASSOCIATION, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1854.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Russell G. Fessenden, President; William Hedge, Secretary; 
P. T. Jackson, Treasurer; William H. Pear, General Agent. 

The relief of needy families, the suppression of street beggary, 
and the improvement of the condition of the poor. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, 7,084; number of families aided, 
.1,360. 



Dr. 




Cr. 




From beneficiaries and their 
friends .... 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 


$366 70 
16,045 52 

1,000 00 
25,328 39 


Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and ofl&ce 

supplies 
Provisions, supplies, and cash 
Rent .... 
Heat, light, and power 
Travel and telephone 
Confidential exchange 
Public accountant . 
League for preventive work 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 


$11,399 45 

318 49 
33,156 70 
230 00 
443 25 
392 42 
250 00 
61 00 
100 00 
187 74 


Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 


$42,740 61 
3,721 13 

137 85 




. $46,539 05 
60 54 




$46,599 59 


$46,599 59 



Value of investments, $523,960. 



36 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON SEAMAN'S FRIEND SOCIETY, 287 Hanover St., Boston, and 
Vineyard Haven. (Incorporated 1829.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1915. 

Rev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D., President; Charles F. 
Stratton, Secretary and Treasurer; Rev. James McD. Blue, 
Chaplain at Boston, and Madison Edwards, Chaplain at Vineyard 
Haven. 

Ministering to the spiritual, social, moral, and temporal wants 
and needs of seamen. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number aided during year, 466. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts . 

Cash on hand at beginning 

year .... 



of 



$11 25 

5,538 15 

5,282 93 

7,571 23 

3 00 

$18,406 56 

850 37 



$19,256 93 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $6,687 63 
Printing, postage, advertising, 

and office supplies . . 689 76 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,409 91 

Rent 149 94 

Heat, light, and power . . 1,145 88 

Incidental repairs . . . 127 80 
Expense of publishing " Sea 

Breeze" . . . . 467 78 

Expense at Vineyard Haven . 3,330 70 

Expense at Tarpaulin Cove . 150 00 

Aid to destitute seamen . . 657 87 

Maintenance of launch at Boston 454 38 

Interest on notes payable . . 403 20 

Miscellaneous .... 1,349 31 

Total current expenses . . $17,024 16 

Cash on hand .... 2,232 77 

$19,256 93 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$32,150; value of investments, $103,016. 



BOSTON SOCIETY FOR THE CARE OF GIRLS, 184 Boylston St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1803.) 

Report for year ending October 25, 1915. 

Miss Abby M. Storer, President; Mrs. Arthur H. Nichols, 
Secretary; Miss Sarah C. Paine, Treasurer; Miss Mabelle B. 
Blake, General Secretary. 

Care and supervision of girls, irrespective of age, race, or color. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 245; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in full, 
48; in part, 144; not reimbursed, 53. Monthly average number 
of children under supervision in foster homes, 202. Number of 
placing-out visitors, 5. 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



37 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
National bank tax rebate . 
Miscellaneous . 



$3,073 83 

51 00 

23,608 87 

1,136 83 

25 13 

$27,895 66 



Xotal current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,492 22 

Bonds paid .... 12,102 77 



$42,490 65 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$9,569 13 


Printing, postage, and office 




suppUes 


282 93 


Provisions and supplies 


3,976 94 


Rent .... 


1,164 00 


Heat, light, power, and telephone 


455 76 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


81 15 


Board of children 


9,571 14 


National conference . 


92 94 


Traveling expenses . 


1,452 04 


Doctors' and medical expenses 


1,200 28 


Contributions 


150 00 


Sewer assessment 


454 88 


Miscellaneous . 


1,071 27 


Total current expenses . 


$29,522 46 


Income invested 


10,509 75 


Cash on hand . 


2,458 44 




$42,490 65 



Value of investments, $531,713.03. 



BOSTON SOCIETY OF DECORATIVE ART, 555 Boylston St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1882.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Miss Frances C. Sturgis, President; Miss Ellen BuUard, 
Secretary; Boylston A. Beal, Treasurer; Miss Marion M. Shaw, 
Superintendent. 

To raise the standard of art needlework, and provide for the 
sale of contributors' handiwork. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 100. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Sale of articles 
Sale of bonds .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$5 00 
1,298 46 
5,416 60 
2,885 83 


$9,605 89 
833 74 


$10,439 63 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 

Rent 

Materials 

Expenses 

Workers . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$4,809 26 

1,875 00 

1,180 53 

407 25 

1,553 69 

$9,825 73 
613 90 

$10,439 63 



Value of investments, $21,065. 



THE BOSTON TRAVELER CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 171 Tremont >St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Robert L. O'Brien, President; Frank H. Wallis, Secretary; 
James H. Higgins, Treasurer; John S. Pfeil, Manager, 

Providing rest and recreation for indigent people, and par- 
ticularly mothers and young children, by establishing them in 



38 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY 



[P. D. 1 



/. 



temporary or permanent homes; and in general helping to im- 
prove the condition of the poor of Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 6,533. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $6,187 64 

Loans to income . . . 194 07 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 147 71 



$6,529 42 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . $1,070 00 
Printing, postage, and oflBce suj>- 

plies 366 45 

Pro%-isions and supplies . . 3,591 77 

Rent 400 00 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 549 13 

Cottage 35 00 

Storage ..... 50 50 

Signs 18 50 

Medical supplies . . . 11 62 

Car fares ..... 362 10 

Insurance . . . . 27 00 

Telephones , . . . 47 35 

$6,529 42 



BOSTON UNITED MOATH CHITIM ASSOCIATION, 395 Blue Hill Ave., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending Januarj' 1, 1915. 

Levy Herman, President; Morris L. Morrison, Secretary; 
Bernard Aaronson, Treasurer. 

To assist the Jewish poor of Boston and vicinity in the proper 
observance of the Passover. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number of families aided during year, 709. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations . $3,321 37 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 313 24 



$3,634 61 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $106 OO 
I*rinting, postage, and office sup- 
plies ..... 91 75 
Pro%'isions and supplies . . 1,364 93 
Cash to poor .... 1,992 78 
Express and teaming . . . 73 03 

Total current expenses . . $3,628 49 

Cash on hand . . . . 6 12 

$3,634 61 



BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 316 Huntington 

Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1852 and 1887.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1915. 

Arthur S. Johnson, President; F. P. Luce, Secretary pro tern.; 
Lewis A. Crossett, Treasurer; George W. Mehaffey, General 
Secretary. 

The improvement of the spiritual, intellectual, social, and 
physical condition of the young men and boys of Boston, and to 
provide dormitories with homelike surroundings. 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



39 



Number of paid officers, employees, and teachers, 314. 
Number aided during year, 12,018, viz., 11,298 paying, 720 
free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Bequests .... 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$282,263 46 

18,246 00 

8,510 00 

1,353 83 


$310,373 29 
14,600 00 
15,250 00 

50 86 


$340,274 15 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 
supplies 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Bequests invested . 
New building account 
Cash on hand 



$180,284 51 

21,682 08 
13,106 60 

10,582 49 
84,749 94 

$310,805 62 

15,250 00 

14,600 00 

18 53 

$340,274 15 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$1,224,000; amount of mortgage on same, $200,000; value of 
investments, $218,000. 



BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN UNION, 48 Boylston St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1852.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Frank L. Locke, President; Charles L. Burrill, Secretary; 
Edward A. Church, Treasurer. 

Recreation and instruction by means of evening classes, 
religious services, lectures and entertainment. Maintains an em- 
ployment bureau, gymnasium, and committees to visit sick and 
distribute clothing; also a committee on country week and rides 
for invalids. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 51. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 4,894, all partly 
paying; outside institution, 3,653, all free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$21,140 76 


Salaries and wages . 


. $28,832 82 


Subscriptions and donations 


5,913 50 


Printing and stationery 


3,815 16 


Income from investments . 


23,977 06 


Heat and light 


5,157 36 


Donations for country week, 




General administration 


. 15,668 89 


rides for invalids, and Christ- 




Special charities 


. 21,161 56 


mas festival .... 


16,249 86 






Income from investments, special 








charities .... 


2,868 91 






Total current receipts . 


$70,150 09 




Deficit taken from surplus of 








previous year 


4,485 70 








$74,635 79 


$74,635 79 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$750,000; value of investments held by trustees for benefit of 
society, $563,600. 



40 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 40 Berkeley St. 
and 68 Warrenton St., Boston. (Incorporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1915. 

Mrs. Benjamin F. Tenney, President; Miss Abbie W. Covel, 
Secretary; Miss Eleanor H. Jones, Treasurer; Miss Antoinette 
Field, Superintendent of 40 Berkeley St. ; Miss Josephine Quimby, 
Superintendent of 68 Warrenton St. 

To promote the temporal, moral, and religious welfare of 
young women who are dependent upon their own exertions for 
support. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 127. 

Number aided during year: in boarding homes, 5,387; placed 
through employment bureau, 4,457. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From schools and boarding 




Salaries and wages . 




$50,292 38 


homes .... 


$121,625 11 


Printing, postage, and 


office 




Subscriptions and donations 


4,624 00 


supplies 




1,722 76 


Annuities and bequests to in- 




Provisions and supplies . 




48,108 86 


come 


1,900 00 


Heat, light, power, and 


tele- 




Income from investments 


5.363 29 


phone 


, 


11,150 29 


Miscellaneous 


442 74 


Rent .... 




468 10 






Furnishings and incidental re- 










Total current receipts . 


$133,955 14 


pairs .... 


. 


10,433 59 


Loans to income 


6,158 79 


Travelers' aid work 


. 


1,271 76 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




National Board 


. 


800 00 


year 


2,801 02 


Insurance 
Interest 
Auditing 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 


• 


1,865 69 

1,975 00 

807 80 

10,750 90 




$139,655 13 






Cash on hand 




3,259 82 




$142,914 95 


$142,914 95 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$232,600; amount of mortgage on same, $40,000; value of in- 
vestments, $162,003.84. 



BRITISH CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 5 Park Sq., Boston. (Incorporated 

1817.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Albert F. Flint, President; Thomas T. Stokes, Executive 
Secretary; Frederick J. Stark, Treasurer. 

Temporary relief of those born under the British flag, their 
immediate descendants, and families. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 996. 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



41 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$20 00 


Salaries and wages 


. $252 00 


Income from investments . 


633 85 


Printing .... 


47 50 


Wheeler fund . 


40 00 


General expense 


177 60 


Dues .... 


460 00 


Rent .... 


190 00 


Miscellaneous . 


71 94 


Charity ball committee 


10 00 






Burial account . 

Relief .... 


5 00 
860 00 


Total current receipts 


$1,225 79 


Cash on hand at beginning of yeai 


1,829 67 












Total current expenses . 


. $1,542 10 






Permanent fund 


326 25 






Wheeler fund . 


55 00 






Cash on hand . 


. 1,132 11 




$3,055 46 


$3,055 46 



Value of investments, $18,599.48. 

BROOKE HOUSE, 79 Chandler St., Boston. (Incorporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Jacob C. Rogers, President; Miss Marianne Paine, 
Secretary; Walter Hunnewell, Treasurer; Miss Sarah E. Gardner, 
Superintendent. 

A home for working girls at moderate cost. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 181; outside 
institution, 130. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 


$14,106 63 

1,508 00 

980 51 


Ct. 

Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental 

pairs .... 
Laundry 
Water rates . 
Interest on mortgage 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 


. $5,988 47 
7,606 24 
1,582 68 


Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 


$16,595 14 
3,029 52 


. 1,175 72 
230 84 
166 50 
450 00 
113 65 




. $17,314 10 
2,310 56 




$19,624 66 


$19,624 66 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$68,000; amount of mortgage on same, $10,000; value of invest- 
ments, $30,000. 



THE BUNKER HILL BOYS' CLUB ASSOCIATION, 10 Wood St., Charles- 
town. (Incorporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1915. 

James H. Whitman, President; Frank S. Mason, Secretary; 
George F. Tufts, Treasurer. 

To take Charlestown boys off the streets at night and give 



42 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



them manual and physical training. Ages, eight to sixteen, 
distinction as to race, creed, or condition of life. 

Number of paid officers and employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, about 1,000. 



No 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
From service performed 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$88 82 

7,022 50 

500 00 

120 00 


$7,731 
197 
139 


32 
11 
16 


$8,067 59 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup 

plies .... 
Real estate expense . 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re^ 

pairs .... 
Summer trips and playground 
Classes, instruction, and supplies 
Library and entertainments 
Previous bills 
Miscellaneous . 

Total Current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$3,706 94 



935 


31 


74 


90 


358 


17 


446 


12 


390 08 


897 


18 


182 65 


140 


11 


181 


07 


$7,312 


53 


755 06 


$8,067 59 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$8,000. 



BURNAP FREE HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 38 Pleasant St., Dorchester. 
(Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1915. 

J. Converse Gray, President; Miss Mary A. Fitch, Secretary; 
George G. Quincy, Treasurer; Miss Ida G. Angell, Matron. 
Free home for women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5 to 8. 
Number aided during year, 20. 



Dr, 



Cr. 



Cash on hand .... 


$2,595 40 


Salaries and wages . 




$2,305 41 


Subscriptions and donations 


2,904 06 


Printing, postage, and office 




Annuities and bequests to income 


2,711 75 


supplies 




192 40 


Income from investments . 


2,208 16 


Provisions and supplies 




1,688 93 






Heat, light, power, telephone, 








and water 




550 97 






Furnishings and incidental 


re- 








pairs .... 




134 67 






Burial of one inmate 

Total current expenses . 




75 50 




$4,947 88 






Income invested 




2,989 17 






Cash on hand . 




2,482 02 




$10,419 37 


$10,419 37 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$22,300; value of investments, $47,989.17. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



43 



CAPE COD ASSOCIATION, 179 Summer St., Boston. (Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1915. 

AYillard T. Sears, President; C. F. Crowell, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

Helping Cape Cod young men through college by means of 
loans. 

Number aided during year, 3. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . SI, 414 So 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 542 97 



Sl,957 82 

Value of investments, $20,770. 



Cr. 



Paid beneficiaries 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$630 00 
15 00 

S645 00 
1,312 82 

$1,957 82 



CARNEY HOSPITAL, Old Harbor St., South Boston. (Incorporated 1865.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Sister Raphael Jones, President and Treasurer; Sister M. 
Bernard Nunan, Secretary. 

Care of the sick, irrespective of creed, color, or nationality. 
(Contagious diseases excepted.) 

Number of paid employees, 192 (including 92 pupil nurses). 

Number aided during year in institution, 3,874; number of 
free patients, 1,640; number of hospital days during year, 
45,574; number of free days, 7,600; number of visits in out- 
patient department, 52,761. 



Dr. 
Patients' pajTnents . 
Payments by city, town or State 
Voluntary contributions 
Interest, di-vidends, and rentals, 
Unrestricted legacies 

Total ciu-rent receipts . 
Loan .... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



$74,748 33 | Professional care of patients 

1,564 25 I Department expenses, wages 

13,298 00 ' General house and property ex- 

532 91 penses . . . . 



1,163 57 



S91,307 06 
4,000 00 



384 68 



)5,691 74 



Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$12,200 35 
13,658 50 



68,346 


97 


608 


21 


$94,814 03 


877 


71 



$95,691 74 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$265,200; amount of mortgage on same, $53,500; value of in- 
vestments, S5,177. 



44 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



CHANNING HOME, corner Francis St. and Pilgrim Rd., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1858 and 1861.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Samuel A. Green, M.D., President; Algernon Coolidge, M.D., 
Secretary; James P. Parmenter, Treasurer; Mary E. P. Fennell, 
Superintendent. 

The care of sick, destitute women, especially those in ad- 
vanced stages of tuberculosis. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 70; outside institu- 
tion, 14; all free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,839 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,800 00 

Income from investments . . 6,720 46 



Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginnng of 

year ..... 



$9,520 46 
882 72 



1,839 00 



$12,242 18 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $4,074 83 
Printing, postage, and office 

supplies . . . . 70 51 
Provisions and supplies . . 4,898 29 
Heat, light, and power . . 1,221 21 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 1,740 46 

Telephone . . . . 96 40 

Insurance . . . . 52 60 

Miscellaneous . . . . 87 98 

$12,242 18 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$35,000; value of investments, $128,216.09. 



CHARITABLE BURIAL ASSOCIATION, 104 Salem St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1894.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Abraham Moss, President; J. H. Stone, Secretary; Mark Lewis, 
Treasurer. 
To furnish free burial for the needy. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number buried, 16. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 



$514 68 



$514 68 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. $83 75 


Undertakers' services . 


. 249 00 


Hearses and carriages . 


85 00 


Collection fees . 


15 92 


Head boards and grave fixing 


17 00 


Deficit paid 


45 07 


Total current expenses 


. $495 74 


Cash on hand 


18 94 



$514 68 



Part IL 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



45 



CHARITABLE IRISH SOCIETY, Boston. (Incorporated 1809.) 

Report for year ending March 17, 1915. 

John A. Kiggen, President; John J. Keenan, P. O. Box 45, 
Back Bay Station, Boston, Secretary; Thomas F. F. Taff, 
Treasurer. 

To cultivate a spirit of unity and harmony among all resident 
Irishmen and their descendants; to alleviate suffering, and to aid 
such of its members as may be deserving of its charity. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 104; number of families aided, 6. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Interest .... 



$6,255 00 
426 40 



Total current receipts . $6,681 40 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 11,627 13 



$18,308 53 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and oflBce 

supplies .... 

Rent 

Relief, passage tickets, etc. 
Refiinded (one hundred and 

seventy-seventh anniversary 

banquet tickets paid for but 

not supplied) 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand, 



$1,019 36 

874 49 
405 36 
318 37 



55 00 
3,130 99 

$5,803 57 
12,504 96 

$18,308 53 



CHARITABLE SURGICAL APPLIANCE SHOP, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Robert W. Emmons, 2d, President and Treasurer; Augustus 
Thorndike, M.D., Secretary; Theodore H. Bartol, Foreman. 

To supply hospitals, doctors, and others with surgical ap- 
pliances at cost. 

Number of paid employees, 9. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $633 37 

From institutions and individuals 

for apparatus . . 11,367 55 



Total current receipts . $12,000 92 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 3,284 55 



$15,285 47 



Cr. 

Wages $6,858 77 

Supplies and materials . . 3,642 17 

Tools and machinery . . 982 53 

Donation to Children's Hospital 100 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 949 83 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$12,533 30 

747 50 

2,004 67 



$15,285 47 



Value of investments, $12,442.50. 



46 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



CHARLESTOWN POOR'S FUND, TRUSTEES OF, 233 Main St., Charles- 
town. (Incorporated 1825.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1915. 

B. Frank Hatch, President; Gardner Bates, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 
To provide coal and medicine for the poor. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number of families aided, 209. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $1,434 34 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 644 88 



$2,079 22 



Salaries and wages 


. $150 00 


Provisions and supplies 


. 1,142 35 


Rent .... 


2 00 


Treasurer's bond 


37 50 


Safety deposit box 


10 00 


Miscellaneous . 


2 00 


Total current expenses 


. $1,343 85 


Cash on hand , 


735 37 




$2,079 22 



Value of investments, $34,131.77. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1869.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Francis W. Hunnewell, President; George von L. Meyer, Jr., 
Secretary; Gordon Abbott, Treasurer; Sister Caroline, Superin- 
tendent. 

Medical and surgical treatment of children under twelve years 
of age, residents of Boston, and, in special cases, nonresidents. 
Training school for nurses. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 62. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 2,585, viz., 835 
paying, 497 partly paying, 1,253 free; outside institution, 10,622, 
viz., 7,000 partly paying, 3,622 free. 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



47 



From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to in 

come .... 
Income from investments 
Surgical appliances 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 



$20,323 54 
27,521 45 

2,800 00 

39,692 11 

8,420 78 

963 65 

$99,721 53 
20.154 24 



$119,875 77 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$38,955 03 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


2,667 22 


Provisions and supplies . 


30,770 51 


Rent 


1,225 33 


Heat, light, and power . 


11,364 84 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


3,749 95 


Drugs and medicines 


4,203 71 


Surgical appliances 


8,125 17 


Annuities .... 


1,083 33 


Interest on loans 


3,346 41 


Gift, annual report, water. 




X-ray, telephone, school of 




nursing, laundry, and pathol- 




ogy 


11,080 63 


Hospital petty cash, social serv- 




ice, and sundries 


3,303 64 




$119,875 77 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$838,380.11; value of investments, $985,687.79. 



THE CHILDREN'S MISSION TO CHILDREN, 279 Tremont St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1864.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Henry M. Williams, President; Rev. Christopher R. Eliot, 
Clerk; Allston Burr, Treasurer; Parker B. Field, General Secre- 
tary. 

To help needy children by advising and guiding them at home, 
by securing adequate assistance along special lines, by placing 
them for shorter or longer periods in private families, carefully 
selected and supervised. Few children are given for adoption. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 311; the 
society reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: 
in full, 56; in part, 110; not reimbursed, 145; through advice or 
supervision, 593. Monthly average number of children under su- 
pervision in foster homes, 189. Number of placing-out visitors, 5. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$11,276 04 


Salaries and wages 






$13,105 36 


Subscriptions and donations 


7,464 45 


Printing, postage, 


and 


office 




Annuities and bequests to income 


3,088 00 


supplies 






1,677 65 


Income from investments . 


21,525 83 


Board . 






18,763 12 






Furnishings and incidental re- 








pairs . 






1,129 90 






OflBce expenses 






979 50 






Travel . 






1.489 84 






Medical services 






930 26 






Clothing 

Total current expenses 




4,306 54 




$42,382 17 






Cash on hand . 


• 




972 15 




$43,354 32 


$43,354 32 



48 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$145,400; value of investments, $451,900.50. 



CHURCH HOME FOR ORPHAN AND DESTITUTE CHILDREN, 296 Boyl- 
ston St., Boston. (Incorporated 1858.) 

Report for year ending October 15, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, D.D., President; Rev. Reginald 
H. Howe, Secretary; Mr. Charles E. Mason, Treasurer; Miss 
Katherine P. Hewins, General Secretary. 

Provides care for children of Protestant Episcopal parentage 
in foster homes of the same faith. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes (boarded), 134; 
the society reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of super- 
vision: in full, 14; in part, 63; not reimbursed, 57. Monthly 
average number of children under supervision in (boarded, free, 
and wage) homes, 82j. Number of placing-out visitors, 3. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
On account of beneficiaries 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$3,702 76 

11,239 84 

3,941 69 

125 43 


$19,009 72 
4,239 03 

304 69 


$23,553 44 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$6,402 67 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


690 00 


Rent 


614 72 


Telephone .... 


224 58 


Equipment and repairs . » . 


293 30 


Board and expenses of children . 


12,758 51 


For Easter flowers . . 


24 39 


For industrial education . 


291 29 


Miscellaneous .... 


534 02 



Total current expenses . 
Restricted income unexpended 
Cash on hand . 



$21,833 48 

241 66 

1,478 30 

$23,553 44 



Value of investments, $243,694.72. 



CITY MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



14 Beacon St., Boston. 
1820.) 



(Incorporated 



Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Jacob P. Bates, President; Rev. Daniel W. Waldron, Secretary; 
Samuel F. Wilkins, Treasurer. 

The religious and moral instruction of the poor in the city of 
Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 27. 

Number of families aided during year, 2,165. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



49 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $33,874 41 

Annuities and bequests to income 1,401 60 

Income from investments . . 5,056 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 17 51 



Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$40,349 52 
5,905 34 

633 79 



$46,888 65 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$17,275 00 


Printing, postage, oflBce supplies, 




and collection expenses . 




1,281 86 


Rent .... 




529 98 


Literature distributed 




262 00 


Easter mission and work 


for 




Chinese 


, 


652 62 


Relief of poor . 




6,524 75 


Recreation work 




13,414 23 


Thanksgiving and Christmas 




charities 




5,486 91 


Interest .... 




148 13 


Forest Hills cemetery 




320 00 


Miscellaneous . 


• 


955 29 


Total current expenses . 


$46,850 77 


Cash on hand . 


• 


37 88 




$46,888 65 



Value of investments, $104,191. 



COLUMBUS DAY NURSERY OF SOUTH BOSTON, 376 Fourth St., South 
Boston. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1915. 

David W. Creed, President; John M. Costello, Secretary; 
Peter W. Walsh, Treasurer; Sister Elizabeth, Matron. 
Day care of the children of needy working women. 
Number of paid employees, 4. 



Dr. 
Cash on hand . 
Subscriptions and donations 



$169 89 
1,653 20 



$1,823 09 



cv. 

Salaries and wages 


$853 00 


Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 




pUes ..... 


5 25 


Provisions and supplies 


380 24 


Taxes, interest, and insurance 


75 40 


Heat, light, and power 


278 56 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


40 63 


Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses 


33 94 


$1,667 02 


Cash on hand .... 


156 07 


$1,823 09 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
S6,500; amount of mortgage on same, $1,000. 



CONFERENCE OF BAPTIST MINISTERS IN MASSACHUSETTS, 525 
Trempnt Temple, Boston. (Incorporated 1862.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Rev. H. C. Leach, President; Rev. Henry E. Hodge, Secretary; 
Rev. Joseph E. Perry, Treasurer. 



50 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



The promotion of the union and usefulness of its members, and 
the relief of aged and disabled Baptist ministers who are indigent. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number aided during year, 47. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations . S862 88 
Income from investments . . 11,783 87 
Annuity fund .... 384 61 
Special contribution to perma- 
nent funds . . . . 76 50 
From securities sold and interest 

on same .... 28,858 62 

D. S. Ford estate . . . 1,300 00 

Total current receipts . . $43,266 48 

Bonds received for annuity fund 5,000 00 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 3,014 52 



$51,281 00 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. 


S391 58 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


118 48 


Rent 






25 00 


Moving safe 






4 30 


To brethren 






11,711 25 


Interest . 






374 00 


Fees 






40 88 


Box in vault 






40 00 


Treasvu-er's bond 




50 00 


Expenses of board meetings and 




directors .... 


104 S3 


National benefit fund 


261 08 


Massachusetts Baptist Char- 




itable Society 


34 25 


Total current expenses . 


$13,155 65 


Income invested 


29,948 54 


Bonds transferred to permanent 




fund 


5,000 00 


Cash on hand .... 


3,176 81 




$51,281 00 



Value of investments, $268,957.41. 



CONSUMPTIVES' HOME, TRUSTEES OF THE, 560 Blue Hill Ave., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1871.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Hon. John L. Bates, President; Mrs. Marie C. Mallory, Secre- 
tary; Edward D. Mallory, Treasurer; Mrs. C. M. Torrey, 
Matron. 

A Protestant home for the care of needy consumptives in the 
last stages of the disease. No admission fees. Boston patients 
preferred. Open to all without regard to age, sex, color, nation- 
ality, or creed. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 20. 

Number aided during year, 72, viz., 2 partly paying, 70 free. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



51 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$39 00 


Salaries and wages . 


$5,340 98 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,664 26 


Printing, postage, and office 




Bequests to income . 


1,000 00 


suppUes .... 


86 76 


Income from investments . 


. 1,045 00 


Provisions and supplies 


2,919 83 


Tiadies' auxiliary 


691 99 


Water and fire protection . 


1,028 20 


Rebate on water bill 


40 14 


Light 


199 04 


Nl 




Furnishings and incidental re- 








Total current receipts . 


. $4,480 39 


pairs ..... 


643 94 


Loans to income 


5,730 07 


Reports, insurance, and loan 




Cash on hand at beginning of 


paid ..... 


641 44 


year .... 


1,048 39 


Telephone and funeral expenses . 


130 03 






Garden and vault 


90 00 






Hay and grain .... 


81 58 






Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


64 85 




$11,226 65 






Cash on hand .... 


32 20 




$11,258 85 


$11,258 85 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$133,427.50; value of investments, $21,351.53. 



CO-OPERATIVE WORKROOMS, INC., 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1877.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1915. 

Mrs. Roger Wolcott, President; Mrs. Neal Rantoul, Secretary; 
Orrin G. Wood, Treasurer; Miss Sarah R. Berry, Agent. 
To aid poor women by giving out and teaching sewing. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 
Number aided during year, 403. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From sales .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$5,806 50 

157 51 

6,198 73 


$12,162 74 
539 31 


$12,702 05 



Cr. 
Employees iand sewing women . $6,250 63 
Heat, light, and power . . 120 08 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 3 85 
Materials bought . , . 5,266 19 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$11,640 75 
900 00 
161 30 

$12,702 05 



Value of investments, $3,798.75. 



DAHLGREN MEMORIAL HALL ASSOCIATION, 409 Broadway, South 
Boston. (Incorporated 1886.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

J. Payson Bradley, President; Francis Z. Jenks, Secretary; 
Frank Wilkinson, Treasurer. 

To assist indigent soldiers and sailors of the war of the re- 
bellion and their widows and orphan children. 



52 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17 



Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number aided during year, 31. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $741 27 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 3,669 21 



$4,410 48 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 

pUes .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 

Heat, light, and power 
ReUef fund 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . . . , 



$98 00 

39 25 
100 00 
305 00 

20 32 
100 00 

$662 57 
3,747 91 

$4,410 48 



Value of investments, $9,400. 



DALY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, 111 Train St., Dorchester. (Incorporated 

1899.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1915. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Rev. James J. 
O'Brien, Secretary; Rt. Rev. Mgr. J. P. O'Connell, Treasurer; 
Sister M. Teresa, Superintendent. 

Industrial school for poor girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, 79, viz., 29 partly paying, 50 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous (work) 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$2,004 30 
4,506 60 
1,505 46 
2,944 48 

$10,960 84 

6,419 73 



$17,380 57 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $1,901 25 

Printing, postage, and oflBce 

supplies . . . . 116 90 

Provisions and supplies . , 5,627 36 

Heat, light, and power . . 1,834 58 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 3,673 96 

Total current expenses . . $13,154 05 

Cash on hand .... 4,226 52 

' $17,380 57 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$75,000; value of investments, $28,300. 



DEACONESS' AID SOCIETY OF NEW ENGLAND, 36 Bromfield St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending January 6, 1915. 

Mrs. Frances J. Douglass, President; Mrs. Nellie Lacount 
Rich, Secretary; Mrs. George N. Law, Treasurer. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



53 



To help the various institutions that are under the control of 
the Deaconess Association, and to help in the general uplifting 
of humanity. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments 
Mite boxes 
Life members . 
Membership dues 
Sale .... 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$87 85 


Salaries and wages 


S585 00 


500 00 


Printing, postage, and office sup 




66 57 


plies .... 


103 22 


218 76 


Supplies .... 


18 35 


55 00 


Rent .... 


8 00 


228 00 


Heat, light, and power 


7 04 


124 13 


Training school fund . 


750 00 




Scholarship 


120 00 




$1,280 31 


Guests in hospital 


241 00 


1,600 88 


Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 


33 61 




$1,866 22 




Cash on hand . 


1,014 97 


$2,881 J9 


$2,881 19 



DENISON HOUSE, 89-97 Tyler St., Boston. (Incorporated 1913.) 

Report for year ending October 15, 1915. 

Caroline L. Humphrey, President; Mary H. Dana, Secretary; 
D. Blakely Hoar, Treasurer; Geraldine Gordon, Head Worker. 

College and educational work through clubs and classes, and 
neighborhood co-operation for better conditions. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 18. 



Dr. 

Donations 

Income from gymnasium fund 

Club and house dues 

Stamp saving department 

Printing, postage, etc. 

Board from housekeeper 

Telephone tolls 

Santa Lucia Club 

College Settlement Association 

Opera House performance 

Interest on deposits . 

Fire insurance balance 



Total current receipts . 

Cash on hand at beginning 

year .... 



of 



$10,219 42 

208 99 

71 68 

39 00 

29 58 

3,833 75 

22 11 
6 17 

1,200 00 

1.082 26 

39 95 

23 03 


$16,775 94 
1,382 41 


$18,158 35 



Cr. 

Salaries . 

Repairs . 

Light and fuel . 

Water 

Reducing principal of mortgages 

Interest on mortgage notes 

Telephone 

Christmas expenses . 

Summer work . 

Refund of club dues 

Recreation . 

Office expenses, clerical work 

Boys' work 

Italian department . 

Class work 

Neighborhood hygiene 

Expenses of 1913-1914 

House expenses 

Housekeeping flat 

ReUef 

Insurance 

Teresa Caliric fund 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$6,389 93 

558 36 

733 47 

53 80 

200 00 

607 61 

259 06 

110 51 

501 01 

3 83 

180 12 

1,346 34 

99 73 

970 65 

124 98 

312 25 

208 00 

3,945 19 

170 66 

841 08 

84 98 

52 00 

78 39 

$17,831 95 
326 40 

$18,158 35 



Value of investments, $15,835. 



54 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



DEVENS BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, Universalist Church, Church Ct., 
Charlestown. (Incorporated 1856.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Mrs. Mary J. Day, President; Mrs. Elizabeth G. Hooper, 
Secretary; Mrs. Elizabeth H. Brown, Treasurer. 

The promotion of charitable and benevolent objects in Charles- 
town. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of families aided, about 10. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations . $27 00 

Income from investments and part 

of principal .... 245 40 



Total current receipts . . S272 40 

Cash on hand at beginning of year IS 20 



S290 60 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . , $70 00 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 1 00 

P^o^'isions and supplies . . 200 57 



Total cvirrent expyenses 
i Cash on hand 



$271 57 
19 03 



$290 60 



Value of investments, $4,556.34. 



DISPENSARY FOR WOMEN, 633 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1910.) 

Report for year ending October 10, 1915. 

George ^Y. Kaan, M.D., President; W. Herbert Grant, M.D., 
Secretary; Charles B. Darling, M.D., Treasurer. 

The treatment of poor women suffering from disease, and 
particularly those diseases which are peculiar to their sex. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of treatments during year, 10,159. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,734 66 

406 00 

22 14 

$2,162 SO 
110 90 



$2,273 70 



Cr. 

Salaries and ■wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 
Pro%'isions and suppUes 
Rent 

Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Laundry . 
Telephone 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$574 75 

38 57 
544 00 
541 71 

64 77 
35 95 
74 12 
29 50 

$1,903 37 
370 33 

82,273 70 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



55 



DORCHESTER HOUSE, 7 Gordon PL, Dorchester. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Miss Caroline S. Callender, President; Austin A. Ballon, 
Secretary; Everett H. Sharp, Treasurer; Miss Alice Moore, 
Resident in Charge. 

Industrial, educational, and charitable work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, about 400. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . S3,416 51 

Miscellaneous . . . . 8 20 

Total current receipts . . $3,424 71 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 57 54 



$3,482 25 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




51,503 56 


Printing, postage, and office 


sui> 




plies .... 


. 


137 84 


Rent .... 


. 


442 50 


Heat, light, and power 




225 79 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


162 49 


Classes .... 




572 47 


Payment loans . 




300 00 


Miscellaneous , 




26 80 


Total current expenses 


S3,371 45 


Cash on hand . 




110 80 




S3,482 25 



DORCHESTER RELIEF SOCIETY, 204 Adams St., Dorchester. (Incor- 
porated 1904.) 

Report for j-ear ending September 30, 1915. 

Edwin T. Home, President; S. F. K. Nash, Secretary; Clarence 
B. Humphreys, Treasurer;^ Miss H. Eugenia Bruce, Agent. 

Care of worthy aged poor; aid to persons recommended by 
the x\ssociated Charities; free dispensary for needy persons only; 
support of nurse of Instructive District Nursing Association. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number of families aided, 129. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Collected by agent 
Flower day .... 

Total current receipts 

Deficit 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 



S2,030 81 


200 00 


384 


21 


420 


40 


893 


16 


S3,928 58 


71 


20 


81 


18 


$4,080 96 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. S625 24 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 


pUes .... 


130 70 


Rent .... 


220 00 


Heat, light, and power 


145 21 


Telephone 


65 84 


Associated Charities . 


45 00 


Aid 


. 1,848 97 


Nurse .... 


. 1,000 00 




^,080 96 



Value of investments, $10,407.19. 



Everett H. Sharpe, present treasurer. 



56 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



EASTERN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, 111 Webster St., East Boston. 
(Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1915. 

Rev. J. A. Johnson, President; Charles Rosenquist, Secretary; 
Andrew Nelson, Treasurer; Rev. Oscar Lindegren, Superin- 
tendent. 

Missionary work; conducts the Scandinavian Sailors' and 
Immigrants' Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 1,255, viz., 780 
paying, 312 partly paying, 163 free; outside institution, 17, all 
free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income through Home 
Loan ..... 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$2,499 


57 


100 00 1 


5,697 


21 


200 


00 


19 


62 


$8,516 


40 


391 


92 


$8,908 32 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




$1,995 00 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




plies .... 




32 43 


ProA-isions and supplies 




5,133 19 


Heat, light, and power 




430 70 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


342 55 


Interest and water tax 


. 


456 06 


Telephone 




49 21 


Travel expense . 


. 


39 03 


Miscellaneous . 


• 


67 56 


Total current expenses 


8,545 73 


Cash on hand . 




36? 59 




$8,908 32 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$30,000; amount of mortgage on same, $5,600. 



ELIZABETH PEABODY HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 357 Charles St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Dr. Richard G. Wadsworth, President; Miss Alice A. Burditt, 
Secretary; Edward J. Holmes, Treasurer; Mrs. Eva W. White, 
Head Resident. 

Educational and social work in the immediate neighborhood, 
without regard to age, sex, color, nationality, or creed. Modified 
milk station. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number aided during year, 900, viz., 700 partly paying, 200 
free; number of families aided, 300. 



Part II.l 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



57 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


. $1,062 76 


Salaries and wages . 


$10,770 83 


Subscriptions and donations 


. 16,236 81 


Printing, postage, and oflBce 




Income from investments . 


109 90 


supplies 


382 11 


Fairs and entertainments . 


. 2,778 00 


Provisions and supplies 


3,380 19 


Residents' board 


. 5,538 84 


Heat, light, and power 


2,408 74 


Miscellaneous . 


13 45 


Furnishings and incidental re- 








pairs .... 


2,192 79 






Total current receipts . 


. $25,739 76 


Washing and cleaning 


441 17 


Cash on hand at beginning of 


Telephone 


108 43 


year .... 


938 75 


Settlement work 


1,772 58 






Stenography . 


241 35 






Insurance . • . 


330 68 






Interest on loan 


2,606 77 






Taxes .... 


605 04 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


373 88 




$25,614 56 






Cash on hand . 


1,063 95 




$26,678 51 


$26,678 51 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$147,665.63; amount of mortgage on same, $23,875.80; value of 
investments, $25,863.30. 



ELLIS MEMORIAL AND ELDREDGE HOUSE, INC., 12 Carver St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Mrs. T. Russell Sullivan, President; Emily L. Storer, Secretary; 
George U. Crocker, Treasurer; Miss Jane R. McCrady, Head 
Worker. 

To draw together the best forces in the neighborhood. To 
furnish and promote healthy recreation. To study conditions in 
the interests of the neighborhood. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 



Dr. 

From subscriptions, donations, 

and entertainments . . $8,054 62 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 643 12 



$8,697 74 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. $3,319 18 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 


plies .... 


97 30 


Provisions and supplies 


220 12 


Rent .... 


155 00 


Heat, light, and power 


276 09 


Telephone 


193 70 


Summer camps . 


. 1,495 71 


Sand garden 


740 00 


Playground, etc. 


237 06 


Miscellaneous . 


324 36 


Total current expenses . 


. $7,058 52 


Notes payable . 


. 1,000 00 


Cash on hand . 


639 22 



$8,697 74 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$20,500; amount of mortgage on same, $4,200. 



58 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



EPISCOPAL CITY MISSION, 1 Joy St., Boston. (Incorporated 1843.) 
Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, D.D., President; Charles E. 
Mason, Secretary; George S. Selfridge, Treasurer; Rev. Frederick 
B. Allen, Superintendent. 

To search out the religious needs of the city of Boston, and to 
conduct the missionary work within its limits. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 78, including summer 
workers. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$303 50 


Salaries and wages . 




$26,520 07 


Subscriptions and donations 


39,663 36 


Debit balance . 




10,277 34 


Bequests to income . 


800 00 


Printing, postage, and office 




Income from investments . 


4,670 02 


suppUes 




1,755 29 


Insurance loss, St. Peter's Church 


20 00 


Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 
Heat, light, and power 




1,853 75 

586 00 

1,998 83 


Total current receipts . 


$45,456 88 




Towards fire escapes 


85 95 


F\imishings and incidental 


re- 




From archdeaconry of Lowell . 


83 25 


pairs .... 




1,846 37 


For diocesan missions 


6,289 48 


ReUef, Christmas, etc. 




1,529 92 


For diocesan mission fvmd 


2,805 00 


Interest .... 




1,638 17 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Telephone and water rates 




368 55 


year 


1,022 58 


Insuranoe and taxes 




1,855 70 


For boatswain's locker, from 




Playrooms, exciirsions, etc. 




875 61 


capital .... 


1,200 00 


St. Peter's Church . 




20 00 


Special funds, debit balance 


9,968 50 


St. Andrew's Church 
Gravje Church debts 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 




110 00 

211 91 

1,343 37 




$52,790 88 






Fire escapes, Church Rescue 








Mission 




585 95 


' 




Subtreasurer, Sailors' Haven, 








boatswain's locker 




1,057 82 






Sailors' Home Fund 




250 00 






SaUors' ReUef Fund . 




568 55 






Legal service, Maria Jones 


es- 








tate .... 




532 85 






Oak Island services . 




83 25 






To treasurer. Diocesan Board of 








Missions 




6,289 48 






For diocesan mission fimd 


. 


2,873 14 






Income carried to capital . 




1,297 61 






Cash on hand . 


• 


582 11 




$66,911 64 


$66,911 64 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$239,800; mortgage on same, $26,150; value of investments, 
$98,202.38. 



EVANGELISTIC ASSOCIATION OF NEW ENGLAND, 519 Tremont Tem- 
ple, Boston. (Incorporated 1889.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Allan C. Emery, President; S. M. Sayford, General Secretary 
and Treasurer; Arthur Reddish, Recording Secretary. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



59 



To assist in evangelistic work throughout New England; to 
maintain a bureau for supplying ministers for vacant pulpits; 
to minister to the comfort of patients in the hospitals of Boston 
and vicinity. Little material aid is given, but other assistance is 
rendered to many hospital patients. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 21. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from deposits 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 



year 



$7,972 08 
112 41 
204 99 


$8,289 48 
3,643 79 


$11,933 27 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




. $3,480 00 


Printing, postage, 


and 


office 


supplies 




416 73 


Rent 




600 00 


Light 




9 60 


Hospital visitation 




. 2,383 37 


Evangelistic work 




. 2,371 51 


Miscellaneous . 


nses 


213 67 


Total current expe 


. $9,474 88 


Cash on hand . 




2,468 39 




$11,933 27 



FAITH AND HOPE ASSOCIATION, 18 Huntington Ave., Boston. Summer 
Camp at West Townsend. (Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Mrs. M. Clara Kirby, President and Superintendent; Harold 
V. Archambault, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Taking music and helpful literature to hospitals, old ladies' 
homes, etc. Taking Christmas gifts and necessary comforts to 
sick and needy women and children. Summer camp for tired 
women and girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year: in camp, 136, viz., 45 paying, 81 
partly paying, 10 free; outside camp, 185; number of families 
aided, 8. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Mortgage payable 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$338 75 

2,051 90 

800 00 

$3,190 65 
40 20 



$3,230 85 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


, 


$213 54 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




plies .... 




299 43 


Provisions and supplies 




974 51 


Rent .... 




101 00 


Heat, light, and power 




14 64 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


450 35 


Camp property . 




775 00 


Property additions 




168 41 


Interest and insurance 




45 23 


Miscellaneous . 




179 74 


Total current expenses . 


$3,221 85 


Cash on hand . 




9 00 




$3,230 85 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
,600; amount of mortgage on same. 



60 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL, Thompson's Island, Boston. (In- 
corporated 1835.) 

Report for year ending January 15, 1915. 

Alfred Bo wditch, President; Tucker Daland, Secretary; Arthur 
Adams, Treasurer; Charles H. Bradley, Superintendent. 

The training and education of worthy boys of fair physical and 
mental condition, between the ages of ten and sixteen years, for 
higher school and useful occupations. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 21. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 124, viz., 101 partly 
paying, 23 free; outside institution, 3 partly paying. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 

Subscriptions and donations 

Income from investments . 

Income special fund 

Scholarships 

Sales .... 



Total current receipts 
Loans to income 



$6,346 58 
6,880 80 

17,345 25 
500 00 
500 00 
798 68 


$32,371 31 
6,544 82 


$38,916 13 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$13,473 73 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies 


1,038 05 


Provisions and supplies 


5,533 29 


Clothing 


1,368 23 


Heat, Ught, and power 


2,860 95 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


5,482 69 


Farm .... 


4,076 54 


Medical .... 


156 29 


Interest and insurance 


504 08 


Miscellaneous . 


4,027 28 


Total current expenses . 


$38,521 13 


Special fund 


395 00 




$38,916 13 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$43,075; value of investments, $348,852.75. 



THE FAULKNER HOSPITAL CORPORATION, Centre St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Randall G. Morris, President; Miss Emily G. Denny, Secretary; 
Ingersoll Bowditch, Treasurer; Miss Edith I. Cox, Matron. 

General hospital. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 42. 

Number aided during year, 610, viz., 415 paying, 16 partly 
paying, 179 free. 



Part II.l 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



61 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . . . . 



$22,470 53 

10 00 

20,281 74 

$42,762 27 

4,437 84 



$47,200 11 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$12,479 92 


Printing, postage, and ofl&ce 




supplies .... 


190 92 


Provisions and supplies 


12,843 92 


Heat, light, and power 


3,630 18 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs 


989 13 


Medicine and apparatus . 


501 84 


Accrued interest on bonds bought 


6 00 


Miscellaneous .... 


4,358 70 


Total current expenses . 


$35,000 61 


Income invested 


22 74 


Cash on hand .... 


12,176 76 




$47,200 11 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$158,108.38; value of investments, $411,996.28. 



FEDERATED JEWISH CHARITIES OF BOSTON, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1908.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1915. 

Hon. Abraham C, Ratshesky, President; Edward E. Norton, 
Secretary; Simon E. Hecht, Treasurer; Mrs. Martha Silverman, 
Superintendent. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $86,716 45 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,447 00 

Income from investments . . 229 92 



Total current receipts . . $89,393 37 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 3,476 72 



$92,870 09 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and office 
suppUes . . . . 

Investments .... 
Seven constituent societies 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand .... 



$9,636 51 

2,022 40 

6,592 50 

66,125 00 

$84,376 41 
8,493 68 

$92,870 09 



Value of investment held by trustees for benefit of society, 
$13,587.50. 



FIRST SPIRITUALIST LADIES' AID ASSOCIATION, 9 Appleton St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1882.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Anna M. Clarke, President; Annie J. Haynes, Secretary; May 
A. Mack, Treasurer. 

To assist worthy Spiritualists and others in need. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 
Number aided during year, 4; families aided, 10. 



62 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . 
Income from investments 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$28 60 
20 00 
40 00 

$88 60 
822 29 



$910 89 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $144 40 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 9 00 

Rent 165 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 8 00 

Total current expenses . . $326 40 

Cash on hand .... 584 49 



$910 89 



FLORENCE CRITTENTON LEAGUE OF COMPASSION, INCORPORATED, 
executive office, 514 Tremont Temple, Boston; Maternity Home, 701- 
703 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending Deceniber 31, 1914. 

Rev. A. Z. Conrad, D.D., President; Mrs. John Knox Mar- 
shall, Secretary) Edward E. Stevens, Treasurer; Mrs. C. M, 
EUinwood, Superintendent; Clarence R. Preston, General Sec- 
retary. 

For the purpose of reclaiming fallen girls and women, and pro- 
viding hospital care and a home for them and their infants. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 16. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 105, viz., 21 paying, 
27 partly paying, 57 free; also 85 babies; outside institution, 
376. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$1,126 41 


Salaries and wages . 


$7,382 76 


Subscriptions and donations 


14,634 12 


Printing, postage, and office 




Annviities and bequests to income 


3,400 00 


supplies 


381 74 


Income from investments . 


507 04 


Provisions and supplies 


2,748 46 


Membership fees 


166 00 


Rent .... 


530 58 


Sales and concerts . 


1,294 59 


Heat, light, and power 


1,162 42 


Insurance .... 


134 30 


Furnishings and incidental re- 








pairs .... 


611 73 






Total current receipts . 


$21,262 46 


Medicines 


496 73 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Telephone 


262 89 


year 


2,141 02 


Advertising and soliciting . 


948 53 






Laundry- 


843 23 






Insurance 


286 30 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


453 06 




$16,108 43 






Income invested 


3,309 40 






Cash on hand . . . 


3,985 65 




$23,403 48 


$23,403 48 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$18,000; value of investments, $12,327.40. 



Part II.l 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



63 



FORSYTH DENTAL INFIRMARY FOR CHILDREN, Fenway and Hem- 
en^^ay St., Boston. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1915. 

Thomas A. Forsyth, President; Chester B. Humphrey, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer; Dr. Harold deW. Cross, Director. 

Infirmary for the reception and oral treatment (dental, medical, 
and surgical) of children under the age of sixteen years, and of 
such others as the corporation may from time to time determine 
upon. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 79. 

Number aided during year, 8,948, viz., 8,918 partly paying, 
30 free. 

Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 

Total current receipts . 
Sale of securities 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$1,505 19 

787 24 

104,565 37 


$106,857 80 
77,347 50 

799 27 


$185,004 


57 1 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$24,774 79 


Printing, postage, and offict 


i 


supplies 


3.228 89 


Provisions and supplies . 


6,695 03 


Rent .... 


317 50 


Heat, light, and power . 


2,603 63 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




paurs .... 


1,885 44 


Equipment 


53,354 95 


Insurance 


359 68 


Miscellaneous 


1,921 35 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$95,141 26 

88,666 25 

1,197 06 



$185,004 57 



Value of real estate in trust occupied for corporate purposes, 
$850,000; value of investments, about $1,945,752.34. 



THE FRAGMENT SOCIETY, Boston. (Incorporated 1816.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Mrs. F. A. Turner, President; Mrs. R. L. Monks, Secretary; 
Miss Annie A. Hough, 29 Cedar St., Roxbury, Treasurer. 
To supply clothing to needy women and children. 
Number aided during year, 1,983. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $140 00 

Income from investments . . 2,980 54 

Total current receipts . . $3,120 54 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 4,134 09 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and oflBce sup 

plies 
Boots 
Dry goods 
Sewing 
Special relief 

Total current 
Cash on hand 



$15 41 

1,380 00 

1,209 15 

141 92 

179 60 

$2,926 08 
4,328 55 



$7,254 63 

Value of investments, about $21,551.07. 



$7,254 63 



64 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



FRANCES E. WILLARD SETTLEMENT, 38-46 Chambers St., Boston, and 
Old Billerica Rd., Bedford. (Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1915. 

Caroline M. Caswell, President and General Manager; Nellie 
F. Hill, Secretary; Mrs. Elmer A. Stevens, Treasurer. 

For the purpose of providing a home or homes for young 
working women or women earning very low salaries, or those 
training for self-support who need temporary aid, and helping 
strangers who need assistance, etc. 

Number of paid officers or employees^ 29. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 501, viz., 425 pay- 
ing, 62 partly paying, 14 free; outside institution, 1,773, viz., 
1,285 partly paying, 488 free; number of families aided, 500. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$9,137 05 


Salaries and wages . 


$10,901 78 


Subscriptions and donations 


12,760 39 


Printing, postage, and office 




Annuities and bequests to income 


7,500 00 


supplies .... 


1,988 87 


Income from investments . 


1,753 42 


Provisions, supplies, and laundry 


6,637 11 


Entertainments and sales . 


924 81 


Interest, principal, and loans 


3,063 35 


Industrial .... 


1.681 78 


Heat, light, and power 


2,320 20 


Farm ..... 


540 45 


Furnishings, improvements, and 








repairs .... 


7,344 95 






Total current receipts . 


$34,297 90 


Insurance .... 


941 90 


Loans to income 


6,450 00 


Industrial .... 


1.327 19 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Farm and cranberry bog . 


1,986 90 


year 


823 67 


Clubs 


1,044 55 






Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


65 57 




$37,622 37 






Loans paid .... 


3,800 00 






Cash on hand .... 


149 20 




$41,571 57 


$41,571 57 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $117,333; amount of mortgage on same, $51,500; value of 
investments, $17,255.50. 



THE FRANKLIN SQUARE HOUSE, 11 East Newton St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1901.) 

Report for year ending February 28, 1915. 

Rev. George L. Perin, President; J. Porter Russell, Secretary; 
Fred M. Lamson, Treasurer; Miss Castine C. Swanson, Superin- 
tendent. 

To provide a home for working girls at moderate cost. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 144. 

Number aided during year, 1,265, viz., 811 paying, 269 partly 
paying, 185 free. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



65 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Organ receipts 
Entertainments 
Miscellaneous rents 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Loan on mortgage . 
Sale of investments 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



$126,323 07 

9,895 50 

1,495 12 

378 00 

144 30 

30 29 

1,310 19 

$139,576 47 

225,000 00 

1,350 01 

34,825 45 



$400,751 93 



Cr. 



and office 



Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
General repairs 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings . 
Laundry expense 
Hospital expense 
Advertising . 
Auditing 
Insurance 
Interest 
Miscellaneous 



Total current expenses 
New building construction 
Furnishings and equipment for 

new building 
Cash on hand 



$49,648 89 

1,589 84 

50,451 91 

8,163 76 

10,752 53 

3,102 05 

1,558 34 

319 15 

1,081 65 

375 00 

1,154 69 

1,759 66 

1,287 72 



$131,245 19 
226,370 82 

24,292 75 
18,843 17 

$400,751 93 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $509,276.70; amount of mortgage on same, $225,000; 
value of investments, $21,035.20. 

FRATJEN VEREIN, 17 Everett Ave., Dorchester. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Henrietta Benjamin, President; Mrs. Jetty Robinson, 
Secretary; Mrs. Julia Stone, Treasurer. 
To establish a convalescent home. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,336 80 

Income from investments . . 100 87 

Total current receipts . . $1,437 67 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 2,431 11 



$3,868 78 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and oflSce sup- 
plies $416 17 

Rent 50 00 

Purchase of home at 17 Everett 

Ave., Dorchester . . . 2,000 00 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$2,466 17 
1,402 61 

$3,868 78 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $2,000. 



THE FREDERICK E. WEBER CHARITIES CORPORATION, 53 State St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending July 18, 1915. 

Arthur L. Howard, President; Howard P. Wise, Clerk; George 
M. Amerige, Treasurer. 

Aids educational or charitable institutions, and relieves indi- 
vidual need regardless of nationality or color. 



66 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 178 individuals and 8 corporations. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries (loans repaid 

and interest) 
Income from investments . 
Refunds ..... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$304 14 

18,894 41 

555 41 

S19,753 96 

110 21 



$19,864 17 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and office 

suppUes 
Rent 
Educational purposes and relief 

of individual need 
Taxes 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



S2,200 00 

8 91 
300 00 

8,620 81 

91 00 

58 59 

$11,279 31 

8,575 00 

9 86 

$19,864 17 



Value of investments, $379,345. 

FRENCH WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 28 Appleton St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Mrs. D. R. Craig, President; Mrs. W. H. Carter, Secretary; 
Marcel L. Orleans, Treasurer; Mrs. E. A. Pache, Matron. 

Home for French-speaking girls; secures employment. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 108, viz., 106 pay- 
ing, 2 partly paying; outside institution, 4. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Sales .... 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$2,056 35 
549 00 
321 30 

S2,926 65 
221 85 



$3,148 50 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies ..... 
Provisions and supplies 

Rent 

Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$633 75 



1,032 


28 


750 00 


158 


96 


224 


63 


$2,800 77 


347 


73 


S3,148 50 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $7,250; amount of mortgage on same, $4,750. 



GERMAN AID SOCIETY OF BOSTON AND VICINITY, 39 Charity BuHding, 
43 Hawkins St., Boston. (Incorporated 1848.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

C. W. Holtzer, President; Oscar A. Schmidt, Secretary; Se- 
bastian Gahm, Treasurer; J. A. Weigmann, Agent. 

Aids German immigrants to find employment, provides tem- 
porary support, and aids poor German residents in Boston 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



67 



without regard to creed, giving food, fuel, rent, clothing, and 
medical aid. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 114; number of families aided, 190. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,385 00 

Income from investments . . 1,471 20 

Total current receipts . . $2,856 20 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 800 97 



$3,657 17 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . S500 00 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 36 18 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,668 11 

Assistance in cash . . . 454 00 

Heat, light, and power . , 34 83 

Safe deposit box . . . 10 00 

Treasurer's bond . . . 25 00 

Telephone . . . . 42 00 

Miscellaneous , . . . 16 31 

Total current expenses . . $2,786 43 

Cash on hand . . . . 870 74 

$3,657 17 



Value of investments, $36,277.22. 



GERMAN LADIES' AID SOCIETY OF BOSTON (ALTENHEIM), 2222 
Centre St., West Roxbury. (Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending September 26, 1915. 

Mrs. Lizzie Munz, President; Mrs. Jacobina Schriftgiesser, 
Secretary; Miss Anna Bauer, Treasurer. 

Assists needy German widows and orphans, and maintains a 
home for aged German men and women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number of families aided during year, 17. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Receipts for home 
Cash on hand at beginning 

year .... 



of 



$507 65 

275 00 

22 32 

$804 97 

238 86 

8,509 25 

24,529 40 



$34,082 48 



Cr. 
Salaries an d wages 
Salaries (home) 
Printing, postage, and 

supplies 
Provisions and supplie 
Shoes and underwear 
German relief fund 
Altenheim fund 
Contracts on building 
Maintenance of home 
Execution of Deihl estate 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Loan returned 
Income invested 
Cash on hand , 



office 



$45 00 


532 


50 


19 


51 


499 


00 


206 


23 


200 


00 


172 


00 


1,245 


34 


1,711 


39 


1,636 


66 


1,415 


56 



$7,683 19 

38 86 

6,470 04 

19,890 39 

$34,082 48 



Value of 
$6,470.04. 



real estate, $48,266.82; value of investments. 



68 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 



GIRLS' FRIENDLY SOCIETY HOME, Milford, New Hampshire. (Incor- 
porated 1887.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Mrs. William Lawrence, President; Mrs. James F. Hunnewell, 
Secretary; Harold Peabody, 302 Berkeley St., Boston, Treasurer. 
Vacation home for the members of the Girls' Friendly Society. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 
Number aided during year, 382, all paying. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


Sl,791 00 


Wages .... 


. 


$538 00 


Income from investments . 


510 58 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




Board 


2,164 90 


plies, and telephone 




120 50 


Mivsoellaneous . . . . 


266 83 


Provisions and supplies 
Taxes and insurance . 
Care of trees 




1,897 49 
118 60 
150 00 


Total current receipts 


$4,733 31 


* 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


831 31 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


348 28 






Labor and fuel . 




275 52 






Outside repairs . 




570 75 






Driver and station work 




631 72 






Ticket and railroad expenses 




115 35 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 




199 40 




S4,965 61 






Cash on hand . . . 




599 01 




$5,564 62 


$5,564 62 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, S5,000; value of investments, S9,942.35. 



THE GUILD OF ST. ELIZABETH, 59 East Springfield St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1901.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Miss Maud M. Rockwell, President; Mrs. Gerald Blake, Sec- 
retary; Miss Alice F. Murray, Treasurer; Mrs. Rose Simmons, 
Matron. 

Benevolent work among children of the poor of all national- 
ities and creeds, including day nursery. 

Number of paid employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 403, viz., 278 paying, 10 partly 
paying, 115 free. 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



69 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$178 27 


Salaries and wages 




$1,642 50 


Honorary members . 


770 00 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




Members' fees . 


89 00 


plies .... 


. 


84 97 


Day nursery 


566 13 


Provisions and supplies 




448 57 


Entertainments 


1,466 12 


Interest on mortgage . 




350 00 


Summer outing . 


13 00 


Heat, light, and power 




164 54 


Interest .... 


6 87 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


173 79 






Expenses for entertainments 
Summer outing . 




188 80 
10 00 


Total current receipts 


$3,089 39 


; 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


341 38 


Telephone 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous . 

Total ciu-rent expenses . 




32 27 

33 33 
13 80 




$3,142 57 






Cash on hand . 




288 20 




?3,430 77 


$3,430 77 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $8,000; amount of mortgage, $7,000; value of invest- 
ments, $500. 



HALE HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 



6 Garland 
1897.) 



St., Boston. (Incorporated 



Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Thomas P. Beal, Jr., President; John H. Oakes, Clerk; Ed- 
ward C. Fitz, Treasurer; Ernest C. Amy, Head Worker. 

To foster a spirit of individual independence and neighbor- 
hood co-operation and to promote good citizenship. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Number aided during year, 900, viz., 700 partly paying, 200 
free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


. $9,760 81 


Salaries and wages . 




$4,004 30 


Income from investments . 


688 00 


Printing, postage, and 


office 




Miscellaneous . 


62 64 


suppUes 
Provisions and supplies 




309 05 
250 54 






Total current receipts . 


. $10,511 45 


Rent 




660 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of 


Heat, light, and power 




389 77 


year .... 


. 1,754 50 


Furnishings and incidental re- 








pairs . 


. 


213 90 






Mortgage interest 




212 00 






Camp Hale, boys' camp 




3,300 85 






Clubs, classes, etc. . 




785 44 






Insurance 


. 


71 71 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 




357 20 




$10,554 76 






Cash on hand . 


• 


1,711 19 




$12,265 95 


$12,265 95 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $7,246.77; amount of mortgage on same, $5,300; value 
of investments, $12,971.51. 



70 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



HARRIET TUBMAN HOUSE, 25 Holyoke St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1906.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Julia O. Henson, President; Butler R. Wilson, Secretary; Ella 
A. Gleason, Treasurer; Cornelia R. Robinson, Matron. 

Home for young colored working women, with home comforts, 
at the lowest possible cost; an employment bureau maintained. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 61, viz., 58 paying, 3 partly paying. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $23 00 

Receipts from income of house . 964 28 

Donations and suppers . . 93 33 

Total current receipts . . $1,080 61 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 28 86 



$1,109 47 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Building fund 

Telephone and water rates . 
Laundry and labor 
Harvest supper and other supplies 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$91 75 



17 25 


166 00 


298 91 


212 92 


131 10 


20 11 


87 37 


44 83 


88 73 


$1,058 97 


50 50 


$1,109 47 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $7,500; amount of mortgage on same, $4,000. 



THE HEBREW FREE LOAN SOCIETY, Comer Blue Hill Ave. and Bruns- 
wick St., Boston. (Incorporated 1913.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Nathan Pinanski, President; Louis Pokroisky, Secretary; Selig 
Lipsky, Treasurer. 

To loan money free of interest or charge. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number aided during year, 431. 



Dr. 
Collected from loans 
Collected from members . 
Contributions and donations 
Interest .... 



$26,968 50 

6,527 25 

483 20 

5 95 



Total current receipts , . $33,984 90 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 825 01 



$34,809 91 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Golden book 
Loans 
Postage . 
Miscellaneous 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$591 36 

153 25 

100 00 

33,655 00 

33 15 

70 75 

$34,603 51 
206 40 

$34,809 91 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



71 



THE HEBREW IMMIGRANT AID SOCIETY, 104 Salem St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1904.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1915. 

Isaac Heller, President; J. H. Stone, Secretary; Harris Poorvu, 
Treasurer. 
To aid Hebrew immigrants, particularly detained immigrants. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 
Employs a collector on commission. 
Number aided during year, about 1,600. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations . $809 36 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 5,526 08 



$6,335 44 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. $3,583 00 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 


plies .... 


242 65 


Rent .... 


300 00 


Heat, light, and power 


13 04 


Telephone and telegraph 


173 20 


Transportation and food 


301 29 


Collection fees and expenses 


736 55 


Total ctirrent expenses . 


. $5,349 73 


Cash on hand . 


985 71 




$6,335 44 


Charles St., Boston. (Incorporated 



1902.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1915. 

Louis Hecht, Jr., President; Miss Golde Bamber, Secretary 
and Superintendent; Albert Van Raalte, Treasurer. 

Trade and industrial training of the daughters of immigrants. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 
Number aided during year, 270. 



Dr. 

Federation .... $3,500 00 

Baron de Hirsch fund . . 500 00 

Interest 656 17 

Rent Women's Hebrew Sewing 

Society 450 00 

Work 59 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 160 70 

Total current receipts . . $5,325 87 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 806 57 

$6,132 44 



Cr. 



Salaries .... 
Expenses .... 
Rent .... 


. $2,832 75 

. 1,933 15 

900 00 


Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 


. $5,665 90 
466 54 



$6,132 44 



Value of investments, $18,000. 



72 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



HEBREW LADIES' MOSHEV ZEKAINIM ASSOCIATION, 21 Queen St., 
Dorchester. (Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1915. 

Robert Finkelstein, President; Harris Koritz, Secretary; Mrs. 
Fannie R. Titlebaum, Treasurer; Baer Solomon, Superintendent. 

Home for Jewish men and women not less than sixty years 
of age, living in Boston or vicinity. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year, 96. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Entertainments 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$1,305 50 

10,687 46 

430 09 

3,133 26 


$15,556 31 
1,000 00 

59 63 


$16,615 94 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Pro\'isions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Paid on mortgage 
Interest .... 
Collections 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$3,966 43 

324 77 
5,111 70 

1.166 66 

3.167 23 
500 00 
235 28 

1,292 85 
826 82 

$16,591 74 
24 20 

$16,615 94 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $50,000; mortgage on same, $1,000; value of invest- 
ments, $5,000. 



HEBREW WOMEN'S SEWING SOCIETY, 154 Charles St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending May 7, 1915. 

Mrs. J. M. Herman, President; Mrs. I. K. E. Prager, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. L. Baer, Treasurer. 

To clothe and befriend the Jewish poor, and give recreation 
to poor children and mothers of the Jewish faith. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 1,105, viz., 326 adults, 779 children. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



73 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Federated Jewish Charities 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$391 90 


200 00 


472 


79 


5,100 


00 


$6,164 


69 


299 


67 


1,289 


58 


$7,753 94 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$890 00 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies . . . . . 


50 00 


Provisions and supplies 


4,780 34 


Rent 


450 00 


Se^^-ing and cooking classes . 


154 35 


Insurance . . . . 


10 20 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


253 20 


Total current expenses 


$6,588 09 


Income invested 


963 71 


Cash on hand . 


202 14 



$7,753 94 



Value of investments, $11,050. 



HOLY TRINITY CATHOLIC SCHOOL AND SOCIETY (ST. FRANCIS 
ORPHANAGE AND HOME FOR AGED), Fulda St., Roxbury. (Incor- 
porated 1879.) 

Report for year ending December, 1914. 

Rev. Joseph Faber, S.J., President and Treasurer; Matthias 
Brock, Secretary; Sister Mary Salome, O.S.F., Matron. 

Home for children (boys from three to twelve years, inclusive; 
girls, three to sixteen years, inclusive); also aged women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 38, viz., 19 paying, 13 



paying, 6 free. 

Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Board .... 
Miscellaneous . 



$1,181 73 

2,797 05 

200 00 



Total current receipts . . $4,178 78 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 355 03 



$4,533 81 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office sup 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Clothes and shoes 
Medicine . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



partly 



$589 50 

40 14 

1,976 90 

303 63 

850 20 

305 86 

40 33 

30 00 

$4,136 56 
397 25 

$4,533 81 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $16,800; amount of mortgage on same, $9,000. 



HOME FOR AGED COLORED WOMEN, 22 Hancock St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1864.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Joseph P. Loud, President; Miss Lucy Parsons, Clerk; Robert 
Homans, Treasurer; Mrs. Mary E. Armistead, Matron. 

Support of indigent aged colored women in the Home and 
partial support of other such women outside the Home. 



74 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 20; outside insti- 
tution, 58. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $484 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 1,111 75 

Income from investments . . 7,877 24 

Miscellaneous . . . . 16 87 



Total current receipts . . $9,489 86 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 351 44 



$9,841 30 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$1,893 29 


Printing, postage, and oflSce sup- 




plies ..... 


59 37 


Provisions and supplies 


2,599 85 


Heat, light, and power 


510 93 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


395 84 


Outside aid .... 


2,990 00 


Insurance .... 


13 00 


Telephone and water rates . 


64 13 


Accrued interest on investments . 


50 13 


Funerals and care of cemetery lots 


68 50 


Miscellaneous .... 


60 70 


Total current expenses . 


$8,705 74 


Cash on hand .... 


1.135 56 




$9,841 30 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $20,000; value of investments, $162,092.60. 



HOME FOR AGED COUPLES, 409-417 Walnut Ave. and 2055 Columbus 
Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1884.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Elizabeth Abbott Carleton, President; Gladys L. Damon, Sec- 
retary; Arthur H. Damon, Treasurer; H. C. Wingate and Eliza- 
beth Harley, matrons. 

Protestant home for American couples who have seen better 
days and are upwards of sixty-five years of age. Admission fee, 
$400, and conveyance of property to the Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 21. 

Number aided during year, 90. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations . $2,175 00 
From beneficiaries . . . 3,000 00 
Annuities and bequests to in- 
come 1,078 74 

Income from investments . 31,283 00 

Sales of rights ... 67 56 

Legacies . . . . 74,646 45 

Miscellaneous . . . 1,496 74 

Total current receipts . . $113,747 49 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 59,158 66 



$172,906 15 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$8,524 92 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


542 38 


Provisions and supplies . 


9,987 17 


Rent of safety vaults 


115 00 


Heat, light, power, and tele- 




phone .... 


3,163 37 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


1,432 13 


Annuities .... 


131 10 


Taxes 


127 72 


Fire escape account 


3,274 34 


Treasurer's bond and insurance 


235 87 


Hospital, medical attendance, 




medicines, and funerals 


648 80 


Total current expenses 


$28,182 80 


Securities purchased 


108,383 87 


Cash on hand 


36,339 48 




$172,906 15 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



75 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $203,100; value of investments, $872,267.53. 



HOME FOR AGED MEN, 133 West Springfield St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1860.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Charles E. Rogerson, President; Charles A. Coolidge, Clerk; 
Charles W. Jones, Treasurer; Mrs. Mary A. Stevens, Superin- 
tendent. 

Providing a home for and extending outside aid to respectable 
worthy men at least fifty-five years of age who have resided in 
Boston during the ten years preceding their application for re- 
lief. Admission fee, $150. 

Number of paid employees, 21. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 51; outside insti- 
tution, 95. 



Dr. 

Annuities and bequests . . $14,258 50 

Income from investments , . 39,159 50 

Austin fund income . . . 1,200 00 

Total current receipts , . $5-1,618 00 

Cash on hand at begiiming of 

year 1,933 14 



$56,551 14 



Cr. 



Printing, postage, and oflBce 
supplies 

Provisions and supplies 

Medical and funeral expenses 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Insurance 

Mt. Hope Cemetery 

Outside beneficiaries 

Improvements . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Investments 
Cash on hand . 



$8,958 15 

531 57 
7,375 90 
1,170 16 
2,656 90 

1,037 56 

171 84 

265 00 

17,385 00 

2,251 90 
498 51 

$42,302 49 

11,645 32 

2,603 33 

$56,551 14 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $50,000; value of investments, $829,303. 



HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 108 Revere St., Boston. (Incorporated 1849.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Winthrop H. Wade, President; Frank W. Kaan, Secretary; 
William P. Blake, Treasurer; Maria F. Ladd, Matron. 

Home for women of American parentage who have resided 
in Boston for ten years preceding application for admission and 
w^ho are at least sixty-five years of age. Admission fee, S150. 
Assistance given to those outside of the Home and to aged 
nurses, being beneficiaries of the Doane and Edward Austin funds. 



76 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1' 



Number of paid officers or employees, 37. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 92; outside insti- 
tution, 135. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From Edward Austin fund 
Sale of old material . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$1,736 00 

10 00 

47,678 62 

1,200 00 

45 45 


$50,670 07 
14,643 86 

3,000 57 


$68,314 50 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental 

pairs .... 
Outside beneficiaries 
Edward Austin fund beneficiaries 
Doane fund beneficiaries . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Temporary loan paid ofif . 
Cash on hand . 



$16,019 34 
14,408 49 
3.774 12 

3,489 61 
6,549 37 
1,275 00 
5,820 73 
12,155 33 

$63,491 99 
1,800 00 
1,000 00 
2,022 51 

$68,314 50 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $200,612.29; value of investments, $872,499.13. 



HOME FOR DESTITUTE CATHOLIC CHILDREN OF BOSTON, 788 Har- 
rison Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1864.) 

Report for year ending January 14, 1915. 

James W. Dunphy, President; William J. Porter, Secretary; 
John A. Bruen, Treasurer; Daniel J. Pyne, Superintendent. 

Temporary care of destitute Catholic children (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, 1,648. Children cared for in 
foster homes, 887, all free. Monthly average number of children 
under supervision in foster homes, 887. Number of placing-out 
visitors, 2. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Ladies' Aid Society . 
From real estate 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



Cr. 



$7,325 80 


Salaries and wages . 


$6,540 00 


11,164 66 


Printing, postage, and office 




4,767 17 


supplies .... 


735 34 


12,329 00 


Provisions and supplies 


13,967 86 


1,179 54 


Heat, light, and power 


1,783 23 


20 85 


Furnishings and incidental re- 






pairs 


982 76 




$36,787 02 


Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


2,367 19 


8,392 87 


$26,376 38 




Income invested 


12,534 72 




Cash on hand .... 


6,268 79 


$45,179 89 


$45,179 89 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $140,000; value of investments, $141,332.92. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



77 



HOME FOR JEWISH CHILDREN, Canterbury St., comer Austin St., 
Dorchester. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending October 30, 1915. 

David A. Lourie, President; Mark Stone, Financial Secretary; 
Oscar Grosberg, Treasurer; Solomon Z. Prokesch, Superintendent. 
Home for destitute Jewish children (boys and girls). 
Number of paid officers or employees, 21. 
Number aided during year, 166. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Federated Jewish Charities 
Overseers of the poor 
Leopold Morse Home 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



Cr. 



$505 73 


Salaries and wages . 


$8,136 91 


25,000 00 


Printing, postage, and office 




208 00 


supplies 


117 34 


800 00 


Provisions and supplies 


10,613 80 


65 19 


Interest on mortgage 


650 00 




Heat, light, and power 


2,235 36 




$26,578 92 


Furnishings and incidental re- 






pairs .... 


679 27 


406 88 


Clothing 


1,791 98 




Medical attendance and supplies 


607 15 




City of Boston, water rates 


304 80 




House necessaries 


473 84 




Laimdry 


1,022 87 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


346 24 




$26,979 56 




Cash on hand . 


6 24 


$26,985 80 


$26,985 80 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, S90,000; amount of mortgage on same, S13,000. 



THE HOUSEHOLD NURSING ASSOCIATION, 6 Marlboro St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Mrs. Mary H. Coolidge, President; Mrs. Anna L. Coolidge, 
Clerk; George W. Brainard, Treasurer; Ann E. Murray, Su- 
perintendent. 

Care of the sick in the home. 

Number of paid officers or emploj'ees, about 51. 

Number aided during year, 505. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$10,835 97 


Salaries and wages . 


. $14,692 34 


Subscriptions and donations 


4,246 00 


Printing, postage, and 


office 


Interest ..... 


1 34 


supplies 


161 35 


Telephone charges repaid . 


31 11 


Rent 


469 31 


Rent received .... 


484 64 


Heat and light 


77 80 


Miscellaneous .... 


8 05 


Telephone 


319 44 






Miscellaneous . 


194 93 


Total current receipts . 


$15,607 11 




Cash on hand at beginning of 




Total current expenses 


. $15,915 17 


year ..... 


659 99 


Cash on hand . 


351 93 




$16,267 10 


$16,267 10 



78 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



HOUSE OF THE ANGEL GUAEDIAN, TRUSTEES OF THE, S5 Vernon 
St., Eoxbury. (Incorporated 1853.) 

Report for j-ear ending December 31, 1914. 

Brother Jude, President, Treasurer and Superior; Brother 
Cleophas, Secretary. 

An asylum for destitute and orphan boys; also for delinquent 
children, to save them from commitment; gives educational and 
industrial training. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 663, viz., 148 paying, 279 partly 
paying, 236 free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $19,689 66 

Annuities and bequests to income 4,665 68 

Income from investments . . 3,237 50 

Work industrial school . . 4,226 35 

Board, shoes, and clothes . , 24,087 09 
Miscellaneous . . . .6,914 33 

Total current receipts . . $62,820 61 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 3,317 93 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 
supplies 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, hght, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

^lisceUaneous . 

Total current expenaes . 
Paid on property 
Cash on hand . 



$66,138 54 



$7,779 60 

476 55 

25,236 OS 

3,415 51 

987 57 
440 66 

$38,335 97 

27,000 00 

802 57 

$66,138 54 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $128,100; unoccupied, $243,900; value of investments, 
§47,500. 



HOUSE OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN, Francis and Binney Sts., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1861.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Joseph S. Bigelow, President; Miss Catherine A. Codman, 
Secretary; Francis W. Hunnewell, Treasurer; Miss Louise M. 
Coleman, Superintendent. 

A hospital for white women and children, without condition 
of religion, nationality, or residence. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 22. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 211, all free; out- 
side institution, 2, free. 



Part IL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



79 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$7,923 89 


Salaries and wages . 


$8,926 76 


Annuities and bequests to income 


8,800 00 


Printing, postage, and office 




Income from inveatmenta . 


14,249 95 


supplies .... 


353 84 


Miscellaneous .... 


19 37 


Provisions and supplies 


9,185 14 






Insurance, box vault, and tax , 
Heat, light, and power 


318 62 
4,172 82 


Total current receipts . 


$30,993 21 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Furnishings and incidental re- 




year 


180 34 


pairs ..... 
Housekeeping and hospital sup- 


2,281 15 






plies 


3,316 22 






Water and ice . 


1,001 96 






Chaplain .... 


400 00 






Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


43S 30 




$30,394 81 






Income invested 


655 22 






Cash on hand .... 


123 52 




$31,173 55 


$31,173 55 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $300,000; value of investments, $330,000. 



HOUSE OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD, 841 Huntington Ave., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1870.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, 'President; Sister M. St. 
Anselm, Secretary; Sister M. St. Florence, Treasurer. 

The protection of girls in danger. The education, manual and 
mental, of unfortunate girls and women, without distinction of 
race or creed. 

Number of paid employees, 11. 

Number aided during year: 516, viz., 5 partly paying, 511 free. 



Dr. 
Industries .... 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from deposits 
Other sources .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



1 

$69,486 73 

3,650 00 

1.50 08 

967 75 


$74,254 56 
10,311 22 


$84,565 78 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$9,055 00 


Printing, postage, and 


office 




supplies 




1,491 88 


Provisions and supplies 




40,832 17 


Water 




1,220 69 


Heat, light, and power 




5,375 15 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . 


. 


22,385 70 


Miscellaneous . 




1,331 47 


Total current expenses 


$81,692 06 


Cash on hand . 




2,873 72 




$84,565 78 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $405,000; value of investments, $30,819.73. 



80 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



HOWARD BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, 14 Beacon St., Boston. (Incorpo- 
rated 1818.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Rev. Daniel W. Waldron, President; Dr. Winfred B. Bancroft, 
Secretary; John A. Bent, Treasurer. 

Relief of the sick and destitute in the city of Boston. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number of families aided, 1,130. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Income from trust estate . 

Total current receipts . 
Deficit .... 



$60 00 

12,813 59 

9,900 00 

$22,773 59 

332 93 

$23 106 52 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and ofl&ce 
supplies .... 

Coal, groceries, etc. . 
Auditing and bonding 
Miscellaneous .... 



$600 00 

102 76 

22,043 01 

150 GO 

210 75 

$23,106 52 



Value of investments, including trust fund, $508,299.69. 



HUNT ASYLUM FOR DESTITUTE CHILDREN, 10 Eden St., Charlestown. 
(Incorporated 1834.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

James H. Whitman, President; William P. Hart, Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

To aid and provide homes, temporary or permanent, for desti- 
tute Protestant children. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 9. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations $47 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 3,019 80 

Income from investments . . 1,664 31 



Total current receipts . . $4,731 11 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 346 61 



$5,077 72 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and oflSce sup- 
plies .... 
Provisions and supplies (board) 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Clothing . . . • , 

Supervision 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$25 00 

25 00 
794 25 
297 56 
123 34 

98 97 



$1,364 12 
2,695 46 
1,018 14 



$5,077 72 



Value of investments, $40,356.64. 



PartlLl CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 81 



HUNTINGTON INSTITUTE FOR ORPHAN CHILDREN, 147 Milk St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for eight months ending September 30, 1915. 

Horatio A. Lamb, President; Robert B. Stone, Clerk; Robert 
H. Hallowell, Treasurer. 

Providing care and maintenance for needy orphan children, 
and ministering to the welfare of such children through the 
medium of other agencies. (At present the work is done through 
the Boston Children's Aid Society as agents.) 

Number aided, 110. 

Dr. I Cr. 

Income from investments . . $6,144 26 ; Accounting, bookkeeping, and 

i sundry S70 60 

Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 9 16 

Rent of safe deposit vault . . 20 00 

Premium on bond . . 25 00 

Boston Children's Aid Society . 5,599 47 



$6,144 26 



Total current expenses . . So, 724 23 

Cash on hand . . . ' . 420 03 



S6,144 26 



Value of investments, $239,729.37. 



IMMIGRANTS' HOME, 72 Marginal St., East Boston. (Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending July 1, 1915. 

Frank H. Tilton, M.D., President; Miss Mary W. Perry, Sec- 
retary; Miss Hattie B. Cooper, Treasurer; Mrs. A. C. Clark, 
Superintendent. 

To furnish protection and necessary assistance to immigrants, 
especially women and children arriving in Boston on all lines 
of steamers. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

'Number aided during year, 660, viz., 268 paying, 99 partly 
paying, 293 free. Helped on piers, 2,198. 



82 



STATE BOARD OF CHARIT1\ [P. D. i; 



Dr. 



Cj. 



From beneficiaries 


$1,517 41 


Salaries and wages 


. $1,469 69 


Subscriptions and donations 


3,007 64 


Printing and postage . 


49 50 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


18 99 


Provisions and supplies 


1,704 70 






Rent .... 
Heat, light, and power 


32 00 

594 68 


Total current receipts 


$4,544 04 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


271 00 


Furnishings and repairs 


376 10 






Insurance 


100 21 






Telephone 


57 83 






Travel .... 


28 23 






Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 


28 48 




. 84,441 42 






Cash on hand . 


373 62 




S4,815 04 


$4,815 04 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $35,175. 



INDUSTRIAL AID SOCIETY, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1847.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

William P. Fowler, President; Rev. Christopher R. Eliot, Sec- 
retary; "William Atherton, Treasurer; Henry Peterson, General 
Agent. 

To find employment for worthy men and women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 2,249. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$1,199 00 


Salaries and wages 


$3,741 66 


Income from investments 


3,858 74 


Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 




Bequest . . . . . 


4,000 00 


plies 


88 70 






Telephone . . . . 


97 57 






■ Total current receipts 


$9,057 74 


Safe deposit box 


15 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


484 54 


Heat 


133 52 






Office expenses . . . . 


156 00 






Appropriations from Joy fund 


390 00 






Mortgage . . . . . 
Total cvurent expenses 


4,000 00 




$8,622 45 






Cash on hand . . . . 


919 83 




$9,542 28 


$9,542 28 



Value of investments, $65,300. 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR CRIPPLED AND DEFORMED CHILDREN, 
241 St. Botolph St., Boston. (Incorporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1915. 

J. Grafton Minot, President; Thomas K. Cummins, Secretary; 
E. Pierson Beebe, Treasurer; Miss Mary M. Perry, Superin- 
tendent. 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



83 



Education and special training of crippled and deformed 
children. Admission at five years; no restrictions as to sex, 
color, nationality, or creed; no mental defectives taken. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 31. 

Number aided during year, 141. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$10,315 08 


Salaries and wages 


$17,799 24 


Annuities and bequests to income 


60,600 00 


Printing, postage, and office 




Income from investments . 


17,812 03 


supplies 


41 19 






Provisions and supplies 


4,611 15 






Total current receipts 


.$88,727 11 


Heat, light, and power 


1,352 08 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Furnishings and incidental re 




year ..... 


4,100 28 


pairs .... 


1,057 31 






Insurance 


198 40 






Transportation 


3,948 83 






Telephone 


309 46 






Annual report . 


328 16 






Advertising 


251 16 






Relief committee 


. 70 00 






Auditing 


295 00 






Rent of safe 


30 00 


• 




Summer sales room . 


309 05 






Industrial departments 


912 17 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


384 57 




$31,897 77 






Transferred to capital 


60,850 00 






Cash on hand . 


79 62 




$92,827 39 


$92,827 39 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $200,000; value of investments, $429,694. 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 232 Centre St., Dorchester. (In- 
corporated 1855.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Miss Eleanor S. Parker, President; Mrs. Ellerton James, Sec- 
retary; Robert S. Sturgis, Treasurer; Mrs. B. A. Capron, Matron. 

Training school and home for girls of good character, between 
ten and fifteen years of age, without restriction as to color, 
nationality, religion, or residence. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 31, viz., 12 partly 
paying, 19 free; outside institution, 5, all free. 



84 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY 



[P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Miscellaneous . 



$477 50 

2.229 00 

6,009 33 

150 12 



Total current receipts . $8,865 95 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 227 14 



$9,093 09 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




$2,126 50 


Printing, postage, and oflGce 


sup- 




plies .... 




55 00 


Pro\-isions and supplies 




3,180 84 


Laundry and cleaning 




430 88 


Light and telephone . 




143 31 


Furnishings, clothing, and 


inci- 




dental repairs 




1,139 08 


Traveling expenses, matron. 


and 




agent .... 




187 75 


Garden .... 




161 25 


Insurance 




60 00 


Physician, dentist, and chemist . 


121 30 


Gas range and heater . 




347 91 


Miscellaneous . 




442 17 


Total current expenses . 


$8,395 99 


Cash on hand . 




697 10 




$9,093 09 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $19,400; value of investments, $122,437.58. 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL, 55 Van Dyke St., Boston. (Incorporated 1881.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Clarence John Blake, M.D., President; Henry W. Palmer, 
Secretary; Nelson S. Bartlett, Treasurer; Lillian W. Sparrow, 
Superintendent. 

The care of sick infants. The training (by a postgraduate 
course) of nurses, and a course of instruction for nursery maids. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 28. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 303, viz., 46 paying, 
90 partly paying, 167 free; outside institution, 173. 



Dr. 



$21,884 84 



Cr. 



Board 


$2,558 03 


Salaries and wages . 


$7,151 57 


Subscriptions and donations 


8,964 05 


Printing, postage, and office 




Annual endowments 


1,250 00 


supplies .... 


793 30 


Income from investments . 


4,892 58 


Pro\-isions and supplies 


3,894 08 


Nurserj- maids' wages and fees . 


284 85 


•Telephone .... 


310 39 


Entertainments and sales . 


2,405 87 


Heat, light, power, and refriger- 




Miscellaneous .... 


52 78 


ation ..... 
Furnishings and incidental re- 


3,706 57 








Total current receipts . 


$20,408 16 


pairs ..... 


2,045 07 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Laundry .... 


418 87 


year 


1,476 68 


Insurance .... 


175 87 






Interest ..... 


1,742 39 






Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


301 24 




$20,539 35 






Cash on hand .... 


1,345 49 



$21,884 84 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $225,000; amount of mortgage on same, $55,000; value 
of investments, $89,859.63. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



85 



INSTITUTION OF THE LITTLE SISTERS OP THE POOR, 424 Dudley 
St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1872.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Margaret Gillin, President; Jeanne Dubost, Secretary; Anna 
Leib, Treasurer. 

Home for the care of destitute men and women of good moral 
character, without distinction of creed and nationality, at least 
sixty years of age. 

Number aided during year, 240. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Miscellaneous .... 



Total current receipts . $9,338 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,340 00 




$11,678 GO 



Cr. 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . . . . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$6,236 97 
1,367 SO 

2,033 23 

S9,638 00 
2,040 00 

$11,678 00 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $104,100. 



INSTRUCTIVE DISTRICT NURSING ASSOCIATION, 561 Massachusetts 
Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1888.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Ernest Amory Codman, President; Miss Ellen Hale, 
Secretary; Mr. Ingersoll Bowditch, Treasurer; Miss Mary Beard, 
Director. 

Caring for the sick poor in their homes and giving instruction 
in nursing. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 56. 

Number aided during year, 12,103. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



. $22,811 


12 


. 28,108 00 


9,251 


60 


1,599 


70 


. $61,770 


42 


11,122 


41 


$72,892 83 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$55,973 10 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


1,728 56 


Provisions and supplies 


2,274 27 


Rent 


133 37 


Heat, light, and power 


565 87 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


402 40 


Uniforms and supplies for nurses 


1,658 09 


Accrued interest on bonds 


144 58 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


2,700 38 


Total current expenses . 


$65,580 62 


Cash on hand .... 


7,312 21 




$72,892 83 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $11,724.02; value of investments, $179,282.45. 



86 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITi' 



[P. D. 1 



IRWIN FUND, TRUSTEES OF THE, Room 1103, 35 Congress St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending December 9, 1914. 

James A. Neal, President; Sumner Robinson, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

Furnishing aid and comfort to deserving poor, contributing to 
the support of other Massachusetts charitable corporations, and 
educational, charitable, benevolent, and religious work. 

Number aided during year, 3; societies, agencies, and cor- 
porations aided, 28. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Interest .... 



$5,519 01 



Cr, 



$5,500 00 ' Legal ser-dces 

19 01 I Executive committee 
Charity 



Total current exp)enses 
Cash on hand 



$192 40 

40 00 

4,837 90 

$5,070 30 
448 71 

$5,519 01 



JAMAICA PLAIN DISPENSARY, Municipal Building, South St., Jamaica 
Plain. (Incorporated 1882.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1913. 

Rev. Charles F. Dole, President; Edward W. Brewer, Sec- 
retary; IngersoU Bowditch, Treasurer. 

To provide medical attendance and medicines for the sick and 
needy poor within the limits of former Ward 23. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 246. 



Dr. 

Cash on hand . 
Income from investments 



I Cr. 

$399 51 ' Salaries and wages . . $348 40 
9S4 75 j Printing, postage, and office sup- 

j plies ..... 7 53 

Care of patients . 356 51 

Miscellaneous . 20 55 

Total current expenses . $732 99 

Cash on hand .... 651 27 

$1,384 26 $1,384 26 



Value of investments, §21,405.56. 



JAMAICA PLAIN FRIENDLY SOCIETY. Municipal BuUding, Jamaica 
Plain. (Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1915. 

Orville R. Chadwell, M.D., President; Caroline E. Chickering, 
Clerk; E. W. Clark, Treasurer; Katherine Williamson, Agent. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



87 



To relieve temporary distress and befriend the needy, without 
regard to age, sex, color, creed, or nationality, in the Jamaica 
Plain district. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number of families aided during year, 199. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
For special purposes . 
Thanksgiving collection 
Donations from local clubs 
Cash returned . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



. Sl,33-t 95 


Salaries and wages 


. S931 35 


355 89 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 


156 85 


plies .... 


148 27 


27 58 


Provisions and supplies 


445 09 


85 00 


Rent .... 


10 00 


92 53 


Boots and shoes 


82 65 




Coal .... 
Advisory committee . 


127 57 
493 00 


. S2,052 80 


r 390 16 


Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 


177 11 




. S2.415 04 




Cash on hand . 


27 92 


$2,442 96 


S2,442 96 



Value of real estate owned, S7,900; amount of mortgage on 
same, 85,000; value of investmicnts, 88,000. 



JAMAICA PLAIN NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 101 Carolina 
Ave., Jamaica Plain. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Miss Cornelia Bowditch, President; Mrs. Charles S. Penhallow, 
Secretary; Robert B. Stone, Treasurer; Miss Ella B. Westcott, 
Head TForker. 

A neighborhood center; to promote civic betterment and main- 
tain industrial classes and clubs for boys, girls, and adults, and 
a playground during the summer. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $122 02 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,822 50 

Income from investments . 155 37 

From fairs and entertainments 1,173 26 

Total current receipts . . S3, 273 15 

Loans to income . 60 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 176 00 



S3, 509 15 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . S2,20S 64 
Printing, postage, and general 

expense .... 246 22 

Pro-^-isions and supplies . . 199 67 

Rent and maintenance of flat . 362 24 
Heat, light, power, and house 

expense .... 398 34 

Garden work expense . . 74 87 

Christmas entertainment . . 17 20 

Total current expenses . . $3,507 18 

Cash on hand . . . . 1 97 

$3,509 15 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, 84,645.88; value of investments, 86,640.03. 



88 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



JEWISH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION, Metaphysical Club 
Rooms, 30 Huntington Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1908.) 

Report for year ending May 14, 1915. 

Hannah I. Cone, President; Minna C. Greenberg, Secretary; 
Lilly Krasnoff, Treasurer. 

To aid need}^ Jewish consumptives through the Mt. Sinai 
Hospital. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,737 29 

Interest 1 84 

Total current receipts . . $1,749 13 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 135 99 



$1,885 12 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and office sup 

plies .... 
Rent .... 

Expense of ball and bazaar . 
Donation to Mt. Sinai 
Donation to war sufferers . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$119 10 

31 00 

268 75 

800 00 

25 00 

$1,243 85 
641 27 

$1,885 12 



JEWISH CHILDREN'S AID SOCIETY OF BOSTON, 585 Boylston St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1915. 

Mrs. N. A. Pelonsky, President; Mrs. Alexander Rose, Sec- 
retary; Mrs. Josiah Bon, Treasurer. 

To give vocational training to poor children; to enable them 
to become self-supporting. 

Number aided during year, 48. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Happy day fund 

Luncheon 

Tag day in Winthrop 

Ball 



$495 00 

68 50 

6 30 

170 48 

1,567 80 



Total current receipts . . $2,308 08 

Cash on hand at beginning of 'year 2,163 67 



$4,471 75 



Cr. 



Regular aid to mothers with chil- 




dren ..... 


$1,220 60 


Tuition of children 


268 77 


Printing and postage . 


126 25 


Payment to fund for unemployed 


50 00 


Clothing 


79 47 


Salem relief fund 


270 48 


Rent 


50 00 


Donations to Milk and Baby 




Hygiene Association 


10 00 


Magazines for Home for Jewish 




Children .... 


13 99 


Total current expenses . 


$2^389 56 


Cash on hand .... 


2,382 19 




$4,471 75 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



89 



JOHN BOYLSTON'S CHARITABLE DONATIONS FOR THE BENEFIT 
AND SUPPORT OF AGED POOR PERSONS AND OF ORPHANS AND 
DESERTED CHILDREN, TRUSTEES OF, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1803.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1915. 

William P. Fowler, Chairman and Treasurer; William H. 
Hardy, Secretary. 

Aid of persons over fifty years of age who have seen bistter 
days, and support of orphans, and deserted children until four- 
teen years of age; settlement in Boston required. 

Number aided during year, 46. 



Dr. 
Income from investments 
Note 



$7,399 78 
2,000 00 



Total current receipts . . S9,399 78 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 4,656 74 



$14,056 52 



Cr. 



Pensions to adults 
Board of children 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$775 00 
5,740 26 

$6,515 26 
4,481 25 
3,060 01 

$14,056 52 



Value of investments, $198,800. 



JOHN HOWARD INDUSTRIAL HOME, 560 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for j^ear ending December 31, 1914. 

Rev. Howard N. Brown, President; Howard W. Brown, Clerk; 
Redington Fiske, Treasurer; Albert Arnold, Superintendent. 

Home for discharged prisoners. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 764, all free; out- 
side institution, 941, all free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Wood yard receipts . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



Cr. 



$6,883 85 


Salaries and wages . 


$7,404 47 


1,027 25 


Printing, postage, and office 




20,288 99 


supplies 


1,778 84 


40 50 


Provisions and supplies 


4,562 30 




Heat, light, and power 


875 88 




$28,240 59 


Furnishings and incidental re- 






pairs .... 


380 53 


2,519 76 


Stable and horses (wood yard) 


1,365 71 




Insurance 


140 30 




Wood .... 


10,611 54 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


816 67 




$27,936 24 




Income invested 


876 39 




Cash on hand . 


1,947 72 


$30,760 35 


$30,760 35 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $20,750; value of investments, $17,402.50. 



90 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



LADIES' HELPING HAND AUXILIARY TO THE HOME FOR DESTITUTE 
JEWISH CHILDREN, 615 Canterbury St., Dorchester. (Incorporated 
1908.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1915. 

Mrs. H. Sonnabend, President; Mrs. M. M. Werner, Secretary; 
Mrs. George Wyner, Treasurer. 

To aid the Home for Jewish Children; to work for the com- 
fort and welfare of the children of the Home so that they may 
be self-supporting when they leave the Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Employs a collector on commission. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,298 50 

Entertainments .... 497 91 

Bank interest .... 39 62 

Total current receipts . . $1,836 03 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 2,566 00 



Cr. 



$4,402 03 



Salaries and wages 


$316 85 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies 


127 68 


Provisions and supplies 


80 84 


Trade and music instruction 


417 85 


Clothing 


265 06 


Portable buildings 


318 90 


Dental room supplies 


151 62 


Miricellaneous . . . . 


57 84 


Total current expenses . 


$1,736 64 


Cash on hand . . . , 


2,665 39 




$4,402 03 



LADIES' UNITY CLUB, 64 Bartlett St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. Carolyn E. Bell, President; Mrs. Ina F. Main, Secretary; 
Miss Carrie J. Littlefield, Treasurer. 
Home for aged women. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 
Number aided during year, 10. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,000 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,208 10 

Income from investments . . 296 85 

Miscellaneous . . . . 4 35 

Total current receipts . . $2,509 30 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 853 51 



$3,362 81 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 



$896 62 



plies 


12 75 


Provisions and supplies 


817 68 


Heat, light, and power 


257 47 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


590 72 


Drugs, nurse, and undertaker 


209 43 


Miscellaneous .... 


163 22 


Total current expenses . 


$2,947 89 


Cash on hand .... 


414 92 




$3,362 81 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $10,000; value of investments, $7,228.43. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



91 



LEND-A-HAND SOCIETY, 101 Tremont St., Boston. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Rev. Christopher R. EHot, President; Mrs. Martha Adams 
Leland, Secretary; Benjamin H. Jones, Treasurer;'^ Miss Annie 
F. Brown, Superintendent. 

Union of Lend-a-Hand clubs to meet emergencies, assist in 
charitable work, etc.; provides vacations for needy men. 

Number' of paid officers or employees, 2. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $4,305 61 

Bequest 3,007 39 

Income from investments . . 2,216 56 

Miscellaneous .... 163 10 

Total current receipts . . $10,692 66 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,940 00 



$11,633 49 



Cr. 



Salaries .... 


$1,271 48 


Rent .... 


400 00 


Lend-a-Hand book mission 


1,809 64 


Outings .... 


408 45 


Special charities 


1,598 44 


Donations 


466 39 


Printing, postage, etc. 


261 86 


Miscellaneous . 


149 96 


Total current expenses . 


$6,366 22 


Invested 


3,007 39 


Cash on hand . 


2,259 88 




$11,633 49 



Value of investments, $50,618.96. 

LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 68 and 80 Emerald St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1896.) 

Beport for year ending May 31, 1915. 

Mrs. B. Preston Clark, President; Miss Mary Bryant, Secre- 
tary; B. Preston Clark, Treasurer; John D. Adams, Director 
in Charge. 

Neighborhood work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number aided during year, 1,000, viz., 780 partly paying, 220 
free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$1,243 21 

14,918 03 

554 41 

$16,715 65 

6,823 00 



$22,538 65 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$10,738 60 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


285 05 


Provisions and supplies 


4,749 92 


Heat, light, and power 


1,093 66 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


771 83 


Total current expenses . 


$17,639 06 


Cash on hand .... 


4,899 59 



$22,538 65 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $102,000; value of investments $5,939.26. 



Josiah M. Fowler, present treasurer. 



92 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



THE LUTHERAN IMMIGRANT BOARD, 11 Henry St., East Boston. 

(Incorporated 1906.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1915. 

Rev. A. M. Benander, President; Rev. Leander Hokenson, 
Secretary; Rev. J. A. Eckstrom, Treasurer; Mr. Ivar Loren, 
Superintendent; Mrs. Ivar I>oren, Matron. 

To protect and aid immigrants and seamen by securing for 
them suitable lodging and proper food, and to minister to their 
spiritual wants. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $2,041 05 

Subscriptions and donations . 3,989 88 

Interest 244 50 

Miscellaneous . . . . 89 55 

Total current receipts . $6,314 98 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 9,510 75 



$15,825 73 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Addition to building 
Telephone, water, and insurance 
Expended through missionary 
Traveling expenses . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$1,941 43 

51 50 

1,744 15 

473 01 



,089 66 
,948 25 
220 32 
326 06 
99 53 
364 60 



$13,258 51 
2,567 22 

$15,825 73 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate' pur- 
poses, $30,211.69. 

MASONIC EDUCATION AND CHARITY TRUST, Masonic Temple, Boston. 
(Incorporated 1884.) 

Report for year ending December 14, 1914. 

Melvin M. Johnson, President; George H. Rhodes, Secretary; 
Edwin B. Holmes, Treasurer. 

Incorporated to hold charity funds. Maintains home for 
Masons in Charlton, Mass. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . . . 



$14 63 
25,985 08 

$25,999 71 

581 17 



$26,580 88 



Cr. 




Clerical work on records . 


$50 00 


Printing ..... 


11 50 


Rent of safe .... 


100 00 


Accrued interest and premium 




on bonds .... 


651 20 


For charity by trustees 


575 00 


To Board of Relief (Grand 




Lodge) .... 


12,134 31 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$13,522 01 

12,284 92 

773 95 

$26,580 88 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



93 



Value of investments held by trustees for benefit of society, 
735.28. 



MASSACHUSETTS BABIES' HOSPITAL, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1915. 

Edward R. Warren, President; Dudley L. Pickman, Jr., Sec- 
retary; Walter Hunnewell, Jr., Treasurer; Mrs. P. G. Terrall, 
General Secretary. 

Assisting and providing for infants medically and socially. 
(No institution.) 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 245; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in 
full, 29; in part, 171; not reimbursed, 45. Monthly average 
number of children under supervision in foster homes, 63. Num- 
ber of placing-out visitors, 3. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Parents . . . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans .... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



$1,000 00 
8,689 50 
1,000 00 
7,801 51 
5,927 84 
342 46 

$24,761 31 
3.000 00 



753 99 



$28,515 30 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent 

Heat, light, and power 
Travel . 
Board of babies 
Boston Dispensary . 
Medical services 
Interest on mortgage 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$7,654 04 

580 65 
687 43 
130 00 
119 74 
490 85 
10,815 24 

4,404 00 
310 50 
550 00 

1,252 13 

$26,994 58 

368 13 

1,152 59 

$28,515 30 



Value of real estate, $20,000; amount of mortgage on sam^? 
$10,000; value of investments, $143,275.96. 



MASSACHUSETTS BAPTIST CHARITABLE SOCIETY, Room 525, Tremont 
Temple, Boston. (Incorporated 1821.) 

Report for year ending October 10, 1915. 

Rev. Harris R. Chamberlin, President; Rev. Charles L. 
Page, Secretary; John F. Barnes, Treasurer. 

To aid widows and children of deceased Baptist ministers of 
Massachusetts. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 61. 



94 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Bequests to income . 
Income from investments . 
Loans and securities matured 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$875 79 

3,300 00 

10,625 95 

19,095 96 

34 25 


$33,931 95 
6,783 83 


$40,715 78 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and oflBce 
supplies .... 

To beneficiaries 



Total current expenses 
New investments 
Cash on hand . 



$375 00 

246 36 
. 10,666 00 

. $11,287 36 

. 22,204 08 

7,224 34 



$40,715 78 



Value of investments, $241,671.14. 



MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY, 233 

Charles St., corner Fruit St., Boston. (Incorporated 1826.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

George B. Shattuck, President; Robert C. Homans, Secretary; 
Henry Parkman, Treasurer. 

Treatment of diseases of the eye and ear of poor persons 
without regard to age, sex, color, nationaUty, or creed; with 
few exceptions, only residents of Massachusetts. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 137 (including 19 at- 
tendant nurses). 

Number aided during year, 3,646; number of free patients 
(excluding public charges), 1,165; total number of hospital days 
during year, 53,002; number of free days (excluding those 
given to public charges), 29,462; number of visits in out-patient 
department, 67,636. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments 

Payments by city, town or State 

Special funds and voluntary 

contributions 
Interest, dividends, and rentals 
Unrestricted legacies 
Bequests to income 
Rebate from State Treasurer . 
Aural surgeon fund 
Social service work 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Sale of securities 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

■year ..... 



$53,139 96 


45,000 00 


955 00 


27,131 45 


22,000 00 


2,950 00 


109 14 


600 00 


960 00 


178 93 


$153,024 48 


13,955 49 


23,465 51 


$190,445 48 



Cr. 



Administration 


. $55,169 03 


Department expenses 


. 80,884 83 


Corporation expenses 


1,006 96 


Social service work 


5,201 08 


Aural surgeon fund 


749 07 


Total current expenses 


. $143,010 97 


Income invested 


18,068 75 


Cash on hand 


. 29,365 76 



$190,445 48 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $563,341.62; value of investments, $584,091.47. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



95 



MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE FIRE SOCIETY, 85 Milk St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1794.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1915. 

Alfred E. Wellington/ President; Courtenay Crocker, Sec- 
retary; James R. Hooper, Treasurer. 

Relief of suffering by fire, and other charitable purposes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 19; and 20 charitable institutions. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . 
Bonds redeemed at par 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$2,389 72 
6,000 00 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and office 



S300 00 





supplies 




16 97 


S8,389 72 


Purchase of bonds . 




6,985 91 




Payments to charitable societies 


1,200 00 


1,970 51 


Tools to mechanics and 


suf- 






ferers by fire 




324 00 




Sundry expenses 

Total current expenses . 




200 65 




$9,027 53 




Cash on hand . 




1.332 70 


$10,360 23 


$10,360 23 



Value of investments, $58,805.13. 



MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE SOCIETY, Boston. (Incorporated 

1794.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1915. 

John A. Hunneman, President; Frederick A. Wellington, Sec- 
retary; G. Glover Crocker, 50 Congress St., Boston, Treasurer. 

The relief of any member of the society and after his decease 
the relief of his widow and children. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 5. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 



$50 00 
7,029 39 



$7,079 39 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 3,523 31 



$10,602 70 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $260 00 
Printing, postage, and office 

supplies . . . . 13 37 

Donations .... 3,600 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 316 65 

Total current expenses . . $4,190 02 

Income invested . . . 5,020 00 

Cash on hand .... 1,392 68 

$10,602 70 



Value of investments, S156,726.63. 



Succeeded by Henry G. Jordan. 



96 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



MASSACHUSETTS CONGREGATIONAL CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 50 
Congress St., Boston. (Incorporated 1736.) 

Report for year ending May 11, 1915. 

Winslow Warren, President; Rev. Edward Hale, Secretary; 
Grenville H. Norcross, Treasurer. 

To aid widows and daughters of deceased Congregational 
(Unitarian and Trinitarian) ministers who have had settle- 
ments in Massachusetts. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 54. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . . $14,237 32 

Investments sold or paid . . 17,299 87 

Total current receipts . . $31,537 19 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . • . . . . 15,373 82 



C». 



Salaries and wages 






f300 00 


Printing, postage. 


and 


office 




supplies 






11 58 


Rent of safe . 






15 00 


To beneficiaries 




. 


13,262 13 



Total current expenses . . $13,588 71 

Investments bought . . 18,915 00 

Accrued interest on investments 153 41 

Cash on hand .... 14,253 89 



$46,911 01 

Value of investments, $300,000. 



$46,911 01 



THE MASSACHUSETTS DIVISION OF THE INTERNATIONAL SUNSHINE 
SOCIETY, 29 Temple PL, Boston. (Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending September 1, 1915. 

Jennie B. Morrill, President; Ellen C. Shepard, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

To incite its members to a performance of kind and helpful 
deeds, and thus to bring the sunshine of happiness into the 
greatest possible number of hearts. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$85 95 
33 80 



$119 75 



Cr. 
Printing, postage, and ofl&ce sup- 
plies . . . . , 
Provision? and supplies 
Miscellaneous . . . . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$89 10 

18 22 

73 

$108 05 
11 70 

$119 75 



MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL, Blossom St., Boston; McLean 
Hospital and Convalescent Hospital, Belmont. (Incorporated 1811.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Henry P. Walcott, M.D., President; John A. Blanchard, Sec- 
retary; Charles H. W. Foster, Treasurer; Frederic A. Wash- 
burn, M.D., Administrator. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



97 



Relief of the sick and injured (except contagious and chronic 
cases); and at Belmont, the McLean Hospital for the care of 
the insane, and Convalescent Hospital. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 770. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 7,745, viz., 3,044 
paying, 915 partly paying, 3,786 free; outside institution, 
158,090. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to in- 
come ..... 
Income from investments 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 

Deficit 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



S559,487 
5.142 


11 
22 


1,771 

175,821 

752 


09 
22 

77 


$742,974 41 
116,780 69 


8,9^0 


12 


§868,695 


22 



Cr. 

Administration expenses . 
Professional care of patients 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex- 
penses 
Interest on notes payable 
Annuities 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$59,829 95 
210.185 60 
333,043 60 

201,032 60 

13,123 17 

4,280 00 

33,839 90 

$855,334 82 
13,360 40 

$868,695 22 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $4,278,491.73; value of investments, $3,605,079.78. 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME FOR INTEMPERATE WOMEN, 2 Binney St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1881.) 

Report for year ending April 1, 1915. 

•Rev. James Reed, President; Mrs. Sarah J. Boyden, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Isabella A. Potter, Treasurer; Mrs. Mabel P. Jones, 
Superintendent. 

The care and reformation of intemperate women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 21. 

Number aided during year, 119, viz., 20 paying, 3 partly paying, 
96 free. 

Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
From laundry . 
Physician to private patients 
New sidewalk . 
Merchandise 
Postage . 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year .... 



$567 53 


3,212 


85 


111 


75 


428 


24 


10,562 


15 


12 00 1 


91 


49 


18 04 1 


3 


68 


6 95 


$15,014 


68 


533 


24 


S15,547 


92 



Cr. 




Salaries and wages . 


$7,178 32 


Printing, postage, and oflBce 




supplies 


115 56 


Provisions and supplies 


2,965 46 


Interest on mortgage 


566 00 


Heat, light, and power 


1,502 83 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


868 89 


Horse shoeing, hay, and grain 


443 31 


Dry goods 


195 24 


General expense 


415 03 


Outside laundry 


169 75 


Miscellaneous . 


497 59 


Total current expenses . 


$14,917 98 


Cash on hand . 


629 94 



$15,547 92 

Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 



poses, $48,753.47; amount of mortgage on same, $11,000; 
of investments, $10,000. 



'alue 



98 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



MASSACHUSETTS HOMOEOPATHIC HOSPITAL, 82 East Concord St,, 
Boston, and Allston St., Brighton. (Incorporated 1855.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Edward H. Mason, President; Talbot Aldrich, Secretary; 
Arthur F. Estabrook, Treasurer; William O. Mann, M.D., 
Superintendent. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 267. 

Number aided during year, 7,391, viz., 1,258 paying, 2,785 
partly paying, 3,348 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to in- 
come .... 
Income from investments 
Income from specific funds 
Sunny Bank Home 
Miscellaneous 

Total ciirrent receipts . 
Deficit .... 



$181,433 75 


1,000 


00 


100 


00 


46,739 


67 


12,575 


44 


2,290 


26 


746 00 1 


$244,885 


12 


11,969 


17 


$256,854 29 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$87,677 76 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies 


3,729 29 


Provisions and supplies . 


111,747 14 


Rent .... 


3,077 22 


Heat, light, and power 


17,508 31 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


14,528 11 


Annuities 


200 00 


Account of special funds . 


3,834 14 


General expenses 


5,505 31 


Permanent improvements 


4,691 92 


Sunny Bank Home 


4,355 09 




$256,854 29 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $419,364.87; value of investments, $1,384,706.42. 



MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, 225 Common- 
wealth Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1871.) 

Report for year ending October 17, 1915. 

Dr. George P. Shattuck, President; Dr. Robert M. Green, 
Secretary; Dr. William L. Richardson, Treasurer. 

Pecuniary assistance to members of the medical profession, 
their widows and children. 

Number aided during year, 21. 

Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Bonds matured 
Cash paid on mortgage 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$403 00 
1,950 00 
2,855 03 
3,000 00 
500 00 


$8,708 03 
2,914 90 


$11,622 93 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and 

supplies 
Annuities 
Miscellaneous . 


office 


$12 50 

4,050 00 

56 GO 


Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 


$4,118 50 
4,838 14 
2,666 29 




$11,622 93 



Value of investments, $66,300. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



99 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY FOR AIDING DISCHARGED PRISONERS, 
24 State House, Boston. (Incorporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Charles Liffler, President; Fred L. Coburn, Secretary; Walter 
B. Waterman, Treasurer; George E. Cornwall, General Agent. 

To advise discharged prisoners, furnish them with aid in the 
nature of board, clothing, tools, and transportation, and assist 
them to procure employment. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 607, all free; also meals and lodg- 
ings furnished to 442. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Income from investments 



$531 14 
3,952 28 



Total current receipts . . S4,483 42 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,079 55 



$4,483 42 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $800 00 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 17 70 

Relief 1,311 30 

Miscellaneous . . . , 35 10 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$2,164 10 

1,877 67 

441 65 

$4,483 42 



Value of investments, $71,808.52. 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO 
ANIMALS, 180 Longwood Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1868.) 

Report for year ending February 28, 1915. 

Dr. Francis H. Rowley, President; Guy Richardson, Secre- 
tary; Eben Shute, Treasurer. 

To prevent cruelty to animals by humane education of the 
ignorant, warning of the thoughtless, and prosecution when 
other means fail. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 43, also 13 part time. 

Employs a collector on commission. 



100 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Bequests .... 

Income from investments 
Sale of publications, etc. . 

Total current receipts . 

From invested funds and cap- 
ital . . 

Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . • . 



$19,443 


85 


57,933 


66 


25,408 


10 


22,991 


43 


$125,777 04 


181.000 00 


10,157 07 


$316,934 


111 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, office sup- 
plies, publication, and tele- 
phone 

Rent 

Traveling expenses, feeding, 
watering, and relief of animals 

Interest .... 

Free dispensary . . 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Angell Memorial building 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$34,261 97 



26,356 53 
3,449 96 

15,013 41 
966 84 
978 23 
419 00 

$81,445 94 

190,223 07 

29,117 50 

16,147 60 

$316,934 11 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $235,000; value of investments, $445,957.12. 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO 
CHILDREN, 43 Mt. Vernon St., Boston. (Incorporated 1878.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Grafton D. Gushing, President; C. C. Carstens, Secretary; 
John H. Sturgis, Treasurer; Edith M. Hotchkiss, Matron. 

To provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to 
children throughout the Commonwealth. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 64. 

Children dealt with without court action (3,613 families repre- 
sented), 9,591; 990 court cases involving 2,825 children; 191 
children in temporary home. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Witness fees . . . . 

Sundries ..... 

Total current receipts 
Excess of expenses . 



$39,070 35 


25,169 


16 


15,695 


85 


^15 


75 


179 


00 


$80,630 11 


5,426 


37 


$86,056 48 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Ofl&ce and traveling expenses 
Interest on mortgage 



$58,041 53 

1,106 06 

25,846 39 

1,062 50 



$86,056 48 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $50,000; amount of mortgage on same, $25,000; value of 
investments, $329,596.21. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



101 



MASSACHUSETTS WOMEN'S HOSPITAL, 53 Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury. 
(Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Mrs. Joseph C. Otis, President; Mrs. Lydia R. Tallman, Sec- 
retary; Mrs. Edna J. Towle, Treasurer; Miss Caroline V. 
Broughton, Matron. 

Hospital for the surgical treatment of abdominal diseases of 
women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 21. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 386; number 
of free patients, 110. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . . . $15,644 69 

Voluntary contributions . . 1,900 43 

Interest, dividends, and rentals 1,930 93 



Total hospital receipts . . $19,476 05 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 777 53 



$20,253 58 



Cr. 
Administration 
General house and property ex 

penses 
Corporation expenses 

Total hospital expenses 
Dispensary expenses 

Total expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$6,775 64 

10,947 61 
194 44 

$17,917 69 
1,562 69 

$19,480 38 
773 20 

$20,253 58 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $36,600; value of investments, $45,487.26. 



THE MAVERICK DISPENSARY OP EAST BOSTON, 18 Chelsea St., East 
Boston. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1915. 

Edwin F. Fobes, President; Ira M. Huggan, Secretary; John 
H. Townsend, Treasurer; Katharine A. Scott, Social Worker. 

To furnish medical aid by daily clinics and by district service, 
both to relieve and to prevent disease among East Boston poor. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6, including 4 part time. 

Number aided during year, 7,189. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Subrentals 

Sale of medical supplies 
Sale of glasses . 
Telephone 



$1,146 27 

2,033 50 

340 25 

92 99 

405 50 

16 10 



Total current receipts . . $4,034 61 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 379 76 



$4,414 37 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $2,670 94 
Printing, postage, and ofl&ce sup- 
plies 174 00 

Medical supplies . . , 214 28 

Rent 600 00 

Heat and light . . . . 127 58 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 94 62 

Laundry . ., . . . 51 55 

Cost of glasses .... 358 29 

Refunds 2 75 

Telephone . . . . 69 80 

Miscellaneous . . . . 5 07 

Total current expenses . . $4,368 88 

Cash on hand . . . . 45 49 

$4,414 37 



102 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



THE MERRIMAC MISSION, INC., 105 and 107 Stamford St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1915. 

Edward I. Aldrich, President; George W. Pitts, Secretary; 
J. T. Mathes, Treasurer; J. A. Fritz, Superintendent. 

Ministering to the spiritual and temporal needs of unfortunate 
men, women, and children, by maintaining reading, recreation, 
lunch, and lodging rooms. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number of meals furnished, 3,101. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $4,676 55 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 140 17 



$4,816 72 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $2,404 92 
Printing, postage, and ofl&ce sup- 
plies 396 00 

Provisions and supplies . . 424 41 

Rent 969 00 

Heat, light, and power . . 390 54 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 10 00 

Miscellaneous .... 147 90 

Total current expenses . . $4,742 77 

Cash on hand . . . . 73 95 



$4,816 72 



METROPOLITAN DENTAL HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION, 140 Fenway, 
Boston. (Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending May, 1915. 

Dr. Julius G. W. Werner, President; Georgina Crosby, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer. 

The performance of acts of dental charity for the benefit of 
the worthy poor. 



Dr. 

Cash on hand at beginning of year . $61 53 



$61 53 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and oflBce supplies $5 00 

Provisions and supplies . , . 6 49 

Miscellaneous . . . . 3 00 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$14 49 
47 04 



$61 53 



MILK AND BABY HYGIENE ASSOCIATION, 296 Boylston St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending February 28, 1915. 

Edward R. Warren, Chairman; Michael M. Davis, Jr., Sec- 
retary; Charles E. Mason, Treasurer; George R. Bedinger, 
Director. 

To improve the general milk supply; to encourage breast 
feeding; to provide milk properly modified for babies who can- 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



103 



not be nursed; to furnish advice and training in hygiene and 
the care of babies. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 17. 

Number aided during year, 4,097, all partly paying. 



Dr. 

•Subscriptions and donations . $22,175 39 

Sale of supplies . . . 558 23 

Advertisements in report . . 407 00 

Sale of milk .... 10,165 41 



Total cvirrent receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



S33,306 03 
379 40 



§33,685 43 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . §19,361 61 

Printing, postage, and telephone 1,941 54 

Rent 326 00 

Heat, light, power, and inci- 
dentals .... 473 63 
Car fare, express, and messenger 

service .... 263 98 

Laundry supplies and equipment 824 30 

Interest 27 50 

Milk 10,192 48 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



533,411 04 
274 39 



S33,685 43 



THE MORGAN MEMORIAL CO-OPERATIVE INDUSTRIES AND STORES, 
INC., 89 Shawmut Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Francis H. Slack, M.D., President; Kate F. Hobart, Secretary; 
Frederick C. Moore, Treasurer; Rev. E. J. Helms, D.D., Super- 
intendent. 

Educating and extending relief to poor and destitute persons; 
improving the dwelling places and living conditions of the poor; 
and giving religious instruction. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 35. 

Number aided during year, 1,675, viz., 1,465 partly paying, 
210 free (480 given legal advice); number of families aided, 577. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions, and donations 


$24,069 41 


Salaries and wages . 


$19,389 13 


Donations for erection of tem- 




Labor and relief 


23,246 37 


perance tower 


12.588 00 


Printing, postage, and office 




Sales from all departments 


52,836 37 


supplies 


1,860 80 


Board, fees, and nominal ac- 




Provisions and supplies . 


14,421 33 


counts .... 


2,835 60 


Rent .... 


883 00 


Miscellaneous 


3,352 83 


Heat, light, and power . 


1,339 49 






Improvements and repairs 


971 85 






Total current receipts . 


§95,682 21 


Purchase of real estate 


4,077 76 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Religious work 


3,920 75 


year ..... 


6,488 06 


Expense of departments . 


13,834 91 






Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 


4,003 98 




$87,949 37 






Cash on hand 


14,220 90 




$102,170 27 


$102,170 27 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $46,728.91; amount of mortgage on same, $1,500; value 
of investments, $33,922.66. 



104 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



THE MOUNT PLEASANT HOME, 59 Elm Hill Ave., Roxbury. (Incor- 
porated 1901.) 

Report for 3^ear ending November 30, 1915. 

William W. Davis, Vice President; Rev. Clarence A. Young, 
Ph.D., Clerk; Fred M. Lamson, Treasurer; Mrs. Lillian Maulsby, 
Superintendent. 

To provide a home for indigent aged persons of both sexes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number aided during year, 44. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Admission fees 
Corporation dues 
From temporary residents 
Sale of investments . 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 11,159 



$9,625 


05 


1,423 


10 


1,500 


00 


259 


00 


1,389 


33 


851 


25 


27 


43 


$15,075 


16 


11,159 


41 


$26,234 


57 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$4,282 63 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies 




841 72 


Provisions arid supplies 


. 


4,588 46 


Heat, light, and power 




1,848 50 


Furnishings and incidental 


re- 




pairs .... 




1,270 94 


Insurance 




659 50 


Physicians, nurses, and medicine 


1,571 71 


Burials .... 




185 00 


Supplies for residents 




232 17 


Expens.^s on real estate 


. 


156 65 


On 1916 income 


. 


31 81 


Miscellaneous , 




162 87 


Total current expenses . 


$15,831 96 


Cash on hand . 




10,402 61 




J26,234 57 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $76,834.47; value of investments, $45,603.87. 



MT. SINAI HOSPITAL SOCIETY OF BOSTON, 17 Staniford St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Lehman Pickert, President; Philip Rubenstein, Secretary; 
Lucius J. Barnet, Treasurer; S. A. Moulton, M.D., Superin- 
tendent. 

Medical and surgical aid and nursing through its dispensary 
to sick or disabled persons of any creed or nationality. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 5,566, viz., 3,711 
partly paying, 1,855 free; outside institution, 196, all free; 
number of families aided, 177. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



105 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
From Federated Jewish Charities 
Dispensary receipts . 
Interest ..... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$1,638 00 

7,300 00 

4,815 89 

5 42 


$13,759 31 
185 48 


$13,944 79 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


. $6,463 15 


Printing, postage, and 


office 


supplies 


245 10 


Supplies . 


2,990 82 


Rent 


960 00 


Heat and light 


420 97 


Tuberculosis . 


. 1,140 24 


General expense 


. 1,499 72 


Total current expenses 


. $13,720 00 


Cash on hand . 


224 79 




$13,944 79 



NATIONAL CO-OPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL RELIEF ASSOCIATION, 31- 
33 Corning St., Boston. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

George E. Henry, President; Fred C. Moore, Secretary; David 
Dunbar, Treasurer; Rev. Edgar J. Helms, Superintendent. 

To superintend and encourage the establishment in various 
cities of branch industrial relief associations for the religious, 
educational, and industrial welfare of the poor. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,221 19 

Sale of real estate . . . 3,489 19 

Miscellaneous .... 12 87 

On mortgage loan . . . 15,000 00 

Total current receipts . . $19,723 82 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,669 63 



$21,393 45 



Cr. 

On building contracts 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$21,297 07 

62 50 

$21,630 57 

33 38 



$21,393 45 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $100,000; value of investments, $40,000. 



THE NEEDLEWOMAN'S FRIEND SOCIETY, 149 Tremont St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1851.) 

Report for year ending April 14, 1915. 

Mrs. WilHam M. Conant, President; Mrs. J. B. Tiernay, 
Secretary; Bernard C. Weld, Treasurer; Mrs. C. E. Pike, Super- 
intendent. 

To give employment, with adequate compensation, to in- 
digent needlewomen. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, about 90. 



106 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $121 50 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,075 00 

Income from investments . . 2,273 01 

Income from sales . . . 4,464 94 



$8,934 45 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,404 35 



$10,338 80 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


. $1,411 50 


Printing, postage, and office 


supplies 


44 01 


Materials 


1,991 64 


Rent .... 


650 00 


Light .... 


8 01 


Paid to sewing women 


3,786 36 


Telephone 


42 50 


Auditor .... 


25 00 


Insvu-ance 


12 00 


Miscellaneous . 


133 85 


Total current expenses . 


. $8,104 87 


Cash on hand . 


. 2,233 93 




$10,338 80 



Value of investments, $45,350. 



NEW ENGLAND BAPTIST HOSPITAL, Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Edward H. Haskell, President; J. L. Harbour, Secretary; 
Vernon A. Field, Treasurer; Emma A. Anderson, Superintendent. 

Medical and surgical treatment of patients; gratuitous care 
given to the sick poor. No contagious, mental, or chronic cases 
are admitted. No restrictions as to age, sex, color, nationality, 
creed, or residence. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 51. 

Number aided during year, 674, viz., 556 paying, 27 partly 
paying, 91 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Sale medical supplies 
Nurses' services 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$44,532 29 
1,648 98 
1,153 52 
3,454 11 
1,258 45 
366 47 


$52,413 82 
2,545 28 


$54,959 10 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$11,876 43 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies 


933 22 


Provisions and supplies 


14,182 66 


Heat, light, and power 


3,241 38 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


4,249 69 


Laimdry .... 


1,351 70 


Medical suppUes 


2,000 67 


Taxes .... 


112 00 


Mortgage paid 


3,300 00 


Miscellaneous . 


1,569 49 


Total current expenses . 


$42,817 24 


Income invested 


9,362 50 


Cash on hand . 


2,779 36 




$54,959 10 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $50,000; value of investments $23,000. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



107 



NEW ENGLAND DEACONESS ASSOCIATION, Home, 691 and 693 Mas- 
sachusetts Ave., Boston; Hospital, 175 Bellevue St., Longwood; Fresh 
Air Home, Haverhill; Hospital, Concord; Home for the Aged, Concord; 
general office, 112 Water St., Boston. (Incorporated 1889 and 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Rev. Willard T. Perrin, President; Mrs. Emma H. Watkins, 
Clerk; C. H. J. Kimball, Treasurer; Theodore A. Hildreth, Cor- 
responding Secretary. 

Hospital service, district medical attendance and nursing, 
general philanthropic and relief work, fresh air work and country 
rest home, training of deaconesses and social workers. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 136. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 1,419, viz., 1,129 
paying, 132 partly paying, 158 free; outside institution, 2,729. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 



$75,490 25 

11,347 04 

2,665 36 

819 26 



$90,321 91 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 
supplies 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat, light, power, and water 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Interest and insurance 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Deficit January 1, 1914 
Cash on hand . 



$30,891 22 

2,361 64 

31,035 18 

528 00 

8,433 48 

3.094 39 
3,016 13 
6,358 90 

$85,718 94 

3,981 14 

621 83 

$90,321 91 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $366,520.50; mortgage on same, $59,300; value of in- 
vestments, $64,718.07. 



NEW ENGLAND HOME FOR LITTLE WANDERERS, 161 South Hunting- 
ton Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1865.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Arthur S. Johnson, President; Frederic D. Fuller, Secretary; 
Samuel D. Parker, Treasurer; Frederic H. Knight, Ph.D., Super- 
intendent. 

To care for homeless and destitute children from all parts of 
New England who are not mentally or physically defective, 
without regard to color, race, sex, or religion. Usually not re- 
ceived until able to walk nor after they are twelve years of age 
(boys and girls). 



108 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers or employees, 44. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 483; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in 
full, 59; in part, 72; not reimbursed, 352; monthly average 
number of children under supervision in foster homes, 417. 
Number of placing-out visitors, 11. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $16,959 95 
Annuities and bequests to in- 
come 273,108 96 

Income from investments . 41,161 93 

Notes negotiated . . . 25,000 00 

Bank tax refunded . . . 376 36 

Sale of securities . , . 12,631 25 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 



$369,238 45 
13,051 53 



$382,289 98 



Cr. 



and office 



Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies . 
Heat, light, and power . 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Traveling 
Telephone 

Insiu-ance, interest, and taxes 
New construction . 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$25,938 34 

2,461 24 

16,479 35 

2,492 59 

431 20 
3.106 18 

366 84 

4,292 50 

66,796 85 

2,867 23 

$125,232 32 

235,934 50 

21,123 16 

$382,289 98 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $144,000; value of investments, $1,003,680. 



NEW ENGLAND HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN, Dimock St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1863.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Miss Helen F. Kimball, President; Mrs. Alice B. Crosby, Sec- 
retary; George A. Goddard, Treasurer; Stella M. Taylor, M.D., 
Superintendent. 

To provide for women medical aid of competent physicians 
of their own sex. Has a training school for nurses. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 95. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,529; number 
of free patients (excluding public charges), 400; total number of 
hospital days during year, 33,346; number of free days (exclud- 
ing those given to public charges), 12,167; total number of 
visits in out-patient department during year, 14,161. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



109 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Persons aided 
Dispensary receipts 
Bequests 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Sale of securities 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$1,954 


13 


35,436 


25 


38,203 


11 


4,652 


74 


30,646 64 1 


567 


91 


$111,460 


78 


46,370 30 1 


2,387 


18 


$160,218 26 1 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 

suppUes 
Provisions and supplies 
Drugs and medicines 
Taxes, etc. 

Heat, light, and power 
Repairs 

Dispensary expenses 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$36,223 42 

1,174 45 
28,101 68 
5,274 83 
1,727 46 
6,823 37 
7,682 73 
7,746 40 
2,895 22 



$97,649 56 

59,705 41 

2,863 29 

$160,218 26 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $389,100; value of investments, $778,422.58. 



NEW ENGLAND KURN HATTIN HOMES, Boston. (Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

George W. Coleman, President; Arthur J. Crockett, Secretary; 
George B. Graff, 294 Washington Street, Boston, Treasurer. 

Aiding in the maintenance of homeless and neglected boys in 
the Kurn Hattin Homes, located in Westminster and Saxton's 
River, Vermont. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $2,648 87 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 14 44 



$2,663 31 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies . . . . . 
Kurn Hattin Homes for supplies . 
Miscellaneous . . . . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$882 78 

76 70 

1,685 50 

9 00 

$2,653 98 

9 33 

$2,663 31 



NEW ENGLAND MORAL REFORM SOCIETY (Talitha Cumi Home), 
215 Forest Hills St., Jamaica Plain. (Incorporated 1846.) 

. ■ Report for year ending March 1, 1915. 

Dr. Caroline E. Hastings, President; Dr. Julia M. Plummer, 
Secretary; Mrs. Arthur Perry, Jr., Treasurer J 

Home and hospital for unmarried girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 17. 

Number aided during year, 119, viz., 26 paying, 63 partly 
paying, 30 free. 



no 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 




Cr. 




Board and attendance 


$2,543 21 


Salaries and wages . 


$8,439 99 


Subscriptions and donations 


8,660 80 


Printing, postage, and oflBce 


Income from investments . 


2,597 64 


supplies 


573 95 


Annual sale, entertainment, etc. 


2,537 59 


Provisions and supplies 


4,202 91 


Loan from investment fund 


1,400 00 


Water rates 


157 50 






Heat, light, and power 


2.489 13 






Total current receipts . 


$17,739 24 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




Cash on hand at beginning of 




pairs .... 


1,068 52 


year 


350 80 


Telephone 


138 19 






Insurance 


127 00 






Traveling expense of visitor 


140 74 






Express and car fares 


64 53 






Advertising 


187 79 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


40 06 




$17,630 31 






Cash on hand . 


459 73 




$18,090 04 


$18,090 04 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $88,123; value of investments, $51,100.53. 



NEW ENGLAND PEABODY HOME FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN, Hale St., 
Hyde Park. (Incorporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Mrs. Herbert A. Joslin, President; Mrs. Albion S. Whitmore, 
Secretary; Mrs. Edward B. Kellogg, Treasurer; Clara M. 
Thurston, Superintendent. 

Home for destitute, crippled, and deformed children under 
twelve years of age; nonsectarian (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number aided during year, 43, viz., 3 partly paying, 40 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments , 
Fairs and entertainments , 

Total ciurent receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



$168 50 
1,143 00 
8,912 32 
3,020 00 
2,950 00 


$16,193 82 
2,000 00 

961 49 


$19,155 31 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, advertising, postage, 

and office supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and school supplies 
Medicine and surgical supplies 
Transportation and express 
Water tax and work on trees 
Telephone 
Elevator, fire escape, and repairs 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$5,661 57 



840 88 
,380 66 
986 77 
,253 50 
,185 85 
219 14 
182 80 
78 71 
,177 68 



$18,967 56 
187 75 

$19,155 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $39,000; value of investments, $82,350. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Ill 



NEWSBOYS' READING ROOM ASSOCIATION, 7 Green St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1879.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1915. 

Clement S. Houghton, President; Frank C. Brewer, Secretary; 
B. Preston Clark, Treasurer; H. W. Plaisted, Superintendent. 
To establish a reading room for newsboys. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 
Number aided during year, 600. 



Dr 

From beneficiaries . . . $81 30 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,090 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 1,000 00 

Income from investments . . 423 01 

Rent of room . . 183 00 

Total current receipts . $2,777 31 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 57 55 



$2,834 86 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, repairs, and 
supplies .... 

Rent 

Light 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$1,026 00 

64 45 

1,200 00 

76 35 

$2,366 80 

468 06 

$2,834 86 



Value of investments, $9,896.58. 



NICKERSON HOME FOR CHILDREN, 125 Townsend St., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1850.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. Kate M. Nickerson, President; Mrs. Garafelia M. Daw- 
son, Secretary; Howell F. Wilson, Treasurer; Mrs. Lola C. 
Holway, Superintendent. 

Home for destitute children under fourteen years of age, from 
every part of New England, especially half orphans (boys and 
girls) . 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 72, viz., 34 paying, 17 partly pay- 
ing, 21 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From fair .... 
From telephone 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$2,181 00 


1,050 00 


481 


81 


550 


26 


1 


10 


$4,264 


17 


229 


81 


$4,493 98 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




$1,193 69 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




plies .... 




115 20 


Provisions and supplies 


. 


1,621 52 


Heat, light, and power 




323 18 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


56 11 


Clothing and supplies 


, 


302 02 


Water and gypsy moth work 




25 96 


Total current expenses . 


$3,637 68 


Cash on hand . 


• 


856 30 




$4,493 98 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $13,000; value of investments, $12,662.83. 



112 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



NORFOLK HOUSE CENTRE (formerly THE SOUTH END INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL), 14 John Eliot Sq., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1884.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Charles L. DeNormandie, President; Miss Margaret W. 
Thacher, Secretary; William H. Varney, Treasurer; Mrs. Amelia 
R. Damon, Superintendent. 

To give industrial training and social opportunities to young 
people and adults in Roxbury district. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 27. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Rents .... 
Invested fund . 
C. A. Newhall, balance of ac- 
count .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



$180 33 


4,561 


65 


9,664 


75 


1,902 


29 


1,418 


38 


140 


95 


111 


63 


66 


58 


$18,046 56 1 


5,000 


00 


743 52 


$23,790 08 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$2,810 27 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies 


390 62 


Provisions and supplies 


430 38 


City and water taxes 


373 77 


Heat, light, and power 


1,474 68 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


813 28 


Insurance 


1,555 90 


Telephone 


177 07 


Advertising 


28 35 


Interest .... 


280 55 


Improvements of Norfolk House 


12,282 66 


Improvements, Bartlett St. 


1,167 54 


Miscellaneous . 


131 42 


Total current expenses . 


$21,916 49 


Income invested 


1,305 46 


Cash on hand . 


568 13 




$23,790 08 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $31,736; value of investments, $113,309.15. 



NORTH BENNET STREET INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, 39 North Bennet St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1885.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Quincy A. Shaw, President; Francis W. Hunnewell, 2d, 
Secretary; Russell G. Fessenden, Treasurer; George C. Greener, 
Director. 

Social and educational improvement; research and experiment 
in educational and social methods. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 28. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



113 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$396 76 


Salaries and wages . 


$21,886 54 


Subscriptions and donations . 26,968 96 


Equipment 


649 89 


Income from investments 


549 05 


Provisions and supplies 


2,827 62 


City of Boston 


3,160 00 


Interest on notes 


500 00 


Day nursery . 


103 20 


Heat, light, and power 


2.028 38 


Department receipts 


. 1,585 66 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




Telephone 


47 53 


pairs .... 


295 69 


Rent of cottages 


383 00 


Water .... 


297 00 


Miscellaneous . 


13 00 


Telephone 


355 96 






Social service house, repairs, etc 


338 61 






Total current receipts 


. $33,207 16 


Part payment of loan 


1,000 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of 


Interest on loan 


149 29 




. 1.074 97 






year 








Total current expenses . 


$30,328 98 






Cash on hand . 


3,953 15 




$34,282 13 


$34,282 13 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $80,600; valile of investments, $15,844.33. 



NORTH END DIET KITCHEN, 8 Staniford PL, Boston. (Incorporated 

1890.) 

Report for year ending December 31. 1914. 

Dr. Malcolm Storer, President; Miss Marion Allen, Secre- 
tary; Alfred D. Foster, Treasurer; Mrs. Eloise J. Spencer, 
Matron. 

To provide, free of expense, such diet and food for sick per- 
sons as may be directed by the physicians of the dispensaries 
of Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 391, viz., 75 paying, 316 free; 
families aided, 283. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $935 11 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,783 75 

Income from investments . . 1,345 15 

Sale of rights . . . . 49 37 

Total current receipts . . $4.113 38 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,472 75 



$5,586 13 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage, and office sup 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent 

Heat, light, and power 
Rent, safe deposit box 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$531 69 

27 99 

4.055 98 

276 00 



10 00 


9 


00 


$4,971 


32 


280 00 


334 


81 



$5,586 13 



Value of investments, $27,890. 



114 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



NORWEGIAN MISSION HOME, 56 Cedar St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 

1912.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Rev. O. M. Jonswold, President; O. Hoff, Secretary; Oscar 
Levine, Treasurer; Miss Augusta Isaksen, Matron. 

Home for Scandinavian men and women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 312, viz., 280 paying, 11 partly 
paying, 21 free. 



Dt. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,733 26 

Subscriptions and donations . 141 99 

Total current receipts . . $1,875 25 

Loans to income . . . 136 25 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 114 41 



$2,125 91 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . , $144 10 
Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies 5 03 

Provisions and supplies . , 1,240 23 

Laundry . . . . . 32 55 

Heat, light, and pow er . . 191 91 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 124 25 

Loan repaid . . . . 35 00 

Water rate . . . . 31 50 

Interest on mortgage . . . 191 25 

Miscellaneous . . . , 22 34 

Total current expenses . . $2,018 16 

Cash on hand . . . , 107 75 

$2,125 91 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $10,500; amount of mortgage on same, $10,311. 



OLIVER DITSON SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF OF NEEDY MUSICIANS, 
Boston. (Incorporated 1889.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1915. 

Arthur Foote, President; Charles F. Smith, Secretary; Arthur 
R. Smith, Assistant Treasurer. 

Rehef of sick, disabled and needy musicians. 
Number aided during year, 33. 



Dr. 

Interest on mortgage notes and 

bank balance . . . $1,577 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 407 43 



$1,985 19 



Cr, 

Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies $25 50 

To beneficiaries . . . 1,920 00 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,945 50 
39 69 

$1,985 19 



Value of investments, $34,000. 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



115 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR OF THE TOWN OF BOSTON IN THE PROV- 
INCE OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY IN NEW ENGLAND, 43 Hawkins 
St., Boston. (Incorporated 1772.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1915. 

William P. Fowler, Chairman and Treasurer; William H. 
Hardy, Secretary. 

Care and distribution of certain trust funds held for various 
charitable purposes. 

Number aided during year, 307. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . $27,356 61 

Rents 4,050 87 

Notes expired . . . 115.000 00 

Refvmd of pensions . . 75 00 

Total current receipts . . $146,482 48 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 8,580 75 



$155,063 23 



Cr. 
Salaries of chaplains 
Taxes . 

Repairs, insurance, etc. 
Fuel 

Food . 
Pensions 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$219 66 

75 95 

881 13 

992 43 

87 02 

24,940 00 

$27,196 19 

116,220 00 

11,647 04 

$155,063 23 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $45,766.32; value of investments, $674,213.36. 



PETER BENT BRIGHAM HOSPITAL, corner Huntington Ave. and Francis 
St., Boston. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending May 24, 1915. 

Charles P. Curtis, President; Laurence H. H. Johnson, Secretary; 
Edmund D. Codman, Treasurer; Dr. H. B. Howard, Superintendent. 

Hospital for the sick poor in the county of Suffolk. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 117. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 3,156, viz., 1,346 
paying, 758 partly paying, 1,052 free; outside institution, 8,651. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Income from investments 

Total current receipts . 
To income from principal 



$76,289 93 
201,849 70 



$278,139 63 
7,044 07 



$285,183 70 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$142,066 61 


Printing, postage, and 


office 




supplies 




7,712 54 


Provisions and supplies 




72,432 84 


Heat, light, and power 




30,000 00 


Fiurnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . 




16,822 77 


Insurance 




894 10 


Legal expenses 




785 25 


Miscellaneous 




576 11 


Total current expenses 


$271,290 22 


Cash on hand 




13.893 48 




$285,183 70 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $1,745,145.54; value of investments, $6,602,788.36. 



116 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



PREACHERS' AID SOCIETY OF THE NEW ENGLAND ANNUAL CON- 
FERENCE OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 93 Milk St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1858.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Everett O. Fisk, President; John L. Harvey, Secretary; Arthur 
E. Dennis, Treasurer. 

Caring for worn-out Methodist preachers, their widows and 
children. 

Number of famiUes aided, 80. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . S5,9o9 74 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 19 32 



Accrued interest on bonds pur- 
chased . . . . . 

Paid to beneficiaries through J. 

M. Leonard . . . . 

Expenses . . . . . 

Total current expenses 

Cash on hand . . . . 



$5,979 06 

Value of investments, $119,370.05. 



$472 75 

4,797 66 
133 17 

$5,403 58 
575 48 

$5,979 06 



ROBERT B. BRIGHAM HOSPITAL FOR INCURABLES, Parker Hill Ave., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

John H. Gibbs, President; Samuel A. Merrill, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Mary E. L. Thrasher, R.N., Superintendent. 

Medical and surgical treatment of citizens of Boston incapable 
of obtaining a comfortable livelihood by reason of chronic or 
incurable disease. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 110. 

Number aided during year, 136, all free. 



Dr. 
Bequests to income 
Income from investments 

Total cvu-rent receipts . 
Securities .... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$38,889 26 
1,867 90 

$40,759 16 
111,804 50 

61,772 96 



$214,334 62 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and oflBce 

supphes 
Provisions and supphes . 
Rent .... 
Heat, Ught, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Medicine and hospital supplies 
Water .... 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Equipment 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$45,345 71 

1,003 64 

16,863 31 

600 00 

8,134 15 

2,254 24 

4,975 26 

870 00 

5,560 01 

$85,606 32 

12,937 37 

111,804 50 

3,986 43 

$214,334 62 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $792,000; value of investments, $1,697,333.22. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



117 



THE ROBERT GOULD SHAW HOUSE, INC., 6 Hammond St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1908.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Rev. Frederick B. Allen, President; Rev. Charles E. Park, 
Secretary; Harold Peabody, Treasurer; Miss Marion Doolittle, 
Head Worker. 

To promote the social and moral welfare of the negroes of 
Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number aided during year, 450. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $4,885 88 

Miscellaneous . . . . 40 33 

Total current receipts . . $4,926 21 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 48 46 



$4,974 67 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$2,297 13 


Printing, postage, and oflfice sup- 




plies . . . . . 


38 50 


Rent 


600 00 


Heat, light, and power 


301 61 


Clubs, classes, and teachers 


436 10 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


691 78 


Total current expenses 


$4,365 12 


Cash on hand . . . . 


609 55 




$4,974 67 



THE ROBERT TREAT PAINE ASSOCIATION, 16 State St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Rev. George L. Paine, President; John H. Storer, Clerk; 
Robert Treat Paine, Treasurer. 

Distributes net income to charitable organizations. 
Number of paid employees, 3. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . 
Sale of range, boiler, and sink 
Fire insurance .... 

Total current receipts 
Overpaid balance 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$7,179 18 

22 00 

953 00 


$8,154 18 

264 95 

79 92 


$8,499 05 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$450 00 


Heat, Ught, and water 


819 57 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


823 32 


Repairs and alterations 


1,620 70 


Taxes 


1,326 50 


Care of real estate 


194 07 


Insurance ..... 


684 89 


Charity 


2,570 00 


Miscellaneous .... 


10 00 




$8,499 05 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $30,400; value of investments, $72,044. 



118 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



ROXBURY BOYS' CLUB AND INSTITUTE OF INDUSTRY, 80 Dudley 
St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1885.) 

Report for year ending June 1, 1915. 

Walter Ballantyne, President; J. Gilbert Peirce, Secretary; 
Burton R. Miller, Treasurer; J. A. Stewart, Superintendent. 

Training street boys and girls, with class rooms for work in 
many industries^ club rooms, gymnasium, and library. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Mortgage .... 

Rent ..... 
Insurance premium , 
Special campaign funds 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash, on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$73 47 

3,966 00 

29,000 00 

811 92 

72 82 

13,064 09 

68 32 


$47,056 62 
184 56 


$47,241 18 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 
supplies 

Supplies .... 

Rent .... 

Heat, light, power, and water 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . 

Insurance 

To contractor 

To architect 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



S2,664 47 

336 44 

40 37 

990 00 

353 54 

50 05 

418 39 

39,485 09 

2,000 00 

729 01 

$47,067 36 
173 82 

$47,241 18 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $75,000; amount of mortgage on same, $30,000. 



ROXBURY CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 106 Roxbury St., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1799.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

James DeNormandie, D.D., President; Albert E. Carr, Sec- 
retary; Charles L. DeNormandie, Treasurer; Harold K. Esta- 
brook. General Agent. 

To assist the poor of Roxbury. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 524; number of families aided, 109. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



119 



Dr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


S96S 34 


Income from investments . 


2,802 49 


Trustees Davis fund 


4,090 37 


Legacy 


1,000 00 


Miscellaneous . 


69 05 


Total current receipts . 


S8,930 25 


Sale of invested funds 


7,475 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




year 


3,293 15 



SI 9,698 40 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Charity .... 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Telephone 
Insurance 
Janitor service . 
Interest on bonds purchased 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Investments 
Cash on hand . 



S3,325 99 


154 


82 


2,747 


10 


91 


63 


13 


50 


90 94 


40 33 


66 


91 


54 


17 


322 


42 



$6,907 81 

11,026 37 

1,764 22 

$19,698 40 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $12,775.63; value of investments, $169,280.48. 

ROXBURY FEMALE BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, Putnam Chapel, Putnam 
St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1881.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Lucy P. Hayden, President; Helen S. Rogers, Secretary; 
Charles L. DeNormandie, Treasurer. 

To aid needy women of Roxbury with material for sewing and 
in other charitable ways. 

Number of families aided, 30. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . 
Income from investments 
Sales of garments 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



S30 00 
416 27 
120 18 

$566 45 
187 50 



$753 95 



Cr. 

Work materials and cash relief 
Loan to beneficiary 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Income invested . 
Cash on hand 



$671 51 

15 00 

30 

$686 81 
26 20 
40 94 

$753 95 



Value of investments, $9,126.20. 



ROXBURY HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 3 Burton Ave., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1856.) 

Eeport for j-ear ending March 31, 1915. 

Martin L. Gate, President; Miss Mary S. Parker, Secretary; 
Charles L. DeNormandie, Treasurer; Miss Harriet E. Richards, 
Superintendent. 

Home for Protestant American women, natives or long-time 
residents of Roxbury, and not less than sixty-five years of age. 
Admission fee, $300. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 



120 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Number aided during year: 


in institution, 29; 


outside in- 


stitution, 3. 










Dr. 




Cr. 






From beneficiaries . 


$444 00 


Salaries and wages . 


. 


$3,631 56 


Subscriptions and donations 


3,694 06 


Printing, postage, and office 




Income from investments . 


8,945 70 


supplies 
Provisions and supplies 




89 80 
2,856 78 






Total current receipts . 


$13,083 76 


Outside beneficiaries 




541 86 


On account of principal (bonds 




Heat, light, and water 




802 05 


matured, etc.) 


9,305 00 


Furnishings and incidental 


re- 




Cash on hand at beginning of 




pairs .... 




895 02 


year ..... 


892 17 


Insurance 

Medical expense 

Funeral expense 

Repairs on outside property 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 




247 20 
223 51 
167 50 
123 71 
591 51 




$10,170 50 






Income invested 




10,487 50 






Cash on hand . 




2,622 93 




$23,280 93 


$23,280 93 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $28,000; value of investments, $179,905.63. 



ROXBURY LADIES' AID AND FUEL SOCIETY, Fauntleroy Hall, 
Wenonah St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending May, 1915. 

Mrs. M. Levin, President; Mrs. L. E. Laskey, Secretary; Mrs. 
H. Frank, Treasurer. 

The immediate relief of destitute Hebrew people. 
Employs a collector on commission. 
Number aided during year, 989. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Reserve fund 

Ball . 

Dues 

Whists 

Refunds . 

Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$44 00 


800 00 


2,668 01 


1,755 00 


1,083 09 


101 00 


67 83 


$6,518 93 


570 00 


387 59 


$7,476 52 



Cr. 

To collector .... $273 73 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 203 55 

Rent 55 10 

Charity 5,525 57 

Loans paid . . . . 370 00 

"Happy day" expenses . • 41 39 

Miscellaneous . . . . 78 59 

Total current expenses . . $6,547 93 

Reserve fund .... 800 00 

" Happy day " fund . . . 50 00 

Cash on hand .... 78 59 

$7,476 52 



ROXBURY NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 858 Albany St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1915. 

Martin L. Gate, President; Mrs. Donald Gregg, Secretary; 
A. Winsor Weld, Treasurer; Miss Ethel Ward Dougherty, Head 
Resident. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



121 



A social and recreational center for the residents of the neigh- 
borhood. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 27. 
Number using house privileges, 2,078. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous . 



$266 47 

11,697 40 

360 67 



$12,324 54 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$8,326 35 


Printing, postage, and oflBce 




supplies 




100 15 


Heat, light, and power 




1,256 73 


Furnishings and incidental 


re- 




pairs .... 




1,048 61 


Camp .... 




749 66 


Telephone 




169 13 


Overdraft paid 




135 62 


Miscellaneous . 




519 40 


Total current expenses . 


$12,305 65 


Cash on hand at end of year 




18 89 




$12,324 54 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $46,000. 



THE RUGGLES STREET NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE, 147 Ruggles St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1915. 

Mrs. Pauline A. Shaw, President; Miss Adelene Moffat, Acting 
Treasurer; Mrs. Clara G. Sale, Secretary and Head Worker. 

Clubs and classes for the social and civic welfare of the 
neighborhood. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 20. 

Number aided during year, 390. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Refunds .... 



$193 32 

7,338 96 

191 07 



$7,723 35 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$5,821 48 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies ..... 


82 12 


Provisions and supplies 


26 01 


Heat, light, and power 


402 95 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


125 56 


Car fares ..... 


31 21 


Boston Social Union fee 


49 00 


Repairs ..... 


461 57 


Camp, outing, playground, and 




gardens .... 


246 12 


Classes, clubs, and entertainments 


376 95 


Telephone .... 


100 13 


Miscellaneous .... 


25 




$7,723 35 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $13,300. 



122 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



ST. ELIZABETH'S HOSPITAL OF BOSTON, 736 Cambridge St., Brighton. 
(Incorporated 1872.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President and Treasurer; 
John Attridge, Secretary; Dr. John R. Slattery, Superintendent. 

To care for the sick, without regard to age, sex, color, nation- 
ality, creed, or residence (excluding contagious, acute venereal, 
and mental diseases). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 94. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 1,271, viz., 397 
paying, 643 partly paying, 231 free; outside institution, 10,076. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous contributions 
Income from investments 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
3'ear 



$31,269 03 

286,453 13 

3,629 38 

$321,351 54 

75,334 38 



$396,685 92 



Cr. 




Salaries and wages . 


$11,071 30 


Provisions and supplies- . 


15,376 13 


Rent .... 


200 00 


Heat, light, and power 


6,395 46 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


225 00 


Insurance 


1,250 76 


Taxes 


1,265 53 


Interest 


1,019 24 


Purchase of property, etc. 


156,294 47 


Miscellaneous 


3,230 83 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$196,328 72 

49,386 80 

150,970 40 

$396,685 92 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $270,915.70; amount of mortgage on same, $25,481.25; 
value of investments, $49,386.80. 



ST. JOSEPH'S HOME, 43 East Brookline St., Boston. (Incorporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President and Treasurer; 
Right Rev. Mgr. James P. E. O'Connell, Secretary; Sister Mary 
Boniface, Superior. 

For unemployed women and immigrant girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Number aided during year, 1,200, viz., 1,079 paying, 50 partly 
paying, 71 free. 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



123 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Board .... 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$22 

141 

7,444 


20 
25 
07 


$7,607 
7,799 


52 
81 


$15,407 


33 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$1,586 10 


Printing, postage, and 


office 




supphes 




100 36 


Provisions and supplies 




3,107 91 


Heat, light, and power 




668 77 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . 




876 79 


Renovation of plant 




8,356 81 


Miscellaneous . 




342 39 


Total current expenses 


$15,039 13 


Cash on hand . 


• 


368 20 




$15,407 33 



ST. LUKE'S HOME FOR CONVALESCENTS, 149 Roxbury St., Roxbury. 
(Incorporated 1872.) 

Report for year ending October 17, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, President; Charles E. Mason, 
Secretary; William H. Aspinwall, Treasurer; Miss H. O. Coombs, 
Matron, 

A convalescent home for women, without distinction as to age, 
creed, or nationality. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 18. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 364; outside in- 
stitution, 43 ; all free. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

rebate national bank tax 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Overdraft 



$4,450 55 


7,541 


14 


14 


55 


37 


10 


$12,043 34 


1,635 


47 i 


$13,678 81 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$4,626 12 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies . . . . 


137 68 


Provisions and supplies 


4,002 21 


Heat, light, and power 


874 24 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


604 16 


Improvements 


1,625 28 


Outside relief expense 


1,063 00 


Special Christmas donation 


25 00 


Miscellaneous .... 


721 12 




$13,678 81 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $27,819.50; value of investments, $179,189.45. 



ST. MARY'S INFANT ASYLUM AND LYING-IN HOSPITAL, Everett Ave., 
Dorchester. (Incorporated 1874.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Patrick F. 
McDonald, Secretary; Edward J. O'Neil, Treasurer; Sister 
Veronica, Sister Superior. 



124 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



The care of homeless and neglected children under three years 
of age, and for all the purposes of a lying-in hospital. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 60 (including 48 pupil 
nurses). 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends, and rentals . 
Unrestricted legacies 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$43,352 81 


10,619 


69 


11 


29 


7,590 


66 


$61,574 45 


3,864 


34 


$65,438 79 



Cr, 

Administration 

General house and property ex- 
penses, including care of chil- 
dren at board 

Total hospital expenses . 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$7,594 63 



54,914 47 



$62,509 10 
2,929 69 



$65,438 79 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $127,800; amount of mortgage on same, $15,000. 



ST. STEPHEN'S SETTLEMENT, TRUSTEES OF, 70 State St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Harry Burnett, President; Thomas P. Beal, Jr., Secretary; 
George L. Benedict, Treasurer; Miss Abigail C. Hitchcock, 
Superintendent of Welcome House, 9 Florence St. 

To hold title to real estate and funds for the benefit of mission 
work carried on by St. Stephen's Church on Florence St., Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 



Dr. 



Cash on hand (Welcome House) 


$894 98 


Salaries and wages . 


$3,183 60 


Income from investments . 


206 99 


Printing, postage, and office 




Receipts of Welcome House 


8,452 45 


supplies .... 


199 14 






Provisions and supplies 


2,156 55 






Total current receipts . 


$9,554 42 


Insurance .... 


63 04 


Cash on hand .... 


607 47 


Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 


967 55 






pairs ..... 


783 95 






Expenses for girls and house 


403 22 






Medical expenses 


366 46 






Telephone .... 


142 32 






Water rates .... 


45 00 






Miscellaneous (Welcome House) 


30 06 






Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


205 64 




SS,546 53 






Cash on hand (Welcome House) 


1,006 54 






Cash on hand .... 


60S 82 



$10,161 89 



Cr. 



$10,161 89 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $31,431.94; value of investments, $21,179.09. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



125 



ST. VINCENT'S ORPHAN ASYLUM, Camden St. and Shawmut Ave., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1834.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Thomas F. 
Harrington, M.D., Secretary; John J. Mundo, Treasurer; Sister 
Superior Madeline, Superintendent. 

Care of orphan girls, three to fourteen years of age. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 266, viz., 75 paying, 63 partly 
paying, 128 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Board of children 
Bazaar .... 
Interest .... 
Refund .... 



$1,088 33 

1,500 13 

7,154 31 

2,046 31 

320 31 

66 00 

Total current receipts . . S12,17o 39 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 10,088 26 



$22,263 65 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Religious 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$1,752 00 

50 00 
7,422 74 
1,573 88 

776 31 

1,050 00 

827 95 

$13,452 88 
8,810 77 

$22,263 65 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $112,000. 



SALVATION ARMY OP MASSACHUSETTS, INC., 8 East Brookline St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Commander Evangeline Booth, President; Maj. Burleigh I. 
Hillman, Secretary; Col. Adam Gifford, Treasurer. 

To benefit the poor by relieving their bodies from disease and 
suffering, bringing their minds and hearts under the influence of 
education and the Christian religion, and assisting them to estab- 
lish themselves in life. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 73. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 215,650, viz., 
116,852 paying, 10 partly paying, 98,788 free; outside insti- 
tution, 65, 476, all free; number of families aided, 6,564. 



126 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 




Cr. 




From beneficiaries . 


$75,384 95 


Salaries and wages . 


$22,289 46 


Subscriptions and donations 


40,856 46 


Printing, postage, and oflSce 




Annuities and bequests to in- 




supplies .... 


18,606 55 


come ..... 


4,079 42 


Provisions and supplies . 


34,399 70 


Percentage from corps for over- 




Rent 


20,119 70 


sight ..... 


15,797 07 


Heat, light, and power . 
Furnishings and incidental re- 


2,767 79 








Total current receipts . 


$136,117 90 


pairs ..... 


7,828 42 


Cash on hand at beginning of 


. 


Traveling expenses, freight, and 




year 


12,909 35 


hauling .... 
Grants to poor corps and needy 


11,056 71 






officers .... 


10,092 76 






Grants to beneficiaries 


10,986 61 






General and oversight expenses 


10.879 55 




$149,027 25 


$149,027 25 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $557,354.68; amount of mortgage on same, $287,194.57. 



SCOTS' CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 101 Tremont St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1786.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Sewall C. Brackett, President; Thomas R. P. Gibb, Secretary; 
John N. Jordan, Treasurer. 

'To furnish relief to Scotsmen, their immediate descendants and 
families, and to give them information and advice. 

Number aided during year, 2,217; number of families aided, 
389. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



S620 00 

2,755 50 

144 55 

$3,520 05 
671 01 



$4,191 06 



Cr. 
Printing, postage, and office sup 

plies .... 
Rent .... 

Heat, light, and power 
Charitable relief 
Miscellaneous . 

Total cuirent expenses 
Cash on hand 



$272 38 

326 75 

8 25 

2,760 00 

177 37 

$3,544 75 
646 31 

$4,191 06 



Value of investments, $50,095. 



SEARS AND OTHER FUNDS, 



TRUSTEES OF, 
1912.) 



Boston. (Incorporated 



Report for year ending February 28, 1915. 

Howard Stockton, 50 State St., Boston, President; W. Rod- 
man Fay, Secretary; George H. Richards, Treasurer. 

To hold and manage trust funds for charitable purposes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 2, the Cathedral and a mission. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



127 



Dr. 
Income from investments 
Cash on hand . 



S22.122 77 
1,843 64 



Salaries and wages 

Interest . 

Taxes on real estate 

Beneficiaries 

Miscellaneous . 



Total current expenses 
j Transfer to capital . 
Cash on hand . 



S23,966 41 



S500 00 

1,920 00 

2,180 50 

15,041 09 

10 00 

$19,651 59 

4.293 50 

21 32 

$23,966 41 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
S46,800 (part of a building); amount of mortgage on whole 
building and land, $48,000; value of investments, 8246,779.94. 



SHAW ASYLUM FOR MARINERS' CHILDREN, 12 Ashbiirton PI., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1877.) 

JReport for 3-ear ending December 31, 1914. 

Quincy A. Shaw, President; Walter C. Smith, Clerk and 
Treasurer. 
Aid to children and widows of mariners. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number aided during year, 521. 



Dt. 

Income from investments 



Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 603,243 60 



I Cr. 

S25,715 85 1 Salaiies and wages . 



$628,959 45 



Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Rent 

Outside aid for children 
Widows' aid . 
Outside aid expenses 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



S2,520 00 

75 00 

300 00 

10,669 47 

7,797 00 

552 71 

821,914 18 

607,045 27 

$628,959 45 



Value of investments, $607,045.27. 



SOCIETY FOR HELPING DESTITUTE MOTHERS AND INFANTS, 279 
Tremont St., Boston. (Incorporated 1904.) 

Report for jjear ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. A. D. Sheffield, President; Miss Lilian Freeman Clarke, 
Secretary; Mrs. Bertram Greene, Treasurer; Miss E. M. Locke, 
Agent. 

To aid destitute mothers and infants. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 97. 



128 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 

Bond sold .... 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$2,117 82 


Salaries and wages 


. 


$2,666 32 


1,598 00 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




445 66 


plies .... 




414 69 


66 74 


Provisions and supplies 




387 66 




Heat, light, and power 




34 36 




$4,228 22 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


43 35 


625 00 


Traveling expenses 




112 68 


924 06 


Miscellaneous . 




52 60 


659 75 








Total current expenses . 




$3,711 66 




Income invested 




1,701 17 




Cash on hand . 




1,024 20 


$6,437 03 


$6,437 03 



Value of investments, $8,150. 



SOCIETY FOR MINISTERIAL RELIEF, 25 Beacon St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1850.) 

Keport for year ending May 2, 1915. 

Rev. James DeNormandie, President; Rev. Henry W. Foote, 
Secretary; Stephen W. Phillips, Treasurer. 

Relief of Unitarian clergymen who are in necessitous cir- 
cumstances. 

Number aided during year, 34. 



Dr. 

Annuities and bequests to income $5,000 00 
Income from investments . . 10,893 28 



Total current receipts . . $15,893 28 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 6,046 33 



Cr. 
Printing, postage, and office 
suppUes .... 
Donations to beneficiaries 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand .... 



$21,939 61 

Value of investments, $214,449.10. 



$20 10 
10,425 00 

$10,445 10 
6,079 79 
5,414 72 

$21,939 61 



SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF OF AGED OR DISABLED EPISCOPAL 
CLERGYMEN, 40 State St., Boston. (Incorporated 1846.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, D.D., President; Rev. Prescott 
Evarts, Secretary; George P. Gardner, Treasurer. 

For the relief of aged or disabled Episcopal clergymen. 
Number aided during year, 10. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income frorn investments . 
Trustees of donations 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 




Cr. 



Auditing . 
Safe deposits 
Beneficiaries 



$5 00 

10 GO 

3.095 35 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$7,982 19 

Value of investments, $109,000. 



$3,110 35 
1,653 00 
3,218 84 

$7,982 19 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



129 



SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF OF THE WIDOWS AND ORPHANS OF 
CLERGYMEN OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 1 Joy 
St., Boston. (Incorporated 1841.) 

Report for year ending April 1, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, President; Rev. Reuben Kidner, 
Secretary; Russell S. Codman, Treasurer. 

For the relief of widows and orphans of clergymen of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in Massachusetts. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 7L 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 



$1,499 20 
9,189 96 



$10,689 16 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$75 00 


Printing, postage, and 


office 


supplies 


64 15 


Paid to capital 


344 75 


Appropriations 


8,341 69 


To beneficiaries 


675 00 


Total current expenses 


. S9.500 59 


Cash on hand . 


1,188 57 




S10,689 16 



Value of investments, $204,936.47. 



SOCIETY OF ST. MARGARET (St. Monica's Home), 125 Highland St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1882.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1915. 

George O. G. Coale, President; Paul M. Hubbard, Secretary; 
Sister Vera Margaret, Treasurer and Sister in Charge. 

For the care and treatment of sick colored women and 
children, including a tuberculosis ward of ten to twelve beds. 

Number of paid oiSicers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 76, viz., 47 partly paying, 29 free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries and subscrip- 




Salaries and wages 


S2,614 00 


tions and donations 


S4,389 93 


Printing, postage, and office sujy- 




Income from investments . 


237 14 


plies .... 


605 24 


From patients .... 


4,035 87 


Provisions and supplies 


2,732 41 


From industries 


648 60 


Heat and light . 


714 30 






Furnishings and incidental repairs 


658 60 






Total current receipts 


$9,311 54 


Special repairs and alterations 


723 05 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


243 44 


Drugs and hospital supplies 
Express, telephone, insurance 


163 97 






water tax, and interest . 


365 64 


, 




Expenses for industries 


222 67 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 


465 30 




§9,265 18 






Cash on hand . 


289 80 




$9,554 98 


$9,554 98 



130 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $13,966.14; amount of mortgage on same, $2,600; value 
of investments, $4,899.50. 



SOUTH BOSTON DAY NURSERY, 521 East Seventh St., South Boston. 
(Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. Ellerton James, President and Treasurer; Mrs. Edward 
C. Williams, Secretary; Mrs. C. W. Somes, Matron. 

Day nursery for children under five years of age whose 
mothers are obliged to work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 155. 



Dr. 



From beneficiaries 


$188 47 


Sftbscriptions and donations 


807 50 


Proceeds of sale 


5 00 


Proceeds of concert . 


616 15 


Proceeds of bridge party 


126 10 



$1,74.3 22 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies .... 

Pro\-isions and supplies 

Heat, light, and power 

Incidental repairs, insurance, and 
water .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Deficit, 1913 
Cash on hand . 



S624 50 

9 00 

548 87 
S3 84 



28 


60 


25 


43 


$1,320 


24 


36 


12 


386 86 



$1,743 22 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $3,000; value of investments, $1,290.22. 



SOUTH BOSTON LITHUANIAN BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, 307-309 E St., 
South Boston. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1915. 

John P. Tuinila, President; N. Gendrolins, Secretary; M. 
Zoba, Treasurer. 

A center for the Lithuanians of South Boston and vicinity; 
to assist those who are worthy to obtain an education, and to 
aid those in distress. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 4; families aided, 1. 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



131 



Dr. 



New members . 
HaUhire . 
Entertainments 
Loans and securities 
Miscellaneous . 



$136 00 

3,382 28 

195 35 

2,550 00 

559 50 



Total current receipts . . $6,829 13 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 433 38 



$7,262 51 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup 

plies .... 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Taxes, interest, and insurance 
Mortgage and loans . 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



SSI 7 30 



30 90 


436 


63 


1,283 


48 


915 


89 


2,605 00 


416 


89 


$6,506 09 


756 


42 


$7,262 


51 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $25,000; amount of mortgage on same, $11,000; value of 
investments, $11,450. 



SOUTH BOSTON SAMARITAN SOCIETY, South Boston. (Incorporated 

1840.) 

Report for year ending November 7, 1915. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Holbrook, President; Miss Myra Mitchell, 
Secretary; Mrs. Sarah C. Harrington, 28 Mason Ter., Brookline, 
Treasurer. 

To assist the worthy poor of South Boston regardless of age, 
sex, creed, etc. 

Number aided during year, 44. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations . . $10 00 

Annuities and bequests to income . 40 40 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand 



$50 40 
70 



$51 10 

Value of investments, $2,000. 



Cr. 
Provisions and supplies 
Cash on hand 



$47 00 
4 10 



\b\ 10 



SOUTH END DAY NURSERY, 25 Dover St., Boston. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Mrs. Harriet Minot Laughlin, President; Miss Elizabeth H. 
Flint, Secretary; Lincoln Bryant, Treasurer; Miss Annie M. 
Chaffee, Matron. 

To help needy mothers, who from necessity are wage earners, 
by caring for their children during working hours. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 184; number of days' care, 14,876. 



132 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Dr. 
From beneficial ies 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Interest on bank balance 
Sale of securities for reimburse 
ment .... 



$881 10 
2,721 50 
1,000 00 
1,465 00 
26 16 



1,038 75 



Total current receipts . . $7,132 51 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 933 67 



$8,066 18 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies ..... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light, and power 

P\jrnishings and incidental repairs 

Purchase of securities for invest- 
ment ..... 

Paid on mortgage principal 

Mortgage interest 

Outings for children . 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand .... 



$2,420 03 


4 80 


1,191 


56 


192 


98 


347 


12 


2,010 


97 


1,000 


00 


202 


50 


340 57 


223 00 


$7,933 43 


132 


65 


$8,066 


18 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $14,900; amount of mortgage on same, $4,000; value of 
investments, $31,630.02. 



SOUTH END DAY NURSERY AUXILIARY, 25 Dover St.; Boston. (In- 
corporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending May 18, 1915. 

Dr. Loretta Joy Cummins, President; Miss Sally S. Allen, 
Secretary; Mrs. George A. Chapman, Treasurer. 

To assist the South End Day Nursery by paying mortgage and 
interest and helping with running expenses. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Interest . 

Fair 

Ball 

Bridge 

Miscellaneous 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$106 50 


38 


57 


1,760 


12 


303 


78 


45 


30 


1 


81 


$2,256 08 


2,079 


85 


$4,335 93 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and oflBce sup 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Mortgage . 

Interest on mortgage . 
Summer running expenses 
Summer outings 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$57 97 
107 09 
1,000 00 
225 00 
500 00 
200 00 
28 51 

$2,118 57 
2,217 36 

$4,335 93 



SOUTH END DIET KITCHEN, 21 Common St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1882.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. I. Tucker Burr, President; Miss Mary St. B. Eustis, 
Secretary; Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, Treasurer; Mrs. A. C. Wilder, 
Superintendent. 

To furnish diets to the sick poor. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 20,416. 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



133 



Dr. 
From beneficial ies 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$255 09 

1,559 00 

111 75 

2,098 00 

17 04 

$4,040 88 

476 79 



$4,517 67 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies ..... 
Pro\'isions and supplies 

Rent 

Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$735 75 

5 60 

3,231 64 

300 00 

13 12 

19 45 

69 20 

$4,374 76 
142 91 

$4,517 67 



Value of investments, $46,044.33. 



THE SOUTH END HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 20 Union Pk., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1898.) 

Report for 3'ear ending December 31, 1914. 

Rev. George Hodges, President; William I. Cole, Secretary; 
James A. Lowell, Treasurer; Robert A. Woods, Head of the 
House. 

For the improvement of the conditions of life and labor in a 
tenement and lodging house district, by providing opportunities 
for industrial and domestic training, and for healthful, social 
intercourse. Co-operates with relief-giving agencies. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 25. 

Number aided during year, 2,000; viz., 1,000 partly paying, 
1,000 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Board and room rent of residents 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Loans from directors 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



Cr. 



S747 51 


Salaries and wages . 


$17,841 70 


19,719 71 


Printing, postage, and office 


900 00 


supplies 


857 02 


6,519 64 


Provisions and supplies 


5,887 03 


1,481 30 


Rent .... 


420 00 




Heat, light, and power 


2,077 04 




$29,368 16 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




5,500 00 


pairs .... 


953 84 




Interest and insiu-ance 


2,259 79 


1,602 68 


Summer work . 


1.930 87 




Special instruction . 


613 90 




Miscellaneous . 

Total ciu-rent expenses . 


2,058 37 




$34,899 56 




Cash on hand . 


1,571 28 


$36,470 84 


$36,470 84 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $122,500; mortgage on same, S31,500; value of invest- 
ments, §19,269.50. 



134 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



SUMMER STREET FIRE FUND, 85 Milk St., Boston. (Incorporated 1906.) 

Report for year ending October 30, 1915. 

Henry G. Jordan, President; Courtenay Crocker, Secretary; 
James R. Hooper, Treasurer. 

Supplying tools to mechanics who have lost same by fire. 
Number aided during year, 14. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $1,304 08 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 4,270 42 



$5,574 50 



Cr. 
Tools supplied to mechanics 
Cash on hand . 



$198 00 
5,376 50 



$5,574 50 



Value of investments, $30,814.30. 



SUNNYSIDE DAY NURSERY, 16 Hancock St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1902.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Miss Frances C. Sturgis, President; Miss Caroline E. Ward, 
Secretary; I. McD. Garfield, Treasurer; Mrs. S. E. Hines, 
Matron. 

To furnish a day nursery for the care of young children of 
working women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 94, viz., 91 paying, 3 partly paying. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
St. James co-operative sales 
Special contribution . 
Proceeds of garden lecture 

Total current receipts 
Carried to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$177 52 

3,016 00 

694 40 

7 70 

246 27 

310 00 

$4,451 89 

11 20 

997 77 



$5,460 86 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$1,465 12 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies ..... 


82 59 


Pro\'isions and supplies 


773 09 


Telephone .... 


58 94 


Moving piano and Cleaning win- 




dows ..... 


96 25 


Heat, light, and water 


525 42 


Taxes and insurance . 


541 08 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


207 24 


Mortgage interest 


405 00 


Laundry 


198 85 


Professional visitor 


245 89 


Dancing lessons and sewing class 


59 54 


Dentistry work .... 


25 65 


Druggists' supplies 


27 00 


INIiscellaneous .... 


74 10 


Total current expenses 


$4,785 76 


Cash on hand .... 


675 10 




$5,460 86 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $21,674.11; amount of mortgage on same, $9,000; value 
of investments, $14,225.62. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



135 



SWEDISH CHARITABLE SOCIETY OF GREATER BOSTON, Boston. 

(Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1915. 

Gustaf Sundelius, President; George Nelson, 90-i Tremont 
Building, Boston, Secretary; Anton Hedin, Treasurer. 

To furnish relief, advice, and assistance to persons of Swedish 
descent and their families; also to erect and support a home 
for aged and incapacitated Swedish people. 

Number aided during year, 28; number of families aided, 12. 



Dr. 
Annuities and bequests to income . 
Income from investments 


SS7 00 
267 02 


Cr. 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies ..... 

Rent 

Donations ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Income invested .... 
Cash on hand .... 


$55 75 
5 00 

139 00 
4 50 


Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 


S354 02 
449 17 




S204 25 
267 02 
331 92 



SS03 19 



SS03 19 



Value of investments, S7,213.73. 



SWEDISH HOME OF PEACE, 169 Townsend St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 

1914.) 

Report for j-ear ending December 31, 1914. 

Gustaf F. Sodergren, President; C. V. Bauman, Secretary; 
John A. Danielson, Treasurer; Miss Ebba Ruhnborg, Matron. 

Home for Scandinavian working girls out of employment or 
in need of rest. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 307, viz., 297 pay- 
ing, 6 partly paying, 2 free; outside institution, 3. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



; Cr. 

S3,318 57 ! Salaries and wages . 

438 35 I Printing, postage, and office sup- 

238 09 ! plies 

• I Provisions and supplies 

S3,995 01 Heat, light, and power 

73 08 Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$4,068 09 



S754 


00 


8 


25 


2,123 


63 


310 04 


83 


50 


6S5 


00 


$3,964 42 


103 


67 


$4,068 


09 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, 811,000; mortgage on same, S8,000. 



136 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



SWISS BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, Boston. (Incorporated 1865.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

William Conza, 34 Oakview Ter., Jamaica Plain, President, 
Mrs. Emma M. Schuerch, Secretary; Mrs. Elizabeth C. Fischer, 
Treasurer. 

Advice and financial assistance to Swiss citizens or their 
descendants. 

Number aided during year, 51. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


S9-t 00 


Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 




Interest ..... 


112 34 


plies ..... 


fl6 00 


Received from Swiss government 


4.S 03 


Swiss relief fund 


1,000 00 


Loan repaid .... 


9 00 


Relief in Boston 


131 95 






Interest ..... 


14 32 


Total current receipts 


$263 37 




Cash on hand at beginning of year 


2,806 78 


Total current expenses 


$1,162 27 






Cash on hand .... 


1.907 88 




$3,070 15 


$3,070 15 



TEMPORARY HOME FOR WORKING WOMEN, 453 Shawmut Ave., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1878.) 

Report for year ending Octobei 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Henry R. Dalton, President; Miss Laura Revere Liltle, 
Secretary; Richard C. Storey, Treasurer; Mrs. Maude A. Edson, 
Superintendent. 

Temporary home and aid for unemployed working women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 507, viz., 106 pay- 
ing, 401 free; outside institution, 2; number of families aided, 4. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Annuities and bequests to income 

Income from inv 

Laundry . 

Sewing room 

Board 

Lodgings . 

Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



SI 30 00 


Salaries and wages 


$2,962 65 


2,605 00 


Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 




2,081 89 


plies ..... 


67 81 


2,561 28 


P^o^-isions and supplies 


1,808 76 


250 07 


Heat, light, and power 


455 64 


49S 90 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


796 98 


7 50 


Sewing room .... 


107 35 


84 11 


Laimdry and laundry hire . 


385 74 




Ice . . ... 

Wiring house .... 


69 72 
ISS 00 


$8,218 75 


597 96 


Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses 


600 93 




$7,443 58 




Cash on hand .... 


1.373 13 


SS,S16 71 


$S,816 71 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, 815,000; value of investments, 859,992.25. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



137 



TRINITY CHURCH HOME FOR THE AGED (RACHEL ALLEN MEMO- 
RIAL), 135 South Huntington Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1915. 

Rev. Alexander Mann, D.D., President; Mrs. Percival H. 
Lombard, Secretary; Mrs. Isaac R. Thomas, Treasurer; Mrs. 
Annie E. Jar vis, Matron. 

Boarding home for aged women of the church. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 24. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $5,179 66 

Subscriptions and donations . 700 00 

Anmiities and bequests to income 5,000 00 

Income from investments . . 6,370 99 

Total current receipts . . S17,250 65 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,422 85 



$19,673 50 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental 

pairs .... 
Telephone 
Insurance 
Water rates 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$3,368 04 

8,454 51 

1,181 96 

4,547 48 

82 71 

201 03 

141 10 

$17,976 83 

1,696 67 

$19,673 50 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $40,000; amount of mortgage on same, $5,000; value of 
investments, $26,500. 



UNION RESCUE MISSION, 64a Dover St., Boston. (Incorporated 1891.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Frank F. Davidson, President; Clarke W. Morehouse, Sec- 
retary; Nathan W. Dennett, Treasurer; P. E. Call, Superin- 
tendent. 

The rescue of lost men and women and the reconstruction of 
broken lives. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 8,000; number of families aided, 
25. 

Cr. 
$129 24 Salaries and wages . . . $3,698 29 
,845 78 Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 788 23 

Rent 400 00 

Heat, light, and power . . 293 26 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 229 58 

Interest 78 30 

Lodgings and temporary aid . 1,397 15 

Total current expenses . . $6,884 81 

Cash on hand . . . . 90 21 

$6,975 02 $6,975 02 



Dr. 

Cash on hand . 
Subscriptions and donations 



138 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY 



[P. D. 17. 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $14,200; amount of mortgage on same, 89,000; value of 
investments, S3,S00. 

UNITARIAN SERVICE PENSION SOCIETY, 25 Beacon St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1915. 

Judge James P. Parmenter, President; Rev. Robert S. Loring, 
Secretary; Rev. John H. Applebee, Treasurer. 

Pensioning all who have reached the age of sixty-five and 
have served at least twenty years in the Unitarian ministry. 

Number aided during year, 56. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . S3, 549 49 

Income from investments . . 3,297 79 

Total current receipts . . $6,S47 28 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 7,036 75 



Cr. 



For pensions . 
Permanent fund 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$13.SS4 03 I 

Value of investments, 874,715.25. 



S7,035 84 
350 00 



$7,385 84 
6,498 19 



$13,884 03 



UNITED HEBREW BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. 

Incorporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Simon Vorenberg, President; A. E. Pinanski, Secretary; M. H. 
Goldschmidt, Treasurer; Martha M. Silverman, Superintendent. 

To aid temporarily the deserving Jewish poor who have lived 
here for not less than one year. 

Number aided during year, 3,-482; families aided, 669. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Maturities 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year .... 



$557 06 

22,870 00 

1,000 00 

595 55 

1,750 00 



§26,772 61 



478 06 



$27,250 67 



and 



Cr. 

Cash given 

Board of children 

Board of sick . 

Transportation 

Diet orders 

Coal 

Stationery, postage 

ing 
Groceries 
Medicine 
Loans and estabUshing Ln 

ness 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



pnnt- 



busi 



$16, 



890 


56 


2S3 


60 


225 


10 


193 


22 


.259 


82 


961 82 


39 75 


270 


00 


6 75 



870 
665 


57 
36 


$23,666 
2,705 

878 


55 
78 
34 



$27,250 67 



Value of investments, §16,450. 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



139 



VINCENT MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 125 South Huntington Ave., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending March 1, 1915. 

George H. Davenport, President; Rev. Reuben Kidner, Sec- 
retary; Charles H. Parker, Treasurer; Miss Jean C. Fraser, 
Matron. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number aided during year, 236, viz., 148 paying, 11 partly 
paying, 77 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscription? and donations 
Income from investments . 
Attendants .... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



S9,016 8S 

3,221 43 

5,706 43 

158 00 

31 02 

$18,133 76 

44 40 



$18,178 16 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and oflSce 
supplies 

Provisions and supplies 

Coal and wood 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ...» 

Laundry 

Hospital supplies 

Water .... 

Repairs .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$7,744 22 

163 52 

4,734 65 

905 98 

582 48 

553 72 

758 56 
1,268 92 
147 00 
434 58 
591 30 

$17,884 93 
293 23 

$18,178 16 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, 875,628.52; amount of mortgage on same, 89,000; value 
of investments, 8157,279.76. 



WASHINGTONIAN HOME, 41 Waltham St., Boston. (Incorporated 1859.) 

Report for year ending April 25, 1915. 

George Holden Tinkbam, President; George B. Stebbins, 
Clerk; Henry W. Hart, Treasurer; Dr. Victor A. Ellsworth, 
Superintendent. 

Treatment and care of male inebriates. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year, 953, viz., 918 paying, 25 partly 
paying, 10 free. 



140 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Income from investments . 
Share of E. V. Ashton fund 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$11,636 00 
4,272 50 
1,950 00 


$17,858 50 
6,663 68 


$24,522 18 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$5,546 03 


Printing, postage, and 


office 




supplies 




193 54 


Provisions and supplies 


. 


5,579 86 


Heat, light, and power 


. 


1,369 00 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . 




3.243 95 


Drugs and medicines 




319 39 


Telephones 


, 


142 41 


Miscellaneous . 




670 50 


Total current expenses 


$17,064 68 


Cash on hand . 




7,457 50 




$24,522 18 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $67,000; value of investments, $96,893.24. 



THE WIDOWS' SOCIETY OF BOSTON, Boston. (Incorporated 1828.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Miss Anna T. Reynolds, President; Mrs. William C. Loring, 
Secretary; Henry S. Hunnewell, 87 Milk St., Boston, Treasurer. 

To visit and aid widows and unmarried women over sixty 
years of age. 

Number aided during year, 130. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $4,490 00 

Income from investments . . 8,552 03 

Total current receipts . . $13,042 03 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 4,234 16 



$17,276 19 



Cr. 
postage, and office 



Printing, 

supplies 
Paid to widows 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$61 64 

13,887 00 

$13,948 64 

497 81 

2,829 74 

$17,276 19 



Value of investments, $223,388.80. 



WINCHESTER HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 10 Eden St., Charlestown. 
(Incorporated 1865.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Walter S. Glidden, President; Leslie Langill, Secretary; Wil- 
liam P. Hart, Treasurer; Mrs. Cora iV. Roberts, Matron. 

Home for women over sixty years of age of American parentage 
and residents of Charlestown for ten years. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 
.Number aided during year, 43. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



141 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


. $1,632 65 


Salaries and wages . . . S3,273 00 


Subscriptions and donations 


623 37 


Printing, postage, and office 


Income from investments . 


. 10,486 10 


supplies . . . . 159 72 


Miscellaneous . 


34 34 


Provisions and supplies . . 5,381 01 
Heat, light, and power . 1,749 97 






Total current receipts . 


. 812,776 46 


Furnishings and incidental re- 


Loans to income 


. 2,478 86 


pairs 4,337 27 

Funeral exi)en3e3 ... 349 85 
Miscellaneous .... 4 50 




$15,255 32 


$15,255 32 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $45,328.09; value of investments, $133,834.60. 

WOMAN'S AUXILIARY OF THE NEW ENGLAND BAPTIST HOSPITAL, 
Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. F. W. Walsh, President; Mrs. "William Colton, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. J. H. Blanchard, Treasurer. 

To aid in the work of the New England Baptist Hospital. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations . S393 40 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 142 39 



S540 79 



Cr. 
Printing and postage . 
Furnishings 
Free bed 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



S30 25 
66 75 

250 00 
30 00 

$377 00 
163 79 

S540 79 



WOMAN'S CHARITY CLUB, Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury. (Incorporated 

1889.) 

Report for year ending April 17, 1915. 

Mrs. Esther Frances Boland, President; Mrs. Augustus L. 
Tallman, Secretary; Mrs. Arthur H. Janes, Treasurer. 

To assist in maintaining the Massachusetts Women's Hospital. 



Dr. 



In gathering 
Dues 

Donation day 
Junior Charity Club 
Committees 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



SI, 155 


06 


660 


00 


197 


78 


350 


00 


1,077 


29 


93 


35 


S3,533 48 1 


275 


63 


S3,S09 


11 



Cr. 



Printing, postage, and ofl&ce 


sup- 




plies .... 


, 


SS2 16 


Rent .... 


, 


100 00 


State federation tax . 




18 95 


Fire sprinklers on hospital . 




255 42 


Massachusetts Women's Hospital 


2,400 00 


Miscellaneous . 




79 30 


Total current expenses . 


S2,935 S3 


Cash on hand . 




873 28 




S3,S09 11 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, 836,600; value of investments, $2,272.24. 



142 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



WOMAN'S SEAMAN'S FRIEND SOCIETY, 14 Beacon St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. Herbert D. Heathfield, President; Mrs. Henry C. De- 
lano, Secretary; Josephine B. White, Treasurer. 

To provide necessary clothing for the sailor, and work for his 
general welfare, in connection with, and as auxiliary to, the 
Boston Seaman's Friend Society. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . S783 56 

Income from investments . . 311 80 

Annual memberships . . . 447 50 

Miscellaneous . . . . 97 62 

Total current receipts . . SI, 640 48 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 288 53 



Sl,929 01 



Cr. 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies S423 42 

Rent 65 00 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 72 89 

Work among sailors and hospitals 1,045 66 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



Sl,606 97 
322 04 



$1,929 01 



Value of investments, S8,820. 



WOMEN'S EDUCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL UNION, 264 Boylston St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1880.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Mrs. Mary Morton Kehew, President; Miss Florence Jack- 
son, Secretary; Mrs. Helen Peirce, Treasurer. 

To promote the educational, industrial, and social advance- 
ment of women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 294. 

Number of families aided, 468; number of persons receiving 
legal aid, 431. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
From all departments of the 

xmion 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Deficit .... 



S15,6S9 76 
294 00 



485,144 10 
966 75 



8502,094 61 
6,021 52 



§508,116 13 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Rent 

Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 
General operating exp>enses 



$173,067 73 

12,049 11 

7,662 14 

3,111 83 
312,225 32 



8508,116 13 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, 8186,356.30; amount of mortgage, S68,000; value of in- 
vestments, $51,785.54. 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



143 



WORKING GIRLS' HOME AND HOME OF THE GREY NUNS, 89 Union 
Park St., Boston. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President and Treasurer; 
Rt. Rev. J. P. E. O'Connell, Secretary; Sister Michaud, Superior. 

To provide a home for respectable working girls at a low rate. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 23. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 3,660, viz., 3,513 
paying, 92 partly paying, 55 free; outside institution, 3,545, 
all free; number of families aided, 16. 



Dr. 



Cash on hand . 
Board 
Interest . 
Work 
Miscellaneous . 



$9,262 92 

28,526 36 

43 98 

75 00 

34 88 


$37,943 14 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$3,668 04 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies . . . . . 


78 98 


Provisions and supplies 


16,162 93 


Heat, light, and power 


2,482 04 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . , . . . 


1,482 28 


Transfer 


13,500 00 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


61 50 


Total current expenses . 


$37,435 77 


Cash on hand .... 


507 37 




$37,943 14 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $64,830. 



Bridgewatee. 

BRIDGEWATER VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION, Bridgewater. (In- 
corporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Flora T. Little, President; Miss Edith M. Ames, Sec- 
retary; Mrs. Lois T. Blake, 3 Library PL, Bridgewater, Treasurer; 
Miss Sara Hinkley, Nurse. 

To give the sick, and especially those of limited means, the 
best home nursing under existing circumstances; also to assist 
in projects to benefit the public health. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 131, viz., 77 paying, 23 partly 
paying, 31 free. 



144 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Membership dues 
May breakfast . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$453 75 

67 88 

30 44 

202 00 

155 00 


$909 07 
547 65 


$1,456 72 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $1,006 00 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies ..... 18 65 
Provisions and supplies . . 3 30 
Telephone . . . , 6 50 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 6 50 
Car fare and team hire . . 21 75 

Total current expenses . . $1,062 70 

Income invested . . . 30 44 

Cash on hand .... 363 58 

$1,456 72 



Value of investments, $1,034.51. 



Brockton. (Incorporated 



Brockton. 

BROCKTON DAY NURSERY, 39 Everett St., 

1907.) 

Report for year ending June 1, 1915. 

Adelaide E. Shaw, President; Clara M. Folger, Secretary; 
Hattie M. Ford, Treasurer; Miss Ida F. Hiscoe, Superintendent. 

To care for young children during the working hours of the 
mothers. The building and endowment fund is held by the 
corporation of the Douglas Gift to the Brockton Day Nursery. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number of days' care, 3,358. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $334 56 

Annuities and bequests to income 684 96 

Tag day 519 39 

Total current receipts . . $1,538 91 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 596 59 



$2,135 50 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Sewer and water rates 
Tag day . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$711 26 

353 05 

243 16 

33 19 

44 83 

39 27 

172 70 

$1,597 46 
538 04 

$2,135 50 



BROCKTON HOSPITAL COMPANY, 680 Centre St., Brockton. (In- 
corporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

George H. Leach, President; Dr. Loring B. Packard, Secretary 
and Superintendent; William G. Allen, Treasurer. 

Care of medical, surgical, obstetrical cases, and emergencies. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 44. 

Number aided during year, 1,109, viz., 552 paying, 92 partly 
paying, 465 free. 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



145 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$16,833 59 


Salaries and wages . 


$13,751 78 


Subscriptions and donations 


4,063 89 


Printing, postage, and office 




Annuities and bequests to income 


8,050 00 


supplies 


629 62 


Income from investments . 


6,307 00 


Provisions and supplies . 


11,218 78 


Sales of supplies 


471 24 


Rent 


333 33 


Service of visiting nurse . 


20 00 


Heat, light, and power 


3,516 86 


Miscellaneous .... 


118 30 


Furnishings and incidental re- 








pairs 


1,852 66 






Total current receipts . 


$35,864 02 


Telephone, water, and sewer 


1,148 01 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Insurance and interest 


876 89 


year 


650 97 


Miscellaneous . . . . 
Total current expenses . 


2,486 03 




$35,813 96 






Cash on hand .... 


701 03 




$36,514 99 


$36,514 99 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$87,646.28; value of investments, $165,270.58. 



BROCKTON VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION, 64 West Elm St., 
Brockton. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Herbert L. Tinkham, President; Mrs. Joseph Hewett, 
Secretary; Mrs. Charles S. Pierce, Treasurer; Miss Mary McGee, 
Supervising Nurse. 

To give the sick, and especially those of limited means, the 
best home nursing under existing circumstances. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 963, viz., 508 paying, 105 partly 
paying, 350 free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Interest .... 
From patients . 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Com 

pany .... 
City of Brockton 
Blossom day 

Rent .... 

Miscellaneous . 



$1,846 85 

2 42 

694 72 



379 00 

514 50 

1,303 73 

54 00 

16 42 



Total current receipts . . $4,811 64 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 625 43 



$5,437 07 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $3,501 25 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies . 234 59 

Rent 221 00 

Heat, light, and power . . 8 00 

Blossom day expense . . . 371 23 

Car fare 267 48 

Telephone .... 46 39 

Miscellaneous . . . . 7 92 

Total current expenses . , $4,657 86 

Cash on hand .... 779 21 

$5,437 07 



DOUGLAS GIFT TO THE BROCKTON DAY NURSERY, TRUSTEES OP, 
39 Everett St., Brockton. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Warren A. Reed, President; John S. Kent, Secretary; Fred B. 
Howard, Treasurer. 

To hold real estate and trust fund given by W. L. Douglas to 
the Brockton Day Nursery. 



146 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Income from investments 



S435 59 



$435 59 



Cr. 



Paid to beneficiaries 
Miscellaneous 



$429 79 
5 80 



$435 59 



Value of real estate owned (occupied by the Brockton Day 
Nursery), $10,000; value of investments, $10,000. 



WALES HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 553 North Main St., Brockton. 
(^Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Horace A. Keith, President; Mrs. Lillian M. Keith, Secretary; 
Ottielena Field, Treasurer; Miss Emily A. Silver, Matron. 

Home for aged women not less than seventy years of age and 
residents of Brockton for five years preceding application. 
Admission fee, $250. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 18. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $500 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 3,867 51 

Income from investments . . 116 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 311 43 

Total current receipts . . $4,794 94 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 352 04 



$5,146 98 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies ..... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$1,548 96 

12 42 
1,945 67 

695 23 
493 21 
438 30 

$5,133 79 

13 19 

$5,146 98 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$21,000; value of investments, $96,950.70. 



Brookline. 

BROOKLINE DAY NURSERY, 10 Walter Ave., Brookline. (Incorporated 

1900.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. Frederic Higginson, President; Mrs. George D. Burrage, 
Secretary; Mrs. Charles F. Richardson, Treasurer; Miss Gena N. 
Dorsey, Matron. 

The care of children, under six years of age, during the day, 
while their mothers are at work. 

Number of paid employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 135. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



147 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


S499 55 


Salaries and wages 




$1.9S6 20 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,905 78 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




Income from investments . 


59 29 


plies .... 




72 61 


From fair .... 


1,147 95 


Pro^-isions and supplies 




979 54 


Clothing sales . 


121 73 


Telephone 




39 79 


Miscellaneous . 


25 


Heat, light, and water 




91 11 






Furnishings and incidental repairs 


151 00 






Total current receipts 


S3, 734 55 


Support of playground 




176 73 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 433 82 


Subscription to girls' camp 




37 00 






Conference of day nurseries 




3 00 






Rent of safe deposit box 




5 00 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 




20 00 




$3,561 98 






Cash on hand . 




606 39 




S4,168 37 


$4,168 37 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
810,000; value of investments, $1,011.11. 



THE BROOKLINE FRIENDLY SOCIETY, corner High and Walnut Sts., 
Brookline. (Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Mrs. James M. Codman, President; Harold C. Haskell, Secre- 
tary; Albert P. Briggs, Treasurer; Mrs. Elizabeth K. Taft, 
Superi7iiende?it. 

To co-operate with the poor of Brookline in efforts for their 
improvement. Incidentally, numerous departments have been 
established, as summer camp, district nurse, etc. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 553; number of families aided, 196. 



From beneficiaries . 


. Sl,231 18 


Subscriptions and donations 


8,911 01 


Annuities and bea.uests to income 1,000 00 


Income from investments . 


778 00 


Rents .... 


462 25 


^Io\-ing-picture receipts 


2,315 55 


Miscellaneous . 


92 22 


Total current receipts . 


. 814,790 21 


Cash on hand at beginning 


of 


year .... 


. 2,119 83 



§16,910 04 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . §5,7 tl 29 
Printing, postage, and office 

supplies .... 579 52 
Pro\-isions and supplies . . 1,155 20 
Heat, light, and power . . 892 39 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 733 81 

Boys' summer camp . . 945 54 

Mo\-ing pictures . . . 1,872 14 

Interest 332 92 

Miscellaneous . . . . 136 98 

Total current expenses . . $12,389 79 

Mortgage .... 4,000 00 

Cash on hand .... 520 25 

$16,910 04 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$54,106.39; amount of mortgage on same, $4,500; value of in- 
vestments, $15,490.12. 



148 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY 



[P. D. r 



FREE HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN, Pond Ave. 

1879.) 



Brookline. (Incorporated 



Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

George R. Fearing, Jr., President; Nathaniel U. Walker, 
Secretary; Frederick J. Bradlee, Treasurer; Miss H. J. Ewin, 
Superintendent. 

Care and treatment of needy women suffering from diseases 
peculiar to their sex. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 44. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 834, all free. 

Total number of days' care rendered, 13,941. 

Total number of visits in out-patient department during year, 
6,943. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Cancer fund .... 
Library- fund .... 
Bequests and investments 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



S15,281 


40 


21,624 


57 


3,971 


05 


25 


00 


89,946 


07 


$130,848 09 


7,741 


41 


$138,589 50 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$17,137 37 


P*rinting, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


207 28 


Pro\-isions and supplies . 


9,505 94 


Heat, light, and power 


5.338 83 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


1.080 45 


Medical laboratory' supplies 


3,419 69 


From various funds 


5,452 40 


Miscellaneous 


1,108 72 



Total current expenses 
Investments . 
Cash on hand 



$43,250 68 

93,187 65 

2,151 17 

$138,589 50 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$150,000; value of investments, $547,836.03. 



Cambridge. 

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF CAMBRIDGE, 763 Massachusetts Aye., 
Cambridge. (Incorporated 1883.) 

Report for j'ear ending November 1, 1915. 

Carroll W. Doten, President; Miss Mary H. Winslow, Secre- 
tary; Henry A. Nichols, Treasurer; Miss Mary L. Birtwell, 
General Secretary. 

To promote co-operation among societies and individuals; to 
study the needs of all applicants and secure prompt and adequate 
treatment; to develop self-help; preserve the home; encourage 
thrift; diminish pauperism; enlist and train volunteers, etc. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



149 



Number of families or individuals dealt with or worked for, 
830; number of families or individuals who received material 
relief, 262. 



Dr. 



,977 31 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$6,477 52 


Salaries and wages 


$6,212 42 


Annuities and bequests to income 


100 00 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




Income from investments . 


548 04 


plies ..... 


402 24 


Proceeds of sale 


129 25 


Rent 


498 63 






Light 


4 49 






Total cvurent receipts 


S7,254 81 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


81 55 


Loans to income 


2,722 50 


Telephone .... 


248 47 






Car fares 


162 87 






Collecting subscriptions 


23 07 






Delegates to National Conference 


112 38 






Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses 


156 27 




$7,902 39 






Deficit November 4, 1914 . 


2,070 35 






Cash on hand .... 


4 57 



,977 31 



Value of investments, $13,148.37. 



AVON HOME, 689 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge. (Incorporated 1874.) 
Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

William W. Dallinger, President; Mrs. Charles L. Stebbins, 
Clerk; Miss Mary A. Ellis, Treasurer; Miss Emma O. Stannard, 
General Secretary. 

Cares for children (boys and girls) found destitute within the 
limits of Cambridge (placing work). 

Number of paid oflBcers or employees, 5. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 148; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in full, 
51; in part, 62; not reimbursed, 35. Monthly average number 
of children under supervision in foster homes, 71. Number of 
placing-out visitors, 1. 



Dt. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Annual sale .... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . . 



$6,791 81 


892 


32 


12,000 00 1 


8,566 


77 


1,292 


40 


8 


00 


$29,551 


30 


1,732 


28 


$31,283 58 1 



Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, 

supplies 
Telephone 
Rent 

Traveling expenses 
Clothing 

Board of children 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current exptenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



Cr. 



and office 



$3,544 00 

352 29 
133 26 
468 00 
339 68 
311 80 
8,805 66 
400 52 

$14,355 21 

16,486 85 

441 52 

$31,283 58 



Value of investments, $230,000. 



150 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BAPTIST HOME, 308 Brookline St., Cambridge. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Eeport for year ending January 16, 1915. 

Oliver M. Wentworth, President; William Albert McCoy, 
Secretary; Franklin P. Daly, Treasurer; Anna M. Cummings, 
Superintendent. 

Home for aged persons of the Baptist faith in Massachusetts. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Number aided during year, 35. 

Dr. 



From beneficiaries . . . S12,676 90 

Subscriptions and donations . 4,233 27 

Income from investments . . 5,149 32 

Total current receipts . . $22,059 49 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,601 98 



$23,661 47 



Cr. 

and oflBce 



Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage 
supplies 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$3,642 00 

23 69 
3,584 63 
1,211 08 

962 71 
4,963 09 

$14,387 20 
3,800 00 
5,474 27 

$23,661 47 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$21,500; value of investments, $85,000. 



BETHESDA SOCIETY, 309 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge.^ (Incorporated 

1854.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Rev. Raymond Calkins, President; Mrs. Livingston Cushing, 
Secretary; Lewis Kennedy Morse, Treasurer; Miss Abbie J. 
Anderson, Matron. 

Home for wayward girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 30, viz., 13 partly paying, 17 free. 



Dr. 



$434 09 

327 00 

4,321 44 



From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From The Refuge in the City of 

Boston 2,972 29 

Trustees of Ashton fund . . 1,000 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 59 70 



Total current receipts . . $9,114 52 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 458 39 



$9,572 91 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $2,391 76 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 364 49 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,418 69 

Heat, light, and power . . 464 05 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 511 87 

Insurance . . . . 25 00 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$5,175 86 
4,397 05 



$9,572 91 



Value of investments, $122,775.50. 



1 Now 4 Joy Street, Boston. 



Part II.l 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



151 



CAMBRIDGE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION, 689 Massachusetts 
Ave., Cambridge. (Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Eugene A. Darling, M.D., President; Mrs. Mabel Greeley 
Smith, Secretary; A. Mead Wheeler, Treasurer. 

To study conditions concerning tuberculosis in Cambridge; 
to inform the community as to causes and prevention of tuber- 
culosis; and to arouse general interest in securing adequate pro- 
vision for the care of tuberculous patients in their homes, and in 
hospitals and sanatoria. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number of families dealt with during year, 770. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $3,035 86 

Interest ..... 5 03 

Total current receipts . . $3,040 89 

Loans to income . . . 450 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 27 32 



$3,518 21 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$1,854 77 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies 


276 48 


Rent 


500 04 


Telephone . . . . 


71 73 


Educational . . . . 


60 42 


Interest . . . . . 


8 28 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


39 36 


Total current expenses . 


$2,811 08 


Loans paid . . . . 


675 00 


Cash on hand . . . . 


32 13 




$3,518 21 



CAMBRIDGE HOMES FOR AGED PEOPLE, 360 Mt. Auburn St., Cam- 
bridge. (Incorporated 1887.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Jeremiah Smith, Jr., President; Helen W. Aubin, Secretary; 
George Rowland Cox, Treasurer; Miss Christine Nicholson, 
Matron. 

Home for Protestant persons not less than sixty-five years of 
age, and residents of Cambridge for ten years or more. Ad- 
mission, $300 for single person; $450 for couple. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number aided during year in institution, 54; outside institu- 
tion, 1. 



152 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 

Subscriptions and donations ' 

Bequests 

Income from investments . 

Admission fees 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Mortgage payments 
Mary E. Fox fund . 
Sale of investments . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



51,842 67 


1,455 


50 


700 


00 


9,120 98 


2,550 00 


221 


00 


$15,890 


15 


336 00 1 


8 


20 


1,222 


36 


879 


77 


$18,336 48 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$4,881 65 


Printing, postage, and oflSce 




supplies 


71 64 


Provisions and supplies 


6,007 73 


Telephone 


32 41 


Heat, light, and power 


1,886 83 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


996 28 


Burial expenses 


802 81 


Water .... 


202 21 


Outdoor relief . 


294 00 


Insurance 


568 00 


Miscellaneous . 


423 47 


Total current expenses . 


$16,167 03 


Mortgage expenses . 


1 40 


Mary E. Fox fund . 


55 00 


Capital invested 


1,137 59 


Cash on hand . 


975 46 




$18,336 48 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$109,066.66; value of investments, $193,433.41. 



CAMBRIDGE HOSPITAL. 



330 Mt. Auburn 
porated 1871.) 



St., Cambridge. (Incor- 



Report for year eDding December 31, 1914. 

Henry P. Walcott, M.D., President; Albert M. Barnes, Secre- 
tary; Francis E. Seaver, Treasurer; Miss Alma E. Grant, 
Swperintendent. 

Hospital for sick and disabled persons. Chronic and con- 
tagious diseases (except scarlet fever and diphtheria) not ad- 
mitted. No other restrictions. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 53. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 932, viz., 100 pay- 
ing, 576 partly paying, 256 free; outside institution, 7,843, all 
free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 



$14,260 57 

3,184 45 

1,230 36 

15,452 78 


$34,128 16 
18,790 61 


$52,918 77 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$19,445 51 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


1.152 44 


Provisions and supplies 


11,103 94 


Heat, light, and power 


5,832 26 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


8,554 54 


Medical and surgical supplies . 


3,285 89 


Insurance .... 


546 93 


Miscellaneous .... 


2,997 26 




$52,918 77 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$293,985.67; value of investments, $310,578.63. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



153 



CAMBRIDGE NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE, 79 Moore St., Cambridge. 
(Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending July 1, 1915. 

Hon. Robert Walcott, President; Maria L. Baldwin, Secretary; 
\Y alter F. Earle, Treasurer; Miss Adelene Moffat, Supervisor. 

To give instruction in industrial work, home-making, and 
gardening; to conduct a day nursery; to conduct clubs and 
classes, and to further the social and civic welfare of the neighbor- 
hood. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number of house members, 638. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous . 



S852 88 

8,557 36 

65 55 



S9,475 79 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


S5,277 83 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




plies ..... 


206 46 


Provisions and supplies for classes 


430 69 


Water rates .... 


44 00 


Heat, light, and power 


374 25 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


232 48 


Permanent equipment and alter- 




ations ..... 


1,243 76 


Telephone, fares, and express 


224 23 


Camp, outings, and playground . 


118 SO 


Milk station .... 


728 47 


Miscellaneous .... 


161 84 


Entertainments 


187 04 


Garden seed distribution . 


245 94 




S9,475 79 



CAMBRIDGEPORT FRUIT AND FLOWER MISSION, Cambridge. (In- 
corporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending November 30,. 1915. 

Miss Susan A. Hovey, President; Miss Alice C. Taylor, Secre- 
tary; Miss Sarah A. Wilson, 10 Lake St., Cambridge, Treasurer. 

To distribute fruit, flowers, and delicacies among the sick poor 
of Cambridge. 

Number of families aided, 60. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 



S68 73 
61 20 



S129 93 



Cr. 

Provisions and supplies 

Janitor 

Miscellaneous 



S52 


93 


3 


00 


74 


00 



S129 93 



A^alue of investments, SI, 790. 38. 



154 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



CAMBRIDGE VISITING NURSING ASSOCIATION, 35 Bigelow St., 
Cambridge. (Incorporated 1904.) 

Report for year ending February 1, 1915. 

Mrs. Woodward Emery, President; Mrs. Elizabeth B. Piper, 
Secretary; Miss Alberta M. Houghton, Treasurer; Mrs. Kath- 
arine M. Hagan, Superintendent. 

The amelioration of human suffering. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number aided during year, 2,217, viz., 1,696 paying, 521 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 

Deficit 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$5,921 53 


2,248 


16 


600 


82 


269 


16 


$9,039 


67 


121 


62 


3 


62 


$9,164 91 1 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $4,486 79 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies . . . . . 257 58 
Provisions and supplies . . 3,390 78 
Heat, light, and power . . 345 63 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 102 78 

Car fares 493 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 88 35 

$9,164 91 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$9,500; value of investments, $9,125. 



COLUMBUS DAY NURSERY OF CAMBRIDGE, 252 Green St., Cam- 
bridge. (Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for j'-ear ending January 31, 1915. 

Jeremiah F. Sullivan, President; Edward A. Counihan, Secre- 
tary; Timothy W. Good, Treasurer; Mrs. Elizabeth A. Madden, 
Matron. 

To provide a home during daytime for children of working 
mothers, and other charitable purposes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2 to 3. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 155; outside insti- 
tution, 141; number of families aided, 247. 



Dr. 

From'^beneficiaries . . . $477 23 

Subscriptions and donations . 399 60 

Income from investments . . 18 51 

Miscellaneous .... 623 21 

Total current receipts , . $1,518 55 

Cash_on hand at beginning of year 935 54 



$2,454 09 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $884 00 
Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies 26 00 

Provisions and supplies . . 393 71 

Taxes 32 48 

Heat, light, and power . . 215 44 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 335 81 

Total current expenses . . $1,887 44 

Cash on hand .... 566 65 

$2,454 09 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$3,500; amount of mortgage on same, $2,500. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



155 



EAST END CHRISTIAN UNION, 7 Burleigh St., Cambridge. (Incor- 
porated 1889.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Alexander H. Bill, President; Priscilla Jouett, Secretary; Edwin 
H. Hanson, Treasurer. 

■ For the purpose of carrying forward, on a nonsectarian basis, 
Sunday school, temperance, industrial, and such other work as 
shall seem best for the good of the neighborhood. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, about 600. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Membership fees 
Interest on permanent fund 
Sales and fair , 
Rent of hall 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$17 64 

1,073 46 

450 00 

208 00 

1,185 89 

65 50 


$2,559 18 

493 85 


$3,546 88 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage, and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repair; 
Playground 
Insurance premiums . 
Sloyd and kindergarten 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand at end of year 



$1,880 50 

139 16 
88 50 
259 87 
165 64 
191 14 
137 53 
151 32 
113 61 

$3,127 47 
419 61 

$3,546 88 



Value of real estate occupied for corporate purposes, S7,500; 
value of investments, $5,200. 



THE LAMSON HOME, 308 Brookline St., Cambridge. (Incorporated 

1888.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Conroy P. Hall, President; William Albert McCoy, Secretary; 
Franklin P. Daly, Treasurer. 

Home for aged members of Baptist churches, preference being 
given to Baptist ministers, their wives, widows, or (adult) 
orphans. 

The institution is managed by the Baptist Home, and the 
income from its investments is paid over to said corporation. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $500 00 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 924 05 



$1,424 05 



Cr. 



Cash on hand 



$1,424 05 



$1,424 05 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,000; value of investments, S8,000. 



156 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



MASSACHUSETTS ASSOCIATION FOR PROMOTING THE INTERESTS 
OF THE ADULT BLIND, Woolson House, 277 Harvard St., Cam- 
bridge. (Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

James Arnold Lowell, President; Edward E. Allen, Secretary; 
Mrs. Mary Morton Kehew, Treasurer; Miss Mary B. Bradbury, 
Matron, James A. Woolson House. 

To promote the interests of the blind: (1) through the work 
for prevention of blindness; (2) through loans and aid to blind 
individuals; (3) through contributions towards the maintenance 
of the James A. Woolson House; (4) by contributions to the 
support of the quarterly magazine, " Outlook for the Blind." 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 62; outside institu- 
tion, 70. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Board ..... 
Commission for the Blind 
Refunds and interest 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$8,146 00 

1,229 05 

480 00 

322 60 

S10,177 65 

9,111 42 



S19,2S9 07 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$2,840 50 


Printing, postage, and office 




supplies .... 


135 45 


Pro\asions and supplies 


1,827 99 


Heat, light, and power 


666 73 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


301 57 


Insurance .... 


50 00 


Loans and aid .... 


831 88 


Building Woolson House shop . 


10,661 89 


Miscellaneous .... 


309 83 


Total current exp&aaes . 


$17,625 84 


Cash on hand .... 


1,663 23 




$19,289 07 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
S15,900; value of investments, $1,500. 



THE HOLY GHOST HOSPITAL FOR INCURABLES, 1575 Cambridge St., 
Cambridge. (Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Sister D'Arche, President, Treasurer, and Superior; Sister 
Hudon, Secretary. 

Care of persons afflicted with incurable diseases, regardless of 
race, color, creed, or nationality. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 31. 

Number aided during year, 157, viz., 104 paying, 3 partly pay- 
ing, 50 free. 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



157 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


. S5,859 07 


Salaries and wages . 




SS,966 44 


Interest .... 


505 03 


Printing, postage, and oflBce 




Board of patients 


. 37.245 31 


supplies 




384 81 


Work .... 


149 95 


Pro\'isions and supplies 




23,550 63 


Miscellaneous . 


. 3,371 97 


Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental 


re- 


2,801 72 








Total current receipts . 


. 847,131 33 


pairs .... 




5,639 89 


Cash on hand at beginning of 


Extra repairs . 




3,971 62 


year .... 


. 14,188 80 


Traveling and express 

Insurance 

Charity .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 




303 19 

664 33 

455 02 

4,163 60 




S50,901 25 






Cash on hand . 




10,418 88 




§61,320 13 


$61,320 13 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$192,000. 



Canton. 

THE CANTON NURSING ASSOCIATION, Rockland St., Canton, ^n- 

corporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending October 31. 1915. 

Mrs. Fred W. Sumner, President; Mrs. Nathalia Bent, Secre- 
tary; Miss Mildred M. Dunbar, Treasurer. 

To maintain a system of nursing in the town of Canton and its 
vicinity. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 158, viz., 132 paying, 8 partly 
paying, 18 free. 



Dr. 



From beneficiaries 


S491 03 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,397 27 


Supplies furnished 


3 35 


Telephone calls .... 


1 60 


Carriage hire .... 


11 00 


Total current receipts 


$1,904 25 


Loan ..... 


10 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


21 19 



S1.935 44 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . Sl,074 75 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 



plies .... 


18 95 


Provisions and supplies 


180 13 


Rent .... 


80 00 


Light .... 


3 60 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


86 87 


Telephone rent . 


32 28 


Carriage hire and fares 


12 45 


Board for nurses, four and one-hal 




weeks .... 


22 50 


Repaid loan 


10 00 


Miscellaneous . 


1 35 


Total current expenses . 


. Sl,522 88 


Cash on hand . 


412 56 




81.935 44 



158 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Chelsea. 

CHELSEA DAY NURSERY AND CHILDREN'S HOME, 148 Shawmut St., 
Chelsea. (Incorporated 1888.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

J. F. Knowlton, President; A. Louise Long, Secretary; Annie 
E. Holmes, Treasurer; Cassie A. Davison, Matron. 

Day nursery and temporary care for children under the age of 
twelve years whose parents or legal guardians are residents of 
Chelsea. 

Number of paid employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 68, all partly paying. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $188 67 

Income from investments . . 232 80 

Board of children . . . 2,163 05 

Membership dues . . . 241 00 

Total current receipts , . S2,825 52 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 18 57 



$2,844 09 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage, and oflBce sup' 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Water tax 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,353 29 

25 25 
880 15 
227 30 
164 81 

53 07 
116 63 

$2,820 50 
23 59 

$2,844 09 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$19,000; value of investments, $5,009.96. 



CHELSEA HEBREW SHELTERING HOME, 122 Walnut St., Chelsea. 

(Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending November 3, 1915. 

Max Borigovsky, President; Harry Gold, Financial Secretary; 
I. Winsman, Treasurer. 

To supply meals and shelter for poor Hebrews. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$153 34 
140 93 



$294 27 



Cr. 
Provisions and supplies, rent, heat, 

light, and power 
Cash on hand .... 



$123 44 
170 83 



$294 27 



CHEVRA EADISHA OP CHELSEA, corner of Fourth and Walnut Sts., 
Chelsea. (Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending December 11, 1914. 

L. S. Weinberg, President; N. Taymor, Secretary; S. Lavetts, 
Treasurer. 

To bury the dead of the poor Hebrews of Chelsea in the 
cemetery in Montvale owned by the corporation. 



Part IL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



159 



Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 
Employs a collector on commission. 

Number aided during year, 66, viz., 42 paying, 3 parti; 
ine, 21 free. 



pay- 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Lota sold ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$217 25 

25 50 

529 50 



fS52 00 
S50 00 
5S3 95 



$2,285 95 



Ct. 

Salaries and wages . $353 01 
Printing, postage, and ofice sup- 
plies 9 25 

Water tax .... IS 46 

Donation 100 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 69 29 

Total current expenses , . $550 01 

Income in%-ested . , . 850 00 

Cash on hand .... 885 94 

$2,285 95 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
810,000; value of investments, S7,S50. 



OLD LADIES' HOME ASSOCIATION OF CHELSEA, 3 Nichols St., 
Chelsea, incorporated 1885.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1915. 

Albert A. Fickett, Vice President; Mrs. Emma A. Winchester, 
Secreiary; Edwin H. Curry, Treasurer; Mrs. Ida M. Benson, 
Matron. 

Home for Protestant women at least sixty years of age and 
residents of Chelsea for ten years. Admission fee, S150. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 9. 



Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts 
Bonds sold .... 

Real estate sold 
Paid in on mortgages 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$20 


00 


2.914 


39 


$2,934 


39 


2,007 


94 


650 


00 


1.050 


00 


2,059 


48 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Taxes 

Heat, light, and power 
Fiimishings and incidental repairs 
To inmates 
Miscellaneous 

Total ciirrent expenses 
Bonds bought . 
Cash on hand . 



$759 So 

10 50 
902 54 

98 63 
199 04 

43 35 
192 00 

26 25 

$2,232 16 
1,9S3 S9 
4.4S5 76 



$6,701 SI 



$8,701 SI 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
83,500; value of investments, $58,900. 



IGO 



STATE BOARD OF CHAEITY. [P. D. 17. 



RUFUS S. FROST GENERAL HOSPITAL, 100 Bellingham St., Chelsea. 

(Incorporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Edward E. Willard, President; Oliver E. Wyeth, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Emily Pine, Superintendent. 

Treatment of sick persons. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 46. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 1,411, viz., 561 
paying, 598 partly paying, 252 free; outside institution, 1,095, 
viz., 177 paying, 340 partly paying, 578 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Medical and surgical supplies 
Dues ..... 
District nurse (from patients) 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



S32,516 46 
469 35 
400 00 
325 50 
244 68 
95 00 
573 07 
627 36 


$35,251 42 
225 41 


$35,476 83 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office sup' 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Insurance 

Medical and surgical supplies 

Interest .... 

Ice and water . 

Telephone 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$13,135 17 

206 70 

8,631 43 

1,368 00 

2,985 46 



1,714 52 

521 50 

3,229 28 

1,004 69 

763 73 

224 00 

1,279 30 

$35,063 78 
413 05 

$35,476 83 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$60,000; amount of mortgage on same, $19,350; value of in- 
vestments, $17,950. 



SOLDIERS' HOME IN MASSACHUSETTS, TRUSTEES OF, Crest Ave., 
Chelsea. (Incorporated 1877.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1915. 

Eli W. Hall, President; Joseph B. Maccabe, Secretary; Charles 
K. Darling, Treasurer; Richard R. Foster, Commandant. 

Care of indigent soldiers and sailors of Civil and Spanish wars. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 95. 
Number aided during year, 825. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



161 



Dr. 
Government grants on behalf 

of beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Insurance refund . 
Burial expenses refunded 
Effects of deceased members 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 



$124,875 18 

1,783 00 

4,350 47 

50 58 

632 99 

1,328 08 

316 19 


$133,336 49 
21,000 00 

46,225 87 


$200,562 36 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies . 
Loans and interest . 
Heat, light, power, and water 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs . 
Permanent repairs . 
Clothing 

Hospital supplies . 
Farm and live stock 
Paid to heirs of deceased mem 

bers . , . . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$56,339 96 

1,001 13 

45,370 04 

21,090 41 

. 24,912 33 

4,182 96 
6,749 39 
5,281 12 
2,919 37 
1,328 96 

750 42 

$169,926 09 
30,636 27 

$200,562 36 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$440,000; value of investments, $65,428. 



Chicopee. 

THE SHERMAN REST HOME, 259 Chicopee St., Chicopee. (Incor- 
porated 1900.) 

Report for year ending November 5, 1915. 

Miss Clara F. Palmer, President; Charles H. Jenness, Secretary 
and Treasurer: Mrs. Eleanor V. Chapman, Matron. 
Vacation rest home for working girls and women. 
Number aided during year, 19, viz., 17 paying, 2 free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Rent of land .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$15 00 

88 88 
40 00 

$143 88 
2,247 51 



$2,391 39 



Cr. 

Water 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Board for two individuals . 
Extra help .... 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand .... 



$10 00 
65 40 
13 50 
25 00 

$113 90 
2,277 49 

$2,391 39 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$2,450; value of investments, $2,262.03. 



Clinton. 

CLINTON ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF 
TUBERCULOSIS, 205 Church St., Clinton. (Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Dr. Walter P. Bowers, President; Miss Ellen K. Stevens, 
Secretary; John S. Scully, Treasurer. 
Relief and control of tuberculosis. 



162 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Dt. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Red Cross Christmas seals . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand . 



$75 24 

199 24 

320 48 

29 75 


$624 71 
506 69 


$1,131 40 



Cr. 
Printing, postage, and oflace sup- 
plies . . . . . 
Red Cross seals . . . . 
Miscellaneous . . . . 

Total current expenses . 

Cash on hand . . . . 



$4 20 

56 08 

2 00 



$62 28 
1.069 12 

$1,131 40 



Value of investments, $4,729.65. 

THE CLINTON HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE, 271 Church St., Clinton. 
(Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending October 18, 1915. 

Jonathan Smith, President; Eli Forbes, Secretary; W. I. 
Jenkins, Treasurer; Mrs. W. W. Pratt, Superintendent. 

Home for respectable and indigent men and women at least 
sixty years of age and residents of Clinton. Admission fee, S200. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 10. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annmties and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Left at death by inmates . 
Rebate of taxes 
Members and dues 
Sale of old furniture . 
Net income of Bowman fund 
Deferred draft . 



,050 13 
175 00 
,000 00 
,595 00 
257 92 
47 80 
54 00 
104 11 
824 56 
500 13 



Total current receipts . . $6,608 65 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 688 60 



$7,297 25 



Cr. 




Salaries and wages 


. $1,581 35 


Provisions and supplies 


. 1,162 60 


Heat, light, and power 


455 61 


Furnishings and incidental r 


epairs 68 45 


Annual payment on home 


350 00 


Insurance 


63 13 


Credit on deferred draft 


500 13 


For sprinkling trees . 


18 51 


Miscellaneous . 


588 49 


Total current expenses 


. $4,788 27 


Income invested 


. 2,050 00 


Cash on hand . 


458 98 



$7,297 25 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000; value of investments, about $60,713.29. 



CLINTON HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION, Highland St., Clinton. (Incor- 
porated 1899.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Dr. Walter P. Bowers, President; Eli Forbes, Secretary; 
Thomas S. Davis, Treasurer; Miss Winifred L. Stevens, Superin- 
tendent. 

Relief and control of tuberculosis. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 39. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 741, viz., 498 pay- 
ing, 91 partly paying, 152 free; outside institution, 376, viz., 283 
paying, 17 partly paying, 76 free. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



163 



Dr, 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Supplies sold .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$16,370 36 

2,398 17 

66,712 14 

11,480 69 

576 37 


$97,537 73 
325 81 


$97,863 54 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$10,224 11 


Printing, postage, and oflBce 




supplies . . . . 


750 11 


Provisions and supplies 


11,679 97 


Heat, light, and power 


3,114 30 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . . . . . 


3,823 54 


Insurance . . . , 


1,222 22 


Taxes 


192 49 


Interest . . . . . 


611 21 


Miscellaneous .... 


224 28 


Total current expenses . 


$31,842 23 


Income invested 


63,441 46 


Cash on hand .... 


2,579 85 




$97,863 54 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$92,000; value of investments, $124,927.60. 

Concord. 

CONCORD FEMALE CHARITABLE SOCIETY, Concord. (Incorporated 

1896.) 

Report for year ending Januarj' 12, 1915. 

Mrs. Sherman Hoar, President; Mrs. Charles E. Brown, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Herbert W. Hosmer, Treasurer. 

To relieve distress, encourage industry, and promote virtue 
and happiness among the female part of the community; especial 
attention given to the needs of poor children. 

Number aided during year, 16; number of families aided, 9. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Income from investments 
Assessments .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$31 00 
154 74 
182 00 

$367 74 
108 65 



$476 39 



Cr. 

Printing and postage . 
Provisions and supplies 
Hospital bills 
Doctors and nursing . 
Charity . . . 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Income invested . 
Cash on hand 



811 65 
218 36 
56 15 
50 00 
10 00 
23 05 

$369 21 

100 00 

7 18 

$476 39 



Value of investments, $2,650. 



CONCORD'S HOME FOR THE AGED, 22 Walden St., Concord. (In- 
corporated 1887.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

William Wheeler, President; Marion B. Keyes, Secretary; 
William H. Brown, Treasurer; Anna R. Miller, Matron. 

Home for aged persons not less than sixty years of age and 
residents of Concord for at least five years. Admission fee, $100. 



164 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid employees, 3. 
Number aided during year, 9. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Bequest ..... 
Bonds matured 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$647 06 

141 00 

2,411 57 

35 00 

$3,234 63 

1,000 00 

6,000 00 

128 87 



$10,363 50 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
Insurance 

Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Medical attendance and med 

icines .... 
Telephone 

Nursing and boarding out 
Funeral expenses 
Miscellaneous . 
Premium and interest 

Total current expenses . 
Bonds purchased 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$1,378 


70 


26 25 


763 95 


31 


20 


218 96 


161 


14 


55 


21 


24 


05 


131 


00 


80 


50 


35 


05 


142 


09 



$3,048 10 

6,851 25 

29 82 

434 33 

$10,363 50 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,500; value of investments, $57,295.73. 



Danvers. 

DAN VERS HOME FOR THE AGED, Park St., Danvers. (Incorporated 

1901.) 

Eeport for year ending June 1, 1915. 

Mrs. L. Grace Creese, Vice President; Harriet F. Whiting, 
Secretary; George O. Stimpson, Treasurer; Mrs. Orrin Fairfield, 
Matron. 

Home for aged persons over sixty-five. Admission fee, $200. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 7. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Tag day . 
Warren fund 
From sale of bond 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 
Withdrawn from savings bank 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$400 00 


492 51 


1,019 09 


446 58 


200 00 


1,003 97 


93 71 


$3,655 86 


1,011 25 


1,282 54 


$5,949 65 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $933 00 
Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies , . . , . 80 25 
Provisions and supplies . . 767 80 
Heat, light, and power . . 282 94 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 741 26 
Miscellaneous .... 400 81 

Total current expenses . . $3,206 06 

Invested 2,184 90 

Cash on hand . . . . 558 69 



$5,949 65 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$6,000. 



Part IL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



165 



DANVERS VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION, 428 Maple St., Danvers. 
(Incorporated 1908.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1915. 

Mrs. George W. Towne, President; Miss Clara P. Hale, 
Secretary; Miss Isabel B. Tapley, Treasurer. 

To assist those residents of Danvers who need the services of 
a trained nurse, and to encourage effort for the scientific care of 
the sick. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 342 (2,288 visits). 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


S241 70 


Salaries and wages 


Sl,477 35 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,078 68 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




Income from investments . 


15 44 


plies , . . . . 


27 90 


Metropolitan Insiirance Company 


206 95 


Supplies ..... 


39 01 


Entertainments 


170 05 


Travel 


89 10 


Supplies ..... 


2 80 


Telephone . . . . 


20 53 






Miscellaneous . . , . 


2 65 


Total current receipts 


$1,715 62 




Cash on hand at beginning of year 


229 SO 


Total current exi)enses 


$1,656 54 






Cash on hand .... 


288 88 




Sl,945 42 


$1,945 42 



Dedham. 

DEDHAM EMERGENCY NURSING ASSOCIATION, Dedham. (In- 
corporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Miss Margaret Warren, President; Mrs. Erastus Worthington, 
Secretary; Miss Marion B. Loring, Treasurer. 

To provide nurses for the poor and sick in Dedham. 

Number of paid officers and employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 289, viz., 121 paying, 168 free. 



Dr. 

Annuities and bequests to income SI, 068 25 
Income from investments . . 89 60 
Fees from patients and life in- 
surance . . . . 341 40 
Miscellaneous . . . 15 00 



Total current receipts . . SI, 514 25 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 224 21 



S1,73S 46 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $1,213 50 

Printing, postage, and office sui>- 

plies 40 90 

Miscellaneous .... 30 90 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,285 30 
453 16 



$1,738 46 



Value of investments, 82,100. 



166 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



DEDHAM TEMPORARY HOME FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN, Wash- 
ington St., Dedham. (Incorporated 1863.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Miss Mary deF. Denny, President; Miss E. N. Converse, 
Secretary; Miss A. E. Wilson, Treasurer; Miss Lola Merriman, 
Matron. 

A temporary home for tired or convalescent women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 366, viz., 365 paying, 1 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . $3,033 12 

Subscriptions and donations . 666 13 

Annuities and bequests to income 1,950 00 

Income from investments . . 2,189 33 

Rent of land . . . . 225 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 3 00 

Total current receipts . . $8,066 58 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,619 90 



$9,686 48 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




$3,426 50 


Printing, postage, and oflBce 


sup- 




plies .... 


. 


71 83 


Provisions and supplies 


. 


4,197 31 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


244 30 


Extraordinary repairs 




871 03 


Insurance 




254 40 


Tax on rented land . 




36 00 


Miscellaneous . 


• 


30 90 


Total current expenses . 


$9,132 27 


Cash on hand . 




554 21 




$9,686 48 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$4,500; value of investments, $53,600. 



Easthampton. 

HELPING HAND SOCIETY, Manchester Block, Easthampton. (Incor- 
porated 1913.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1915. 

Mrs. William Freiday, President; Miss Gertrude H. Ward, 
Secretary; Mrs. C. W. Rust, Treasurer. 

To help the worthy poor of the town, and to carry on the 
visiting nurse work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 258; families aided, 60. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,135 63 

1,541 19 

$2,676 82 

696 04 



$3,372 86 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $1,651 08 
Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 

pUes 25 79 

Provisions and supplies . . 604 98 

Rent 52 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 81 21 

Total current expenses . . $2,415 06 

Cash on hand . . . . 957 80 

$3,372 86 



PartIL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



167 



Everett. 

EVERETT COTTAGE HOSPITAL CORPORATION (runs Whidden Me- 
morial Hospital), 100 Fremont Ave., Everett. (Incorporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1915. 

Herbert P. Wasgatt, President; Edwin A. Hilton, Secretary; 
F. Frederick Driscoll, Treasurer; Hannah F. Seavey, Superin- 
tendent. 

General hospital work; reduced charges and free treatment 
when patients cannot afford to pay full rates. Creed, color, or 
sex not considered. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 16, including 9 pupil 
nurses. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 345; number of 
free patients (excluding public charges), 17; total number of 
hospital days during year, 5,385; number of free days (excluding 
those given to public charges), 118. 



Dr. 
Patients' payments . 
Nursing service 
Payments by city, town, or 
Voluntary contributiona 
Free beds 
Miscellaneous . 



State 



$7,652 75 

121 61 

685 16 

1,416 19 

450 00 

70 65 



Total current receipts . . $10,396 36 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 691 48 



$11,087 84 



Cr. 

Administration 
Professional care of patients 
General house and property ex- 
penses . . . . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$750 00 

1,363 75 

8,527 32 

$10,641 07 

446 77 



$11,087 84 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$4,000. 



EVERETT HOME FOR AGED PERSONS, 14 Hosmer St., Everett. (In- 
corporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending April 10, 1915. 

John H. Stone, President; Lena B. Sanborn, Clerk; Asher H. 
St. C. Chase, Treasurer; Mrs. Lydia J. Chase, Matron. 

To provide for the support of aged persons of the Protestant 
faith. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 1. 



168 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 



$203 00 
299 10 



$502 10 



Cr 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies ..... 
Provisions and supplies 

Total current expenses 
Income invested .... 



$47 00 

2 35 
100 19 

$149 54 
352 56 

$502 10 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$3,800; value of investments, $16,935.55. 



NEW ENGLAND HOME FOR DEAF MUTES, 112 Fremont Ave., Everett. 
(Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending April 1, 1915. 

Rev. A. Z. Conrad, D.D., President; x\lden M. Cleveland, 
Secretary; Phineas Hubbard, Treasurer; Mabel A. Crockett, 
Matron, 

The care of aged, blind, or infirm deaf mutes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 11, viz., 4 partly paying, 7 free. 



From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



S130 00 


3,077 


70 


3,129 


21 


7 


00 


245 


75 


S6,5S9 


66 


200 


00 


30 


32 


S6,S19 


98 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . SI, 515 00 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies . . . . . 205 71 
Provisions and supplies . . 1,141 29 
Heat, light, and power . . 336 95 

Rent 10 00 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 466 08 

Drugs and medicines . . . 8 05 

Interest 193 40 

Payment on loans and mortgage 2,010 00 

Hospital expenses . . . 16 00 

AHscellaneous . . . . 883 13 

Total current expenses . . S6,785 61 

Cash on hand .... 34 37 

S6,S19 98 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
S7,500; amount of mortgage on same, S2,250; value of invest- 
ments, $100. 



Fairhaven. 

FAIRHAVEN BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION, Fairhaven. (Incorporated 

1896.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1915. 

Mrs. W. C. Stoddard, President; Miss Georgia E. Fairfield, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

To help the sick and needy. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



169 



Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 32; number of families aided, 38. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Charity ball .... 

Total current receipts . 
Invested .... 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$406 00 
407 10 
200 00 

$1,013 10 
10,040 00 

447 39 



$11,500 49 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$40 00 


Printing, postage, and office 


supplies 


2 65 


Provisions and supplies 


67 36 


Telephone 


25 00 


Coal .... 


324 40 


Money .... 


5 00 


Shoes and rubbers . 


84 73 


Clothing 


159 18 


Lunches .... 


75 00 


Medicine, nursing, etc. 


224 75 


Miscellaneous . 


3 35 


Total current expenses . 


. $1,011 42 


Income invested 


. 10,040 00 


Cash on hand . 


449 07 




$11,500 49 



Value of investments, $10,040. 



THE LADIES' BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, Fairhaven. (Incorporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mrs. Lillian G. Delano, President; Mrs. Cora H. Blossom, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 
Relief of the poor. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . 

Suppers and sales 

Miscellaneous . . . . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$15 00 
44 16 
11 65 

$70 81 
107 63 



$178 44 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Home missions . 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$4 75 

35 62 

1 70 

35 22 

9 03 

5 00 

$91 32 

87 12' 

$178 44 



Fall River. 

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF FALL RIVER, 84 North Main St., Fall 
River. (Incorporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending AprU 30, 1915. 

A. J. Abbe, M.D., President; Alice E. Wetberbee, Secretary; 
Oliver S. Hawes, Treasurer. 

To secure the concurrent and harmonious action of the dif- 
ferent charities in Fall River, in order to raise the needy above 
relief, prevent begging and imposture, and diminish pauperism. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of families aided, 268. 



170 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,283 00 

Income from investments . . 51 31 

Total current receipts . . $1,334 31 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 116 21 



«1,450 52 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies ..... 

Rent 

Heat, light, and power 
Telephone .... 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,075 00 

11 45 

240 00 

1 68 

45 85 

. $1,373 98 
76 54 

$1,450 52 



Value of investments, $1,600. 



BOYS' CLUB OF FALL RIVER, 374 Anawan St. and 141 Pocasset St., 
Fall River. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending September 1, 1915. 

Bertram H. Borden, President; Walter I. Nichols, Secretary; 
James W. Bence, Treasurer; Thomas Chew, Superintendent. 

To improve the moral, physical, and social nature of boys and 
young men, by providing suitable games, libraries, baths, and 
gymnasiums. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number aided during year, 1,962. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Annuities and bequests to income 

Income from investments 

Membership fees 

Building . 

Camp 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$4,676 23 


500 00 


134 90 


1,310 58 


3,893 05 


104 75 


43 76 


$10,663 27 


5 46 


$10,668 73 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


. 


$5,971 93 


Printing, postage, and 


office 




supplies 


. 


1,002 81 


Heat, light, and power 


. 


2,072 94 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . 


. 


239 96 


Camp 


J 


303 00 


Anniversary 




122 00 


Reserved for insurance 


. 


350 00 


Miscellaneous . 




85 80 


Total current expenses 


$10,148 44 


Cash on hand . 




520 29 




$10,668 73 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$250,000; value of investments, $4,500. 



CHILDREN'S HOME OF FALL RIVER, 427 Robeson St., Fall River. 
(Incorporated 1873.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

Benjamin S. C. Gifford, President; Ellen M. Shove, Secretary; 
Oliver K. Hawes, Treasurer; Elizabeth T. Colburn, Matron. 

To care for orphan or otherwise needy children (boys and 
girls). 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



171 



Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 103, viz., 75 partly paying, 28 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 



$1,680 35 

878 70 

6,038 05 



$8,597 10 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and oflBce sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light, and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Clothing .... 
Expense .... 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$2,699 63 

65 52 

2,896 38 

572 00 

1,520 46 

93 92 

357 90 

$8,205 81 
391 29 

$8,597 10 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$25,000; value of investments, $124,208.11. 



DISTRICT NURSING ASSOCIATION OP PALL RIVER, 374 Anawan St., 
Pall River. (Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

William B. Hawes, President; Mrs. George L. Richards, 
Secretary; Edward Brayton, Treasurer; Miss Eugelia L. Eddy, 
Superintendent. 

To provide trained nurses to visit sick persons in their homes, 
and to instruct members of the household in the simple rules of 
hygiene. 

Number of paid employees, 14. 

Number aided during year, 5,924, viz., 794 paying, 3,930 
partly paying, 1,200 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $6,593 29 

Subscriptions and donations . 3,543 69 

Miscellaneous .... 604 32 

Total current receipts . . $10,741 30 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,520 11 



$13,261 41 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage, and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Medical supplies 
Settlement work expenses 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$8,659 40 

370 11 
138 94 

87 95 

279 25 

1,073 20 

308 24 



$10,917 09 
2,344 32 



$13,261 41 



FALL RIVER ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY, Pall River. (Incor- 
porated 1908.) 

Report for year ending November 12, 1915. 

Dr. Charles A. Rowland, President; Dr. William W. Marvel, 
Secretary, 151 Rock St.; Mrs. Catherine C. Kieran, Treasurer. 



172 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY 



[P. D. 17. 



To prevent tuberculosis, and to better the condition of persons 
suffering from it. 

Number of calls made, 1,882. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Sale of Red Cross seals • . 
Membership fees 
Interest ..... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$15 00 

1,017 86 

275 00 

9 4S 

$1,299 34 
70 75 



$1,370 09 i 



Cr. 

To District Nursing Association . $780 00 
Printing, postage, and office sup)- 

plies 42 46 

Pro\-isions and supplies . . 23 85 

Red Cross seals ... 178 13 

Miscellaneous . . . , 26 50 

Total current expenses . . $1,050 94 

Cash on hand .... 319 15 

$1,370 09 



FALL RIVER DEACONESS HOME, 825 Second St., FaU River. (Incor- 
porated 1893.) 

Report for year ending May 12, 1915, 

Dr. William P. Pritchard, President; Mrs. S. W. Gibbs, Secre- 
tary; Tram X, Smith, Treasurer; Miss B. Marion Hope, Superin- 
tendent. 

Supports a home for deaconesses of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, an industrial home for girls, an industrial school with 
classes in cooking, sewing, etc., and a fresh-air cottage at Oak 
Bluffs. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 50, viz., 10 paying, 
10 partly paying, 30 free; outside institution, 1,200, viz., 400 
partly paying, 800 free. Number of families aided, 400. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$774 34 


Salaries and wages 


$1,940 67 


Subscriptions and donarions 


1,525 99 


Printing, postage, and office sup- 




Income from investments . 


3,915 15 


plies .... 


63 25 


Loans repaid 


246 73 


Provisions and supplies 


1,233 27 


Drawn from savings bank to in 




Heat, light, and power 


893 28 


vest .... 


1.050 00 


For relief .... 


58 95 


Sale of rights, gas works stock 


1,244 48 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


i 214 86 


Miscellaneous . 


320 00 


Notes and interest paid 


1,014 26 






Gas and electric light work 


3,280 00 






Total current receipts 


$9,076 69 


Loaned .... 


560 00 


Loans to income 


605 00 


Loans repaid 


285 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of yeai 


282 62 


Car fares and insurance 


107 46 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


113 42 




S9,764 42 






Cash on hand . 


199 89 




$9,964 31 


$9,964 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
S22,000; value of investments, S77,000. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



173 



FALL RIVER WOMEN'S UNION, 101 Rock St., Fall River. (Incorporated 

1887.) 

Report for year ending January 2, 1915. 

Mrs. J. M. Morton, Jr., President; Mrs. Edward S. Adams, 
Secretary; Mrs. Charles C. Buffington, Treasurer; Mrs. Sarah B. 
Buffington, Superintendent. 

A building for girls' clubs; classes in cooking, sewing, gym- 
nasium, and restaurant. Provides lodging for women of limited 
means. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number of women lodged in Home during year, 385. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Entertainment . 
Contributed for coal . 
Special fund raised 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$2,480 01 
569 50 
1,285 97 
182 37 
135 73 
990 00 
120 05 


$5,763 63 
300 63 


$6,064 26 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




$2,526 25 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




plies .... 




23 58 


Provisions and supplies 




545 53 


Heat, light, and power 




1,261 78 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


296 57 


Water .... 




134 74 


Telephone 




68 85 


Insurance 




87 80 


Club teachers . 




199 35 


Miscellaneous . 


• 


3 45 


Total current expenses . 


$5,147 90 


Cash on hand . 


• 


916 36 




$6,064 26 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,000; value of investments, $27,600. 



FRANCISCAN MISSIONARIES OF MARY OF FALL RIVER, 621 Second 
St., Fall River. (Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. Daniel F. Feehan, President; Alice Whealan, Secre- 
tary; Anna Jacques, Treasurer; Antonia Barreto, Superior. 

Industrial school for girls; visiting and aiding the poor; assist- 
ing and caring for discharged female prisoners. 

Number aided during year, 810; number of families aided, 405. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$891 50 
2,069 39 

$2,960 89 
255 21 



$3,216 10 



Cr. 

Provisions and supplies . . $1,587 47 

Rent 500 00 

Heat, light, and power . . 335 20 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 181 03 

Miscellaneous .... 297 19 

Total current expenses . . $2,900 89 

Cash on hand .... 315 21 

$3,216 10 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000. 



174 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1' 



HEBREW LADIES' AID ASSOCIATION, Pearl St., FaU River. Incorpo- 
rated 1899. j 

Report for yeax ending Januarj- 5, 1915. 

Mrs. Sarah Packer, President; Mrs. Rose Goldberg, Secretary; 
Mrs. Weinstein, Treasurer. 

To help the poor and needy of the Hebrew faith. 
Number of families aided during year, 16S. 

Dr. ] Cr. 
Charity ball, . . $119 45 Printing, postage, and office sup- 
Subscriptions and donations 332 72 plies ..... $34 78 

Interest 4S 4S Rent 32 00 

Charity 339 75 

Total current receipts S500 65 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,204 36 Total current expenses $405 53 

Cash on hand .... 1^8 48 

S1.705 01 S1.705 01 



HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE, 1168 Highland Ave. 

rated 1891. 



Fall River. (Incorpo- 



Report for j-ear ending Januarj- 19, 1915. 

Milton Reed, President; Louise L. Hathaway, Secretary; Ed- 
ward S. Adams, Treasurer; Mrs. Emeline G. Francis, Matron. 

To care for aged persons of good character not less than sixty- 
eight years of age who have resided in Fall River ten years- 
Entrance fee, $200 and transfer of property. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 25. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$S64 20 


Salaries and waees . 


$3.243 23^ 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,931 04 


Prorisions and sopplies 


4.035 or 


Annuities and bequests to income 


14,522 S5 


Heat, light, and power 


1,619 17 


Income from investments . 


6.097 SI 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




^Miscellaneous .... 


17S 13 


pair? .... 


S59 6S 






Insurance 

Interest .... 


79 77 

51 45 


Total current receipts 


$23,594 03 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Miscellaneoxis . 


42S 27 




359 4S 














Total current expenses . 


$10,316 64 






Inoooae invested 


12.951 35 






Gaahoahand . 


655 52 




$23,953 51 


$23,953 51 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes^ 
$50,000; value of investments, $138,466.42. 



PartlL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



175 



RESCUE MISSION OP FALL RIVER, 45 Fourth St., Fall River. (Incor- 
porated 1901.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Willard H. Poole, President; William A. Hart, Secretary; 
Edward B. Varney, Treasurer; John Chadwick, Superintendent. 

To furnish material and spiritual aid to unfortunate or vicious 
men, and provide them with temporary lodgings and food until 
work can be had. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 18. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 18,353, viz., 13,274 
paying, 3,725 partly paying, 1,354 free; outside institution, 2,533; 
families aided, 75. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $300 00 
From rummage store, salvage of 

paper, etc 9,426 88 

Total current receipts . . $9,726 88 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 41 28 



$9,768 16 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $5,077 89 
Printing, postage, and oflBce sup- 
plies 12 75 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,824 26 

Rent 2,160 00 

Heat, light, and power . . 463 54 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 178 49 

Total current expenses . . $9,716 93 

Cash on hand . . . . 51 23 

$9,768 16 



ST. ANNE'S HOSPITAL CORPORATION, 795 Middle St., Fall River. 
(Incorporated 1906.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Mother Marguerite Philippe, President and Superior; Sister 
Ernestine Bourroux, Secretary; Sister Madeleine Lesage, Treasurer. 

A hospital for the sick and disabled. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 505, viz., 426 pay- 
ing, 49 partly paying, 30 free; in clinic, 777, all free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries , . . $17,045 51 

Subscriptions and donations , 312 25 

Miscellaneous . . . . 20 45 

Total current receipts . . $17,378 21 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,435 10 



$18,813 31 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages , 

Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Drugs and surgical supplies 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$1,832 00 

295 60 
9,938 80 

228 17 
2,095 25 

1,962 10 

995 85 

86 60 

$17,434 37 
1,378 94 

$18,813 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$115,000. 



176 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY 



[P. D. 17. 



ST. JOSEPH'S ORPHANAGE, 56 Bassett St., Fall River. (Incorporated 

1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Rt. Rev. D. F. Feehan, President; C. A. Casgrain, M.D., 
Secretary; Sister St. Gertrude, Treasurer; Rev. J. A. Prevost, 
Superintendent; Sister St. Mathilda, Superior. 

Care and education of orphans and destitute children (boys 
and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number aided during year, 675, viz., 148 paying, 288 partly 
paying, 239 free; number of families aided, 5. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


. $24,382 91 


Salaries and wages . 


$3,848 61 


Subscriptions and donations 


2,677 09 


Printing, postage, and oflBce anc 




Income from investments . 


2,724 94 


school supplies 


210 26 


Industries 


1,183 17 


Provisions and supplies 


9,794 91 


Miscellaneous . 


421 61 


Insurance 


488 00 






Heat, light, and power 


2,043 76 






Total current receipts . 


. $31,389 72 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




Cash on hand at beginning of 


pairs .... 


939 60 


year .... 


290 71 


Repairs and improvements 


2,488 47 






Clothing and bedding 


1,534 37 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


871 71 


. 


$22,219 69 






Paid on capital 


4,000 00 


' 




Income invested 


5,000 00 






Cash on hand . 


460 74 




$31,680 43 


$31,680 43 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$135,000; value of investments, $5,000. 



ST. VINCENT'S HOME CORPORATION OF FALL RIVER, North Main St., 
Fall River. (Incorporated 1888.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

Rt. Rev. Daniel Feehan, D.D., President; Rev. William 
Curley, Secretary; Rev. William E. Corr, Treasurer; Sister Mary 
Felix, Superintendent. 

Care of orphans and neglected children (boys and girls) be- 
tween the ages of five and fourteen (not taken from New Bed- 
ford). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number aided during year, 264, viz., 25 paying, 32 partly 
paying, 207 free. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



177 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $4,949 72 

Subscriptions and donations . 14,590 89 

Total current receipts . $19,540 61 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 9,965 28 



$29,505 89 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office 
supplies 

Pro\'isions and supplies 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Insurance 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$2,283 69 

1,664 87 
6,685 84 
1,734 86 

6,155 99 
469 20 

$18,994 45 
10,511 44 

$29,505 89 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$76,000. 



SEASIDE HOME OF FALL RIVER, 9 Riverview St., Fall River. (Incor- 
porated 1896.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

James Marshall, President; Frank A. Pease, Secretary; Arthur 
P. Brayton, Treasurer; Miss E. L. Eddy, Superintendent. 
Care of sick babies during summer months. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 
Number aided during year, 35. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Lecture .... 



$1,116 95 

57 65 

453 20 



Total current receipts . . $1,627 80 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 467 52 



$2,095 32 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Pro\'isions and supplies 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand .... 



$1,000 69 

558 95 

290 35 

$1,849 99 

245 33 

$2,095 32 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$9,000; value of investments, $1,500. 



UNION HOSPITAL IN FALL RIVER, 538 Prospect St., Fall River. (Incor- 
porated 1900.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1914. 

W. Frank Shove, President; Charles B. Chase, Secretary; 
George P. Brown, Treasurer; Anna E. E. Rothrock, R. N., 
Superintendent. 

Relief of the sick and injured and the education of nurses. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 31. 

Employs a collector on commission. 



178 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number aided during year: in institution, 1,218, viz., 957 pay- 
ing, 72 partly paying, 189 free; outside institution, 3,408, viz., 
2,184 paying, 1,224 free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$49,656 76 


Salaries and wages . 


$21,287 25 


Subscriptions and donations 


23 00 


Printing, postage, and office 




Annuities and bequests to income 


3,500 00 


supplies 


738 92 


Income from investments . 


6,028 51 


Provisions and supplies 


16,053 07 


Nurses* supplies and board 


720 47 


Social service . 


540 62 






Heat, light, and power 


4,440 48 






Total current receipts . 


$59,828 74 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




Cash on hand at beginning of 




pairs .... 


6,389 77 


year ..... 


3,125 08 


Insurance 


288 00 






Bad bills 


2,012 77 






Dental clinic . 


69 63 






Water .... 


633 48 






Telephone 


282 70 






Library expenses 


62 58 






Orthopedic expense . 


133 90 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


804 41 




$53,737 58 






Income invested 


5,803 78 






Cash on hand . 


3,512 46 




$63,053 82 


$63,053 82 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 

$196,180.82; value of investments, $126,241.57. 



FlTCHBURG. 

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF FlTCHBURG, 336 Main St., Fitchburg. 

(Incorporated 1886.) 

Report for year ending September 13, 1915. 

Charles W. Godfrey, President; Mrs. Charles W. Godfrey, 
Secretary; Ebenezer Bailey, Treasurer; Miss Susan M. Turner, 
General Secretary. 

To perform any work of charity or philanthropy that may be 
needed in the city of Fitchburg. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 1,388. Number of families aided, 
394. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



S2,502 90 

130 85 

129 03 

$2,762 78 

638 74 



$3,401 52 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $900 00 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 361 79 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,2.54 88 

Rent 96 00 

Miscellaneous . . . ' . 120 25 

Total current expenses . . $2,732 92 

Cash on hand . . . . 668 60 

$3,401 52 



Value of investments, $3,100. 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



179 



BURBANK HOSPITAL, Nicholas St., Fitchbiirg. (Incorporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Hon. Benjamin A. Cook, Chairman; Wilbur W. Henry, Treas- 
urer and Clerk; Miss Josephine E. Thurlow, Superintendent. 

General hospital for all diseases. Patients taken without re- 
gard to color, nationality, race, or creed. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 70. 

Number aided during year, 1,535, viz., 730 paying, 805 free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



City of Fitchburg, appropriation 


$24,500 00 


Salaries and wages . 


$22,404 70 


Board and care of patients 


17,775 29 


Provisions, etc., including value 




Income from investments . 


11,682 30 


of farm products . 


21,563 29 


Care of tuberculosis patients 


4,077 74 


Fuel, light, heat, power, includ- 




Radiographs and laboratory 


3,614 50 


ing labor 


7,200 18 


Sale of farm products 


683 71 


Medical and surgical supplies 


4,241 45 


Free bed 


250 00 


Printing, postage, telephone, anc 




Rents .... 


90 00 


office supplies 


590 34 


Services of nurses 


12 14 


Ambulance, repairs and vise of 




Bequests 


3,000 00 


police ambulance . 


453 03 


Lumber sold . 


442 53 


Housekeeping . 


3,479 51 


Income from special fund . 


12 84 


Books and newspapers 


47 56 


Miscellaneous . 


3,076 73 


Commissions on collections 


343 93 






Insurance and surety bonds 


178 75 






Total current receipts . 


$69,217 78 


Repairs and maintenance oi 




Sales securities 


1,820 00 


buildings and furnishings, in- 




Cash on hand at beginning oi 




cluding labor 


2,924 01 


year .... 


5,033 82 


Sterilizers and labor 


725 35 






Operating table 


300 00 






Lungmotor 


150 00 






Bronze screens 


394 75 






Changes in dry-room, lavmdry 


250 00 






Additional furniture 


253 75 






Tuberculosis hospital addition 


90 00 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


246 51 




$65,837 11 






Income invested 


9,175 34 






. Cash on hand . 


1,059 15 




$76,071 60 


$76,071 60 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $251,751.52; value of investments, $585,378.81. 



FITCHBURG HELPING HAND ASSOCIATION, 25 Holt St., Fitchburg. 
(Incorporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1915. 

George H. Hastings, President; Miss Edith Baker, Secretary; 
Mrs. Horace F. Gove, Treasurer; Mrs. Ellen McGrath, Superin- 
tendent. 

Home for working women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, about 500. 



180 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY 



[P. D. 17. 



Dt. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


. S11.123 42 


Salaries and wages . 




S3,444 66 


Subscriptions and donations 


119 63 


Printing, postage, and office 




Associate members . 


74 00 


supplies 
Pro^'isions and supplies 




8 75 
5,326 66 






Total current receipts 


. $11,317 05 


Heat, light, and power 




1,408 12 


Cash on hand at beginning 


of 


Furnishings and incidental 


re- 




year .... 


284 18 


pairs .... 
Street watering 
Insurance 

Carting .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 




912 88 

15 00 
354 25 

16 86 
■ 39 14 




$11,526 32 






Cash on hand . 




74 91 




$11,601 23 


$11,601 23 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $68,800. 



FITCHBURG HOME FOR OLD LADIES, 14 Cedar St., Fitchburg. (Incor- 
porated 1883.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Dr. William H. Bennett, President; Miss Adelaide Z. Mclntire, 
Secretary; Warner M. Allen, Treasurer; Susie C. Stanley, Matron. 

Home for Protestant women, sixty-five years of age, residents 
of Fitchburg for ten years. Admission fee, S400 and conveyance 
of property to Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 14. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$1,040 42 


Salaries and wages . 


$1,385 IS 


Subscriptions and donations 


194 00 


Pro^-isions and supplies 


1,311 18 


From special inmates' funds 


287 40 


Interest on bonds 


135 21 


Income from investments . 


3.649 83 


Heat, light, and power 


1,157 52 


Stock di-v-idend 


1,400 00 


Furnishings and incidental re 




Bequests 


25,925 57 


pairs .... 


63 98 


Miscellaneous . 


10 25 


Care of grounds and heater 


128 13 






Inmates' special interest . 


475 04 






Total current receipts . 


$32,507 47 


Insurance 


179 45 


Investment paid 


796 87 


Miscellaneous . 


87 84 


Note discounted 


4.000 00 








Cash on hand at beginning o 




Total current expenses . 


$4,923 53 


year .... 


12,805 02 


Notes repaid . 


8,978 86 






Income invested 


21.138 00 






Cash on hand . 


15,068 97 




$50,109 36 


$50,109 36 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, S26,000; value of investments, 866,136.88. 



Part II.] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



181 



THE FITCHBURG UNION AID HOME FOR CHILDREN, 27 Holt St., 
Fitchburg. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1915. 

Milton L. Cushing, President; Mrs. H. E. Jennison, Secretary; 
Clifton S. Hadley, Treasurer; Mrs. Abbie E. Denlmon, Matron. 

To assist poor and needy children of Fitchburg without re- 
striction of race, color, or creed (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 47, viz., 30 paying, 17 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $646 50 

Subscriptions and donations > . 1,215 86 

Annuities and bequests to income 1,000 00 

Interest 190 30 

Miscellaneous . . . . 30 00 

Total current receipts . . $3,082 66 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 153 74 



$3,236 40 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




$980 50 


Printing, postage, and office 


sup- 




plies .... 




4 80 


Provisions and supplies 




484 14 


Heat, light, and power 




234 58 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


293 78 


Miscellaneous . 


• 


80 03 


Total current expenses . 


$2,077 83 


Income invested 


. 


1,050 00 


Cash on hand . 


• 


108 57 




$3,236 40 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $11,150; value of investments, $5,634.53. 



Fbamingham. 

FRAMINGHAM HOSPITAL, Evergreen St., Framingham. (Incorporated 

1890.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1915. 

John M. Merriam, President; David C. Ahearn, Secretary; 
Fred L. Oaks, Treasurer; Lucy J. King, Superintendent. 

To maintain a hospital for the sick and to conduct a training 
school for nurses. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 70 (including 52 pupil 
nurses). 

Number aided during year, 1,010; number of free patients, 
(excluding public charges), 68; total number of hospital days 
during year, 14,248; number of free days (excluding those 
given to public charges, employees, and nurses), 438; number of 
visits in out-patient department during year, 145. 



182 



STATE BOAED OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Payments by city, town, or State 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends, and rentals 
Nurses' services outside hospital 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$23,825 96 


1,641 63 


4,660 46 


1,545 17 


3,780 30 


791 89 


$36,245 41 


139 90 


$36,385 31 



Cr. 
Administration 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex- 
penses . . . . 

Total hospital expenses . 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$3,530 15 
26,488 92 



5,686 83 



$35,705 90 
679 41 



$36,385 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $60,000; value of investments, $41,500.38. 



HEBREW LADIES' AID SOCIETY OP FRAMINGHAM, Coolidge St., 
South Framingham. (Incorporated 1913.) 

Report for year ending September 1, 1915. 

Mrs. Rose Silverman, President; Mrs. J. Franklin, Secretary; 
Mrs. J. Winer, Treasurer. 

To aid needy families and individuals. 

Number aided during year, 5; number of families aided, 3. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$50 00 
400 00 



$450 00 



Cr. 

Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies . . . . . 
Pro'visions and supplies 

Total current expenses 
Income invested . . . . 

Cash on hand . . . . 



$8 00 
20 00 

$28 00 

22 GO 

400 00 

$450 00 



HOME FOR AGED MEN AND WOMEN IN FRAMINGHAM, 1-3 Worcester 
St., Framinghara. (Incorporated 1886.) 

Report for year ending January 15, 1915. 

Mrs. Nathaniel I. Bowditch, President; Miss Ellen Hyde, 
Secretary; John H. Temple, Treasurer; Miss Alice M. Bacon, 
Matron. 

To furnish a home for indigent persons at least sixty years of 
age, residents of Framingham for at least ten years. Admission 
fee, $250. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 15. 



Part IL] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



183 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . S400 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,355 24 

Annuities and bequests to income 392 00 

Income from investments . . 1,957 08 

Total current receipts . . $4,104 32 

Loans to income . . . 492 74 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 777 24 



$5,374 30 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . $1,859 18 

Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies .... 



Pro\'isions and supplies 

Insurance 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 

Telephone 

Hospital and nursing . 

Funeral expenses 

Inmates' income account . 

Outside laundry 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand , 



27 25 
130 01 

72 60 
926 09 
333 66 

38 52 
185 71 
103 93 
124 50 

57 35 



$4,858 80 
515 50 

$5,374 30 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $30,000; value of investments, $27,258.33. 



Gardner. 

GARDNER HOME FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE, 162 Pearl St., Gardner. (In- 
corporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1915. 

Euclid L. Brooks, President; Edward P. Noyes, Secretary; 
Alec E. Knowlton, Treasurer; Mr. and Mrs. O. C. Lord, Super- 
intendent and Matron. 

Permanent home for elderly Protestant persons, natives of the 
United States, and at least fifty-five years of age. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number ^ided during year, 8. 



From beneficiaries 

Income from investments . 

Total cvirrent receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$325 00 
3,016 95 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage, and office sup- 



$834 58 



$3,341 95 


plies ..... 
Provisions and supplies 


4 26 
785 32 


98 91 


Insurance .... 


420 41 




Heat, light, and power 


321 52 




Furnishings and incidental repairs 


69 07 




Taxes 


251 35 




Fvmeral expenses 


134 00 




Medicine and medical attendance 


57 55 




Legal services .... 


91 50 




Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses 


36 11 




$3,005 67 




Income invested 


25 00 




Cash on hand .... 


410 19 


$3,440 86 


$3,440 86 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $10,000; value of investments, S74,366.72. 



184 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



THE HENRY HEYWOOD MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 342 Green St., Gardner. 
(Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

John D. Edgell, President; Miss Helen R. Heywood, Secretary 
and Treasurer; Miss Marietta D. Barnaby, Superintendent. 

Hospital purposes. No restrictions as to age, sex, color, 
nationality, or creed. Residents of Gardner have precedence 
as free patients. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number aided during year, 754, viz., 685 paying, 65 partly 
paying, 4 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneoxis . 



$17,181 71 

12,000 00 

12,400 22 

63 90 

$41,645 83 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,150 13 



$43,795 96 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $18,489 83 

Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies 430 24 

Provisions and supplies . . 16,635 46 

Heat, light, and power . . 3,934 46 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 1,117 31 

Miscellaneous .... 1,513 98 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$42,121 28 
1,674 68 



$43,795 96 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $100,000; value of investments, $205,798.74. 



Georgetown. (In- 



Sec- 



Georgetown. 

CARLETON HOME, TRUSTEES OF THE, North St. 

corporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1915. 

Edward A. Chaplin, President; Lawrence L. Chaplin 
retary; Harry E. Perkins, Treasurer. 

Home for the poor of both sexes, at least seventy years of age 
Admission fee not less than $100. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 4. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$251 89 


Salaries and wages 


$494 06 


94 00 


Provisions and supplies 


335 75 


1,832 63 


Heat, light, and power 


134 03 


49 94 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


202 72 




Taxes 

Miscellaneous .... 


111 93 
95 26 


$2,228 46 
21 61 








Total current expenses 


$1,373 75 




Income invested 


606 77 




Cash on hand .... 


269 55 


$2,250 07 


$2,250 07 



Part 11. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



185 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $3,000; value of investments, $36,082.94. 

Gloucester. 

ADDISON GILBERT HOSPITAL, 298 Washington St., Gloucester. (In- 
corporated 1899.) 

Report for yeai* ending January 1, 1915. 

Fred A. Barker, President; Fred A. Shackelford, Secretary; 
Horace A. Smith, Treasurer; Julia May Leach, Sujpermtendent. 

To furnish medical and surgical aid to inhabitants of 
Gloucester and others, according to the will of the late Addison 
Gilbert. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3L 

Number aided during year, 377, viz., 299 paying, 20 partly 
paying, 58 free. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Board and service of nurses 

Total current receipts 
Notes payable 
Cash on hand at beginning 



of 



year . . 

Cash on hand for investment 



$888 92 

7,461 00 

11,259 86 


$19,609 78 
5,500 00 

112 81 
1,919 72 


$27,142 31 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light, and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Interest on notes 

Medical and surgical supplies 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 
Cash on hand for investment